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Can I Claim Benefits For Diabetes Uk

Disability Living Allowance: The Benefit Broken Down By Condition

Disability Living Allowance: The Benefit Broken Down By Condition

Disability living allowance: the benefit broken down by condition Disability living allowance is under the microscope. Who gets it and why? Disability living allowance. Who receives it and what for? Photograph: Medicimage/Getty Images/Universal Images Gr The government's controversial welfare reform proposals came one step closer to reality this week after a blocking amendment tabled by Lady Grey-Thompson was defeated in the House of Lords. The plan is to replace the disability living allowance (DLA), money paid to help disabled people cover the cost of care and mobility, with a new system, the personal independence payment (PIP). Under the new proposals, those receiving PIP will be more rigorously assessed in order to continue receiving payment. The government estimates the proposals will save around 20%, or 2bn, from the current 12.6bn scheme. The assessments are intended, among other measures, to reduce payments given to individuals whose health has improved to the point where support is no longer needed, which the government says will save 600m a year. Polly Curtis has examined this claim in her Reality Check column here . But how many people receive DLA at present and for what conditions? Data released by the Department of Work and Pensions shows that more than 3.2 million people currently receive DLA. Of these, 500,000 receive only payment to help with mobility, while the remainder are also given some contribution towards the cost of care. Arthritis, with over 500,000 claimants, is by far the most common cause for people to be DLA recipients. Mobility problems, including back pain, arthritis, and other muscle and joint diseases, together account for more than one million DLA claimants. The next most common class of illnesses covered by the payments are learning d Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Disability Allowance For A Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Disability Allowance For A Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Carers Allowance is 61.35 a week (March 2015) to help you look after someone with substantial caring needs. To claim the person you are caring for must be in receipt of either: Personal Independence Payment (PIP) daily living component Disability Living Allowance (DLA) the middle or highest care rate You dont have to be related to, or live with, the person you care for. You must be 16 or over and spend at least 35 hours a week caring for them. Carers Allowance is taxable. It can also affect your other benefits. You might be able to get Carers Allowance if all of the following apply: you spend at least 35 hours a week caring for someone have been in England, Scotland or Wales for at least 2 of the last 3 years you normally live in England, Scotland or Wales, or you live abroad as a member of the armed forces youre not in full time education or studying for 21 hours a week or more you earn no more than 102 a week (after taxes, care costs while youre at work and 50% of what you pay into your pension) Diabetes UK has some information on completing the forms here At the bottom it goes through the pages step by step. We always do a week to 10 days care diary. We also test at night time. To be awarded the middle or higher rate you usually must be giving night time care. Always keep a copy of your completed application form. There is also a closed Facebook group which offers support for parents applying for DLA. Children with Type 1 diabetes have a right to DLA Continue reading >>

Getting Disability Benefits For Diabetes

Getting Disability Benefits For Diabetes

An individual may qualify for Social Security disability benefits based on uncontrolled diabetes or related symptoms like peripheral neuropathy or poor vision. While diabetes that is well-controlled with medication won't form the basis of a successful claim on its own, most disability applicants with diabetes also suffer from other medical problems that limit their ability to work. When filing for disability benefits for diabetes, it's important to list all your symptoms and diagnoses, even those unrelated to your diabetes. Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic medical condition marked by an inability to process glucose in the blood. When the pancreas fails to produce sufficient amounts of the hormone insulin, which sends signals to other body cells to absorb excess glucose, blood sugar levels rise. Elevated blood sugar levels often can be controlled through medication and diet, but persistently high blood sugar levels may give rise to neuropathy (nerve damage) causing numbness, burning, and tingling in the extremities. Other complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney problems, skin infections, and visual changes. Type 1 diabetes, often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, typically manifests in childhood and requires daily insulin injections and monitoring of blood sugar levels. Individuals with Type 1 diabetes are unable to produce the insulin which regulates blood sugar levels. Only about five to ten percent of diabetic individuals suffer from Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, also called adult-onset diabetes, occurs when the body's cells become resistant to insulin and thus fail to process sufficient amounts of glucose. Type 2 diabetes is most common in those over 45, and it is strongly associated with o Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be A Disability?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be A Disability?

Posted on Jan 20, 2017 in Employment by Noele McClelland According to Diabetes UK, there are now 3.9 million people in the UK who are diagnosed with diabetes, and an anticipated 1.1 million currently undiagnosed. Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common type, with an estimated 90% of diabetics suffering from Type 2.   In light of these alarming statistics, are employers required to make reasonable adjustments for type 2 diabetics in the workplace?  Disability is one of the nine “protected characteristics” covered by the Equality Act 2010 (“the Act”).  It is unlawful for an employer to treat those with disabilities less favourably than those without.  In addition, employers have an obligation to make reasonable adjustments for disabled employees.   The Act contains principles that employers should follow in their treatment of employees with disabilities. The Act defines a disability as a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial long-term effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.  The Act does not refer to an exhaustive list of what will be considered as normal day-to-day activities, and rather will be determined on an individual basis.  Applying common sense however, in the workplace, examples could include using a telephone or computer, writing, interacting with colleagues or following instructions. Similarly, what is considered to be a substantial and long term effect, is a question of fact and evidence but the Act provides the following guidance.  The term “substantial” effect is an effect which is more than minor or trivial and an impairment will be treated as having a substantial adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities if, measures are being taken to treat or c Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Benefits

Diabetes And Benefits

Tweet There are a number of free welfare benefits that may be available to people with diabetes if complications lead to difficulty in daily life. In addition, all people with diabetes mellitus in the UK are entitled to free eye checks and all people on diabetes medication should receive free prescriptions. In terms of the benefits related to long term health conditions and disabilities, eligibility for benefits depends on to what extent the life of an individual is affected by diabetes or any addition health issues. The most likely people to be eligible for these kind of benefits include: What is the purpose of disability benefits? The aim of disability benefits is to help those people that need it, whilst incapacity benefits are intended for those that, physically or mentally, are unable to work. What benefits are available to me? There are a number of benefits available for people with diabetes and/or their carers. Disability Living Allowance (DLA) Disability Living Allowance is available for people over the age of 16 years old with care and/or mobility needs. For care needs, there are three tiers of benefit from needing care for short periods up to care covering both night and day. For mobility needs there are two tiers, covering care for those who need guidance and the higher tier for people who find the act of moving around difficult. DLA for parents of children with diabetes Parents of diabetic children may also claim for disability living allowance if there are significant care needs above those of other children of the same age. Personal Independence Payment (PIP) In 2013, Personal Independence Payment replaced Disability Living Allowance for people between the ages of 16 and 64. For care needs, there are two tiers of benefit for both mobility and daily living Continue reading >>

New Dla Guidelines For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

New Dla Guidelines For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Today is a victorious day for the Type 1 community. The DWP have finally published the New DLA Guidelines for Children With Type 1 Diabetes. Wondering what this means for you and your child? Let me explain. Children with Type 1 Diabetes are entitled to DLA (Disability Living Allowance) but the awards can be very inconsistent. Many parents have been left disappointed after being told their child was not elibible, particularly after the age of 12. It’s important to know that DLA is not means tested, so it doesn’t matter if you work or not, or how much you earn. Parents have been busy lobbying MP’s to look at the guidelines that the DWP give to their staff that helps them to decide if a child should be entitled to DLA. On the back of this Diabetes UK, Neil Sykes from Families with Diabetes National Network and Dr Fiona Campbell, Clinical Lead for the National Children and Young People’s Diabetes Network have been working with the DWP to update their guidelines. Previous guidelines really didn’t represent the reality of a child living with Type 1 Diabetes. Today the new guidelines have been revealed…..and yes they are much better. Well done to all involved and a massive thank you too. So what is different I hear you ask? Firstly the BIG win surrounds the age at which children are expected to manage Type 1 Diabetes without help. Previously this was 12 for those on MDI and 14 for those using Insulin Pumps. The guidelines have now been updated to say that children up to the age of 16 will need help from parents and carers throughout the day to manage this condition. It’s worth noting at the age of 16 you can no longer apply for DLA and you apply for PIP instead (but that’s a whole other battle). The guidelines also take into account the new NICE Guidelines, the Continue reading >>

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

There’s a lot to take in when you, or someone you love, is diagnosed with diabetes. Finding out what benefits you might be entitled to, now or in future, may not be top of your to-do list so here’s a quick overview. Is diabetes a disability? Under the 2010 Equality Act, type 1 diabetes is defined as a disability, in that it may have a ‘substantial, long-term, negative impact on a person’s ability to carry out normal, day-to-day activities’. Many people with type 2 diabetes are also covered by this definition. The aim is protect you from discrimination, such as needing time out during the working day to check your blood sugar levels or recover from a 'hypo' (low blood sugar) episode. It sounds confusing, but if your diabetes is being controlled by medication or diet, the impact of your condition on ‘normal activities’ is decided as if you were not taking medication or following a managed diet i.e. if you were not taking insulin to treat type 1 diabetes, this would have a severe impact on your abilities (it could even be fatal) and so is considered a disability. What can I claim for? If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you will be eligible for certain benefits, depending on the extent to which your condition affects your life. For example, everyone in the UK with diabetes is entitled to free eye checks from the age of 12 – once yearly screening for diabetic retinopathy. And if you’re on any medication for your diabetes, you’ll receive free prescriptions. There are additional benefits available to those with diabetes related to disability and long-term health, such as if you need help or if you’re unable to work. Whether or not you’re eligible depends on factors like additional health issues and how much diabetes affects your day-to-day ac Continue reading >>

Diabetes Benefit Altered For Families

Diabetes Benefit Altered For Families

The claiming process providing financial help for children with type 1 diabetes has been changed to “account for the needs of families” dealing with the condition. Diabetes UK said changes to the medical guidance for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) has been altered and now “clearly acknowledges the challenges and extra care required to manage the condition”. DLA, which is a non-means tested and tax free benefit, has historically been awarded to parents of children with type 1 diabetes on the grounds of them being carers. It was introduced to help cover the costs of looking after a child who “needed more looking after than a child of the same age who doesn’t have a long-term condition”. Three years ago Diabetes UK said it saw an increase in complaints from parents who said they were experiencing problems claiming DLA. ‘Misrepresented’ The main issue reported was that claimants, whose children were aged 12 and over, were being turned down. Diabetes UK called for the DLA medical guidance to be reviewed as the charity said it formed a “misleading basis from which to assess the care needs of children with type 1 diabetes”. This newly revised guidance is a big step forward for families and children with type 1 diabetes because it clearly acknowledges the challenges and extra care required to manage this complex condition Working with the Families with Diabetes National Network (FWDNN), the charity managed to contact all affected families and asked them to get their local MP to raise the issue with Mark Harper, the (then) Minister of State for Disabled People. Last year, Diabetes UK and the FWDNN met with the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) during which it was agreed the guidance would be updated. The guidance has now been significantly altered to Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

2. Disability And Sickness Benefits

2. Disability And Sickness Benefits

Disability Living Allowance for children Disability Living Allowance for children (DLA) is a tax-free benefit for children under 16 to help with the extra costs caused by long-term ill health or a disability. Disability Living Allowance for adults Personal Independence Payment is gradually replacing DLA for people aged 16 to 64 with long-term ill health or a disability. Personal Independence Payment Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a tax-free benefit for people aged 16 to 64 to help with the extra costs caused by long term ill-health or a disability. Attendance Allowance Attendance Allowance is a tax-free benefit for people aged 65 or over who have a disability and need someone to help look after them. Employment and Support Allowance You may be able to get Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) if you can’t work because of illness or disability. Carers Carer’s Allowance is extra money to help you look after someone with substantial caring needs. You could also get Carer’s Credit so there won’t be any gaps in your National Insurance record if you have to take on caring responsibilities. Continue reading >>

Living With

Living With

If you have type 1 diabetes, it's important to look after your own health and wellbeing, with support from those involved in your care. Your diabetes care team As type 1 diabetes is a long-term condition, you'll be in regular contact with your diabetes care team. Your GP or diabetes care team will also need to check your eyes, feet and nerves regularly because they can also be affected by diabetes. You should also be tested regularly – at least once a year – to check how well your diabetes is being controlled over the long term. A blood sample will be taken from your arm, and the HbA1c test will be carried out. It measures how much glucose is in the red blood cells, and gives your blood glucose levels for the previous two to three months. For help managing your diabetes on a day-to-day basis, check out the mumoActive app in our Digital Apps Library. Lifestyle changes Healthy eating Eating a healthy, balanced diet is very important if you have diabetes. However, you don't need to avoid certain food groups altogether. You can have a varied diet and enjoy a wide range of foods as long as you eat regularly and make healthy choices. You can make adaptations when cooking meals, such as reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar you eat, and increasing the amount of fibre. You don't need to completely exclude sugary and high-fat foods from your diet, but they should be limited. The important thing in managing diabetes through your diet is to eat regularly and include starchy carbohydrates, such as pasta, as well as plenty of fruit and vegetables. If your diet is well balanced, you should be able to achieve a good level of health and maintain a healthy weight. Read more about healthy recipes. Diabetes UK has more dietary advice and cooking tips. Regular exercise As physical Continue reading >>

Money Matters

Money Matters

Money is often a problem, whether you're a student or have just started a job (people rarely start on decent salaries). You'll want to economise, but don't sacrifice your health for the sake of a slightly bigger bulge in your wallet. It's one thing you can't afford to do if you have diabetes. Life on a shoestring One big weekly shop at your supermarket will work out cheaper than lots of single trips to the local shops over the week.One big weekly shop at your supermarket will work out cheaper than lots of single trips to the local shops over the week. Bread, cereals, pasta and potatoes are relatively cheap and filling.Bread, cereals, pasta and potatoes are relatively cheap and filling. Look out for supermarket ‘own brands’ and in-house specials.Look out for supermarket ‘own brands’ and in-house specials. Some supermarkets sell produce at reduced prices near the end of the day (but always check the sell-by date).Some supermarkets sell produce at reduced prices near the end of the day (but always check the sell-by date). Market stalls are cheaper for fish, eggs, fruit and veg.Market stalls are cheaper for fish, eggs, fruit and veg. Buy some foods in bulk, such as pasta, potatoes, rice, dried beans and pulses.Buy some foods in bulk, such as pasta, potatoes, rice, dried beans and pulses. Frozen veg and tinned fruit are useful if you find fresh ones go off before you use them.Frozen veg and tinned fruit are useful if you find fresh ones go off before you use them. Beans and pulses are cheap, filling and as nutritious as meat or fish – they take more imagination to cook with, but it's worth it.Beans and pulses are cheap, filling and as nutritious as meat or fish – they take more imagination to cook with, but it's worth it. On prescription People with Type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Focus On Disability

Focus On Disability

Diabetes can lead to disabling conditions because the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. The cause of diabetes continues to be a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles. See also: Diabetes Herbal Therapies and Sugar Craving Products Diabetic Products Type 1 diabetes: It used to be called insulin-dependent diabetes and occurs when the body fails to produce insulin, the hormone required for controlling blood sugar levels. People with type 1 diabetes require regular insulin injections to correct this. All type 1 diabetes patients should have access to a qualified dietitian, as diet is an important part of their clinical care. Type 1 diabetes usually affects young people, often in childhood, and is the least common of the two forms of diabetes accounting for between five to 15 per cent of all people with this disease. Type 2 diabetes: This type of diabetes develops slowly. It's much more common than type 1 diabetes, accounting for at least 75 per cent of cases. Type 2 diabetes often develops later in life although cases in obese children and young adults are becoming more common. It's strongly related to being overweight. Diabetes is a life-long condition which you need to take seriously. Managing your diabetes well is a balancing act where you have to manage your medication (if you are taking any), with a healthy diet and physical activity. Whether you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, you should aim to eat a healthy diet and be as physically active as you can. The main difference in treating Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes is the medication you receive. The management of diabetes m Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Benefits And Allowances

Type 1 Diabetes Benefits And Allowances

Type 1 diabetes benefits and allowances Children under the age of 16 with type 1 diabetes may be entitled to a social security benefit called Disability Living Allowance (DLA) DLA may be available if your child needs more care and assistance than other children their age. You should be given information by your diabetes clinic about the extra supervision required now that your child has type 1 diabetes and how to claim DLA to help cover the extra costs involved with a long term health condition such as type 1. It is becoming increasingly difficult to get awarded DLA on first application, we encourage you to always do a mandatory reconsideration (MR) and if need be after that request a tribunal if you are not given an award or you feel the award is not as it should be. Managing Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 job to manage it to try and keep you as healthy as possible. As of May 2016, DWP have recently updated their decision maker’s guidelines and it could be more likely that awards are now given to 16 years old. Until now, families often had to reapply after a 1 or 2 year term. DWP information on Benefits and allowances you may be able to claim for children under 16 years. Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for children may help with the extra costs of looking after a child who: is under 16 has difficulties walking or needs more looking after than a child of the same age who doesn’t have a disability. They will need to meet all the eligibility requirements. www.gov.uk/disability-living-allowance-children/eligibility Diabetes UK has some information on completing the forms. Always submit a week to 10 days care diary with your application form. To be awarded the middle or higher rate you usually must be giving night time care, so it is helpful to show the frequency of this i Continue reading >>

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