diabetestalk.net

Can I Cut Metformin In Half

Reducing My Insulin Burden With Metformin

Reducing My Insulin Burden With Metformin

I've been on insulin therapy for nearly 15 years. A while back, I was taking a lot of insulin in attempt to control my numbers. Although I am a type one diabetic, my doctor said I could still become insulin resistant. Keep in mind, those of us living with diabetes are keeping ourselves alive in an unnatural way; synthetic insulin is no comparison to what the body is intended to make. Every day, I began to exercise and set small, attainable goals for myself. I found a stationary bike easy to commit to, then worked my way up to a variety of other exercise methods like running and hiking. This helped my resistance a good bit, but I was still struggling. As insulin prices crept upward, I realized I needed to figure out more ways to increase my sensitivity and reduce the large load of insulin I had to pump into myself every day. It became more than a financial struggle; I was scared that synthetic insulin could become insufficient. Then what? So with my shallow pockets and fear for the future, I talked with my doctor about the type two medication, Metformin. Rewind a few years. I found myself discussing my diabetes struggle in a room filled with fellow beauty pageant contestants. The gathering was a time for everyone to talk about fitness goals and other details a month before the actual pageant. It was miserable; although I wouldn’t have considered myself overweight, these girls were much thinner than me. But they weren’t insulin resistant type one diabetics. After the meeting, one girl suggested I try metformin. Five years later, I took her advice. My doctor agreed that I may benefit the same way type twos benefit from this established drug. Metformin increases insulin sensitivity, so less insulin is needed. To me, it seemed like a good option. I still can't figure out Continue reading >>

Xigduo Xr (dapagliflozin And Metformin Hcl Extended-release Tablets): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

Xigduo Xr (dapagliflozin And Metformin Hcl Extended-release Tablets): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

(dapagliflozin and metformin HCl) Extended-Release Tablets Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. The onset of metformin-associated lactic acidosis is often subtle, accompanied only by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis was characterized by elevated blood lactate levels ( > 5 mmol/Liter), anion gap acidosis (without evidence of ketonuria or ketonemia), an increased lactate/pyruvate ratio; and metformin plasma levels generally > 5 mcg/mL [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. Risk factors for metformin-associated lactic acidosis include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs (e.g., carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as topiramate), age 65 years old or greater, having a radiological study with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states (e.g., acute congestive heart failure), excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment. Steps to reduce the risk of and manage metformin-associated lactic acidosis in these high risk groups are provided in the full prescribing information [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION , CONTRAINDICATIONS , WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS , DRUG INTERACTIONS , and Use in Specific Populations ]. If metformin-associated lactic acidosis is suspected, immediately discontinue XIGDUO XR and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. XIGDUO XR (dapagliflozin and metformin HCl)extended-release tablets contain two oral antihyperglycemic medications usedin the management of type 2 diabetes : dapagliflozin and metforminhydrochloride. Dapagliflozin is described chemic Continue reading >>

Joang - Should I Cut Aricept Dose In Half?

Joang - Should I Cut Aricept Dose In Half?

My dh has been having intermittent bouts of diahrea since starting on Aricpet about 6 months ago. I took him to the doctor today to see if we could do anything for this problem and the doctor suggested switching his medication or cutting his dose in half. As I have about a 3-month supply of Aricpet in my cupboards, I'm a bit unwilling to just switch. Besides, until just recently, I have seen a very good response to the Aricept. Lately, he's been a bit of a jerk. So, I'm not sure what to do. This is his PC suggesting this and I think I should probably discuss it with his Neurologist. Have any of you had this problem and have any of you cut the dose in half?? Diarrhea has always been a problem with my hb even before he was on galantamine, so use to it. Have you tried maybe giving him an Imodium either whole or half a pill every day? That may be just enough to help. Others who have battled it will be along with good suggestions. My hb has been on aricept for 11 months now. From the onset I decided it would be best to take it in the am so as not to interfere with his sleep. At first it upset his stomach and yes, loose bowels and more often. This is what worked for us. He eats saltines and diet pepsi when he first gets up and an hour later eats breakfast and takes the aricept halfway through breakfast. He usually has to visit the bathroom right after he eats and maybe twice before lunch. He just commented last week that his bowels are not loose anymore and he doesn't have so many urges to go. If we have an early doctor appt. or something he doesn't take the aricept until we get home and that has kept him from getting a surprise urge while we are out. If you are noticing improved behavior I would recommend sticking with it awhile longer and see if he isn't able to become mor Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

A Ci= Confidence Interval B Extended-release Metformin Was Clinically Similar To Immediate-release Metformin Based On The Pre-defined

A Ci= Confidence Interval B Extended-release Metformin Was Clinically Similar To Immediate-release Metformin Based On The Pre-defined

Page 1 of 22 Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets 500 mg and 1000 mg Rx only DESCRIPTION Metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, N- dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: ammonio methacrylate copolymer type A, ammonio methacrylate copolymer type B, colloidal silicone dioxide, crospovidone, dibutyl sebacate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose and povidone. USP dissolution test for metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablet is pending. SYSTEM COMPONENTS AND PERFORMANCE Metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablet is designed for once-a-day oral administration using the swellable matrix coated with a permeable membrane technology. The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of a swellable active core formulation that is coated Continue reading >>

How A Type-1 Diabetic Cut His Insulin Use By Half

How A Type-1 Diabetic Cut His Insulin Use By Half

Health Signs and Symptoms Almost 10 years ago my 50-year-old father started experiencing some strange symptoms: unquenchable thirst, blurry vision, and unexplained weight loss. He was hardly getting any sleep at night, because just as fast as he could drink any fluids they were all coming back out of his system. After explaining this all to me, I suggested he see a doctor right away. Blood tests revealed his post-prandial (after meal) blood glucose levels at 506 mg/dl. Normal levels should be under 140 mg/dl. Diagnosis After all the tests came back, it was determined that Dad had Type-2 Diabetes, a metabolic disorder most often caused by obesity. It was thought that his body developed a resistance to insulin, the hormone in our bodies responsible for transporting glucose from blood and into cells. This was shocking to me. My dad had been thin ever since I could remember, and his buddies gave him the nick name, “String Bean.” He was always a very active person—working a hard labor job, coaching sport’s teams, or refereeing games on the weekends. How could he develop a disorder related to obesity? It took three weeks of diet, exercise, and metformin to get his blood glucose under 200 mg/dl. Metformin is a drug which helps the body lower blood glucose levels by increasing sensitivity to insulin. It also decreases the amount of sugar produced by the liver, and it slows the absorption of sugars from the intestines into the bloodstream after meals. After time, half of a pill was not enough. Soon he was taking as many as TWO pills of metformin and his blood sugar numbers shot up to the 300’s again. Dad was wasting away, and at 130 pounds he weighed almost the same as me! He was following the counsel of his dietitian by regulating his carbohydrate intake, exercising r Continue reading >>

Selected Risk Information About Janumet And Janumet Xr

Selected Risk Information About Janumet And Janumet Xr

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Pill Splitting: Which Ones Are Safe Todivide?

Pill Splitting: Which Ones Are Safe Todivide?

Pill splitting: which ones are safe todivide? Physicians and other prescribers are often frustrated by their non-compliant patients. (Full disclosure: as Ive written about here and here , even the word non-compliant makes me cranky, as it sounds so much like it has punishment at the end of it). These frustrating patients are generally described as those who are not following doctors orders (theres another patronizing term for you) or more specifically, are not taking the medications prescribed for them. A Consumer Reports Health prescription drugs survey reported that many people are splitting their pills in half to save money on high-priced prescription drugs. The bad news, however, is that many have also learned to save even more money by taking half-doses every other day. But heres a consumer-friendly example of pill-splitting that makes sense: A bottle of 30 x 100mg pills might cost almost the same as a bottle of 30 x 50mg pills. Cutting the 100mg pills in half could indeed cut your medication bill, but theres a right way and a wrong way to split pills. You can ask your pharmacist to cut pills in half for you. But if youre considering splitting your pills, these tips from the Consumer Reports Health free pill splitting guide will help make sure that you do it the right way, as the survey report suggests: Look for this kind of pill splitter ($3-10) First, ask your doctor or pharmacist whether your medication can be safely split. Some medications should not be split (more on that below), but in general, many common ones can, includingaspirin, cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, and many high blood pressure and depression drugs. Find out which pills are okay to split and which ones are not. And always use a pill splitter to ensure youve split the medication i Continue reading >>

Use Of Metformin In The Setting Of Mild-to-moderate Renal Insufficiency

Use Of Metformin In The Setting Of Mild-to-moderate Renal Insufficiency

ADVANTAGES OF METFORMIN There is some evidence that early treatment with metformin is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and total mortality in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (4). However, the data come from a small subgroup of a much larger trial. In contrast, despite multiple trials of intensive glucose control using a variety of glucose-lowering strategies, there is a paucity of data to support specific advantages with other agents on cardiovascular outcomes (5–7). In the original UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), 342 overweight patients with newly diagnosed diabetes were randomly assigned to metformin therapy (8). After a median period of 10 years, this subgroup experienced a 39% (P = 0.010) risk reduction for myocardial infarction and a 36% reduction for total mortality (P = 0.011) compared with conventional diet treatment. Similar benefits were not observed in those randomly assigned to sulfonylurea or insulin. In an 8.5-year posttrial monitoring study, after participants no longer were randomly assigned to their treatments, individuals originally assigned to metformin (n = 279) continued to demonstrate a reduced risk for both myocardial infarction (relative risk 33%, P = 0.005) and total mortality (relative risk 27%, P = 0.002) (9). The latter results are even more impressive when one considers that HbA1c levels in all initially randomly assigned groups had converged within 1 year of follow-up. Unlike sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and insulin, metformin is weight neutral (10), which makes it an attractive choice for obese patients. Furthermore, the management of type 2 diabetes can be complicated by hypoglycemia, which can seriously limit the pursuit of glycemic control. Here, too, metformin has advantages over insulin and some Continue reading >>

Tablet Splitting: Is It Worthwhile? Analysis Of Drug Content And Weightuniformity For Half Tablets Of 16 Commonly Used Medications In The Outpatientsetting.

Tablet Splitting: Is It Worthwhile? Analysis Of Drug Content And Weightuniformity For Half Tablets Of 16 Commonly Used Medications In The Outpatientsetting.

1. J Manag Care Spec Pharm. 2015 Jan;21(1):76-86. Tablet splitting: is it worthwhile? Analysis of drug content and weightuniformity for half tablets of 16 commonly used medications in the outpatientsetting. (1)Damanhour University, P.O. Box 22111, Damanhour, Egypt; Department of Clinical and Hospital Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy for Girls, Taibah University, P.O. Box 344, AL-Madinah AL-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. [email protected] BACKGROUND: Tablet splitting is a well-established medical practice in clinicalsettings for multiple reasons, including cost savings and ease of swallowing.However, it does not necessarily result in weight-uniform half tablets.OBJECTIVES: To (a) investigate the effect of tablet characteristics on weight andcontent uniformity of half tablets, resulting from splitting 16 commonly usedmedications in the outpatient setting and (b) provide recommendations for safetablet-splitting prescribing practices.METHODS: Ten random tablets from each of the selected medications were weighedand split by 5 volunteers (2 men and 3 women aged 25-44 years) using a knife. Theselected medications were mirtazapine 30 mg, bromazepam 3 mg, oxcarbazepin 150mg, sertraline 50 mg, carvedilol 25 mg, bisoprolol fumarate 10 mg, losartan 50mg, digoxin 0.25 mg, amiodarone HCl 200 mg, metformin HCl 1,000 mg, glimepiride 4mg, montelukast 10 mg, ibuprofen 600 mg, celecoxib 200 mg, meloxicam 15 mg, andsildenafil citrate 50 mg. The resulting half tablets were evaluated for weightand drug content uniformity in accordance with proxy United States Pharmacopeia(USP) specification (95%-105% for digoxin and 90%-110% for the other 15 drugs).Weight and drug content uniformity were assessed by comparing weight or drugcontent of the half tablets with one-half of the mean weight o Continue reading >>

Duromine - What Do You Think? - Essential Baby

Duromine - What Do You Think? - Essential Baby

Just wanted to check if you've had blood tests before you decide to head onto that kind of medication. Duromine is useful if you overeat and have poor diet habits, however there may be a hormonal or other underlying issue and duromine will only be a bandaid for that, or even completely screw up your body. Only reason I say this is because I found myself putting on weight steadily after having my DD, and it took a Fertility specialist to diagnose me with PCOS (hormonal imbalance caused by insulin resistance) for me to lose weight and feel better. Might be worth checking out as medicine like Metformin for PCOS is cheap as chips and highly effective - where as Duromine is very expensive. ALl the best, I know how much it sucks when you gain weight and can't shift it! I think it is worth the $100 I lost 10 kgs in a small amount of time when I was taking them. Some peopleget bad side effects but I had none. I did eventually put it all back on over 8 months, so this time I lost it all over again without taking them and going to the gym and a personal trainer once a week. I think it is a quick fix but as soon as I stopped taking them the weight did all come back slowly. I would advise going to the gym and working on being healthy rather then a quick fix of the duromine. Hmm might go back to the doctor and have another talk. Yes I have had blood tests and apparently im as healthy as they come. Just fat lol... He said it is more then likely a metabolism thing. Whats going in isnt burning up therefore I am gaining weight. However I do not eat very much at all. We worked out what I eat a day and he was extremely shocked that I eat so little (low calorie also) but still put on weight. I have a treadmill I walk on for an hour a day and also do exercise DVD's every second day. If it Continue reading >>

Help Your Patients Navigate The Road Ahead

Help Your Patients Navigate The Road Ahead

Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. Symptoms included malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Laboratory abnormalities included elevated blood lactate levels, anion gap acidosis, increased lactate/pyruvate ratio; and metformin plasma levels generally >5 mcg/mL. Risk factors include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs, age ≥ 65 years old, radiological studies with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states, excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment. Steps to reduce the risk of and manage metformin-associated lactic acidosis in these high risk groups are provided in the Full Prescribing Information. If lactic acidosis is suspected, discontinue JENTADUETO or JENTADUETO XR and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended. JENTADUETO and JENTADUETO XR are contraindicated in patients with severe renal impairment (eGFR below 30 mL/min/1.73 m2), acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, a history of hypersensitivity reaction to linagliptin, such as anaphylaxis, angioedema, exfoliative skin conditions, urticaria, or bronchial hyperreactivity, or a history of hypersensitivity reaction to metformin. There have been cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis, including fatal cases. These cases had a subtle onset and were accompanied by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, abdominal pain, respiratory distress, or increased somnolence; however, hypothermia, hypotension and resistant bradyarrhythmias have occurred with severe acidosis. Additional findings included elevated blood lactate concentrations (>5 mmol/L), anion g Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Hcl 1000mg Be Cut Half

Can Metformin Hcl 1000mg Be Cut Half

why do people post such important and subject themselves to a potential medical situation- why not just pick up the phone and call YOUR DR. or GO THE PHARMACY AND ASK THEM! Really people!- ## @romine, Well I can't speak for everyone, but I do know that some questions of this nature don't necessarily need to be answered by a doctor specifically. For example, if there is a score line on your pill then it's usually safe to be cut in half, since that's what it's intended for. In the case that there's no dividing line, then it certainly would be a good idea to contact your doctor or pharmacy first and foremost (especially if they are time-released tablets). And even then, not all medical professionals know how a drug is going to end up effecting you until you start ta... ... I think the metformin HCL 1000 mg ER is too much for me. It made me sick to the point i couldnt function. So i started taking half the dosage. 500 mg per day. I cut the pill in 2 and take a half per day. Will this hurt me? ## Hello, Sally! How are you? This is a time released medication, so it should not be cut, that could cause you to get too much of the medication at once. If you have issues taking the higher dose, your doctor can prescribe a 500mg dosage for you to try. What are you current blood sugar readings? The FDA lists the typical side effects of this medication as possibly including nausea, dizziness, headache, flatulence, abdominal pain and diarrhea. ## Are you on any other medications? If your doctor doesn't want to prescribe a lower dose of this one, there are also sev... ... If A Tablet Is Scored Can You Cut It In Half For The Dose I have some Metformin Hcl 1000mg tablets. My dose has been reduced to 500 mg. Is it safe to cut the 1000mg ones in half? ## It is safe, as long as you weren't Continue reading >>

Good Neighbor Rx Blog - Good Neighbor Rx - Save Up To 90% At The Pharmacy!

Good Neighbor Rx Blog - Good Neighbor Rx - Save Up To 90% At The Pharmacy!

Pill splitting can be an easy way to save money. For certain medications you may be able to essentially buy two doses of medicine for the price of one. Research shows that a wide variety of drugs can be split safely, as long as its done carefully. Knowing the best pill splitting practices can help maximize your savings. How to build the best pill cutter strategy for you. ALWAYS discuss pill cutting with your doctor or pharmacist, before starting. It is best to use a pill cutter, like the ones found here , to split your pills dosage. Common pill cutting practice is to divide them in half, instead of quarters. Talk to your physician though, because you may be able to cut the medication into quarters. It is best to use a pill cutter, instead of a kitchen knife, so you can get a more precise cut and avoid the dangers of free hand cutting. What type of savings are we talking about? Let's use a 30-day prescription of 40mg Lipitor. The first thing you will want to do is make sure you are getting the generic version, which is calledAtorvastatin Calcium. By simply switching to the generic, you can save a significant amount of money. In this example,you go from paying $256.90 for Lipitor to $9.51 for a 30-day supply of 40mg Atorvastatin. Thats a savings of $2,968.68 a year! Many people know you should always fill the generic first though. So lets take the savings a step further. If a doctor has cleared you for getting the medications higher dose, then you can start cutting pills to save money.(Find the best price for you prescriptions using the Good Neighbor Rx mobile app. Simply click the link below!) Continue reading >>

When It's Safe To Split Pills

When It's Safe To Split Pills

It sounds simple enough: Cut your pills in half to cut your prescription costs in half. The do-it-yourself practice of pill splitting is one that many doctors and health plans support. It’s a way to counter rising drug prices and encourage people to take their medications if they’re likely to skip doses and refills because of high costs. And those who have trouble swallowing medicine might find a smaller pill easier to manage. How It Works Your doctor will prescribe a higher dose of medication, often double. (Sometimes the higher dose is the same price as the lower dose.) At home, you cut the pills in half and take one half each day, ending up with two doses for the price of one. But deep discounts aren’t guaranteed, so first ask your pharmacist what you’ll save, advises Barbara Young, Pharm.D., editor of consumer-medication information for the American Society of Health System Pharmacists in Bethesda, Md. Note that the Food and Drug Administration has called pill splitting a “risky practice” and doesn’t encourage it unless a drug’s package insert specifically says it has been approved for splitting. But our medical advisers say it’s safe if you follow the guidelines below. Four Smart Steps 1. Get your doctor (or pharmacist) to OK it first. According to an April 2015 poll by Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs, 8 percent of consumers trying to save money on medications admitted to cutting their pills in half without a doctor’s or pharmacist’s approval. Many drugs—notably most cholesterol-lowering statins, and those to treat high blood pressure and depression—can be split without losing effectiveness or causing a negative health impact, but it can be dangerous for you to divide others. Your doctor may have other reasons to warn you about splitting p Continue reading >>

More in diabetes