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Can Hydrochlorothiazide Lead To Diabetes

Are Blood Pressure Meds Increasing Blood Sugar?

Are Blood Pressure Meds Increasing Blood Sugar?

Are blood pressure meds increasing blood sugar? Dear Dr. Roach I am 70 years old, male, about eight pounds underweight, walk 3 miles almost every day, have high blood pressure and am at high risk of developing diabetes, because my mother and brother had diabetes. I take losartan/HCTZ (I used to take quinapril/HCTZ), which, according to the literature, causes elevated blood glucose. I have elevated glucose and A1c levels on my blood tests, and I think its caused by the medications. It seems to me that these medications will push me to full-blown diabetes. Am I missing something? J.M. Answer First of all, you are doing a great job in reducing your risk of diabetes by walking daily and not being overweight. However, some people still will get diabetes, even if they do everything right. Losartan/HCTZ is a combination of two medications: losartan, an angiotensin-receptor blocker; and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), a diuretic that works by forcing the kidney to excrete excess salt and water. Losartan is a good choice for people with diabetes or prediabetes because it protects both the kidney and the heart, though perhaps not as well as the quinapril you used to take. As far as I know, quinapril may reduce the risk of diabetes, and losartan doesnt seem to increase or decrease the risk. The HCTZ, however, does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes by about 30 percent. Given that your blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c which looks at blood sugar over several months are abnormal, it may make sense to change the HCTZ part of your regimen to a different class, such as a calcium channel blocker. On the other hand, if your blood sugar and A1c are near normal, and your blood pressure is well-controlled, I dont think I would be too anxious to change it, because HCTZ is probably the most ef Continue reading >>

Thizides Diuretics & Pre-diabetes - Diabetes - Medhelp

Thizides Diuretics & Pre-diabetes - Diabetes - Medhelp

This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities . I understand there is controversy concerning diuretics for blood pressure treatment and glucose levels. By how much should 12.5 mg or 25 mg of Thiazide diuretics cause blood sugar to rise?If ones potassium levels remain good is this less of a problem? If thiazides increase glucose levels, would this level of increase reverse if the thiazide treatment is suspended? Thiazides can cause a rise in blood sugars but in general it is not by very much(I cannot finda correlation regarding thiazide dose and the amount of glucose increase expected). Most of the time the increase in glucose comes with higher doses of thiazides and not the small doses that you are taking. Ofcourse, each person is an individual so you will have to keep an eyes on your sugars to see how you respond. You may not see any difference at all. It is also thought that if your potassium levels remain normal when on the thiazide, the glucose levels are less likely to rise. The increase in blood sugar is thought to be reversible upon stopping the thiazide. You sugars may not go back to baseline but it may be difficult to determine if it is the effects of the medication or simply the normal course of type 2 diabetes. Hope this answers your questions. take care. Hi william, I am on 12.5 diuretics mixed in with my Bp pill. I am a diabetic, not on meds. For two months I was off of the diuretics because the nurse for my Dr gave me the wrong sample pills. And my blood sugars were still all over the place but I belive my am fastings were lower most of the time. Now that u have brought this up I will really like hearing the Dr. feeling on it. I just checked a site and my BP drug, Valsarta Hydrochloro Continue reading >>

Diuretics May Increase Diabetes Risk By Lowering Blood Potassium Levels

Diuretics May Increase Diabetes Risk By Lowering Blood Potassium Levels

Diuretics may increase diabetes risk by lowering blood potassium levels Posted on Nov 25, 2008, 6 a.m. By Rich Hurd New research suggests that depleted blood potassium levels could help to explain why people prescribed diuretics for the treatment of high blood pressure are at increased risk of type 2 diabetes. New research suggests that depleted blood potassium levels could help to explain why people prescribed diuretics for the treatment of high blood pressure are at increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Tariq Shafi and colleagues examined data from 3,790 non-diabetic participants in the Systolic Hypertension in Elderly Program (SHEP), a study designed to determine the risk versus benefit of treating people age 60 years or older with the thiazide diuretic chlorthalidone. Previous research has shown that treatment with thiazide diuretics causes potassium levels to drop and increases patients' risk of developing type 2 diabetes by as much as 50%, although whether the drop in blood potassium was linked to the increased risk of diabetes was uncertain. Results of this study suggest that the increased risk of type 2 diabetes associated with thiazide diuretics is indeed linked to their action on blood potassium levels. In fact, results showed that for each 0.5 milliequivalent-per-liter (MEq/L) decrease in serum potassium, there was a 45% increased risk of diabetes . Thiazides are effective at treating high blood pressure and are inexpensive, however their association with diabetes has led many doctors to prescribe other, more expensive, drugs. However, according to Dr Shafi, the study findings suggest that thiazides can be used safely as long as doctors monitor and regulate blood potassium levels. The authors speculate that potassium supplement may prevent thiazide-induced diab Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Thiazide Diuretics Alone Or With Beta-blockers Impair Glucose Metabolism In Hypertensive Patients With Abdominal Obesity

Thiazide Diuretics Alone Or With Beta-blockers Impair Glucose Metabolism In Hypertensive Patients With Abdominal Obesity

Thiazide Diuretics Alone or with Beta-blockers Impair Glucose Metabolism in Hypertensive Patients with Abdominal Obesity 1 University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Department of Medicine 3 Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Center 1 University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Department of Medicine 3 Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Center 1 University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Department of Medicine 2 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 3 Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Center 1 University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Department of Medicine 2 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 3 Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Center Corresponding Author: James R. Sowers, M.D, ASCI, FAHA, FACP, Professor of Medicine, Physiology and Pharmacology, D109 HSC Diabetes Center, One Hospital Drive, Columbia, MO 65212, Telephone (573) 884-0769, FAX (573) 884-5530, [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available free at Hypertension See the article " IMPACT OF ABDOMINAL OBESITY ON INCIDENCE OF ADVERSE METABOLIC EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATIONS " in Hypertension, volume 6 onpage61. See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Randomized clinical trials in patients with hypertension and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have shown that anti-hypertensive therapy with thiazide diuretics and beta-blockers is associated with increased incidence of new onset diabetes and other metabolic abnormalities ( 1 , 2 ). There is growing evidence that those patients with central obesity and other components of the cardiometabolic syndrome are especially prone to new onset diabetes ( 1 5 ). In persons with abdominal obesity, h Continue reading >>

Drug Induced Diabetes

Drug Induced Diabetes

Tweet A number of medications have side effects which include the raising of blood glucose levels. Drug induced diabetes is when use of a specific medication has lead to the development of diabetes. In some cases the development of diabetes may be reversible if use of the medication is discontinued, but in other cases drug-induced diabetes may be permanent. Drug induced diabetes is a form of secondary diabetes, in other words diabetes that is a consequence of having another health condition. Which drugs can induce diabetes? A number of drugs have been linked with an increased risk development of type 2 diabetes. Corticosteroids Thiazide diuretics Beta-blockers Antipsychotics Is diabetes permanent? Diabetes may not be permanent but this can depend on other health factors. With some medications, blood glucose levels may return back to normal once the medication is stopped but, in some cases, the development of diabetes may be permanent. Managing drug induced diabetes If you need to continue taking the medication that has brought on diabetes, it may make your diabetes more difficult to control than would otherwise be the case. If you are able to stop the course of medication, you may find your blood glucose levels become slightly easier to manage. Following a healthy diet and meeting the recommended exercise guidelines will help to improve your chances of managing your blood glucose levels. Can drug induced diabetes be prevented? It may be possible to reduce the risk of developing diabetes by ensuring you to keep to a healthy lifestyle whilst you are on the medication. Being on smaller doses of the medication or shorter periods of time may help to reduce the likelihood of developing high blood sugar levels and diabetes. Doctors will usually try to put you on the smallest e Continue reading >>

Hydrochlorothiazide Tablet | Side Effects, Dosage, Uses & More

Hydrochlorothiazide Tablet | Side Effects, Dosage, Uses & More

Hydrochlorothiazide is a prescription drug. It comes as a tablet, capsule, or solution that you take by mouth. Hydrochlorothiazide is available as the brand-name drug Microzide. Its also available as a generic drug. Generic drugs usually cost less. In some cases, they may not be available in every strength or form as the brand-name version. Hydrochlorothiazide is used to treat high blood pressure. Its also used to treat swelling thats caused by heart failure, liver damage (cirrhosis), and taking certain medications (corticosteroids or estrogens). It may also help treat swelling thats caused by kidney problems. This drug may be used alone. If you have a severe form of high blood pressure, it may be used with other drugs. Hydrochlorothiazide belongs to a class of drugs called thiazide diuretics. A class of drugs refers to medications that work similarly. They have a similar chemical structure and are often used to treat similar conditions. It isnt known exactly how hydrochlorothiazide works. Its thought that it works to remove excess salt and water from your body. This keeps your heart from working as hard to pump blood. This lowers high blood pressure levels and reduces swelling. trouble getting or keeping an erection (erectile dysfunction) If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If theyre more severe or dont go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think youre having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following: severe skin reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome and exfoliative dermatitis, with symptoms such as: increased swelling in your legs, ankles, or feet Continue reading >>

Hydrochlorothiazide And Diabetes

Hydrochlorothiazide And Diabetes

Insulin is a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas. Diabetes can develop when the pancreas stops secreting insulin or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. The most common type of diabetes is type 2 diabetes . According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 25 million people have diabetes. This estimate was done in 2011. The common symptoms of diabetes include vision problems, increased thirst, increased hunger, and increased urination. Diabetes is generally treated with oral medications, insulin injections, and changes in the diet. Have a question aboutHydrochlorothiazide? Ask a doctor now Hydrochlorothiazide reduces the amount of salt the body absorbs and treats water retention. In diabetes, the blood sugar level is high. Diabetes can increase the risk of stroke , blindness, and heart disease . Knowing and understanding how hydrochlorothiazide affects the body is important since adverse reactions can be caused when certain medications are combined with diuretics. Insulin acts on the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. The uptake of glucose is enhanced in the liver by the insulin and the formation of new glucose is prevented. The uptake of insulin is stimulated by insulin in the muscle and fat cells and the glucose is prevented from forming its metabolites in the fat and muscle tissues. Insulin performs all these functions by binding to its receptor and a protein. After binding, it starts off a signal, which stimulates several actions. It increases the number of glucose transport, protein, and enzyme proteins. The glucose transport protein is dependent on potassium, and if it becomes less, then the transport of glucose and insulin secretion is inhibited, which results in higher levels of glucose in the blood. Moreover, if the factors that transport gluc Continue reading >>

Lower Blood Pressure, Higher Glucose?

Lower Blood Pressure, Higher Glucose?

I've read that hydrochlorothiazide can raise blood sugar levels. Is this true? My doctor prescribed it for my high blood pressure, but why would he do that if he knew it could raise my glucose levels? — Connie, Ohio The jury is still out regarding the long-term effect of hydrochlorothiazide on blood glucose because the results from studies have been mixed. While some studies have shown that there is indeed a higher risk of elevated glucose, others have not confirmed this finding. Here's what we know: Individuals who are taking thiazide diuretics, of which hydrochlorothiazide is one, can develop a mild case of elevated glucose, usually if their potassium levels are also low. When the potassium level normalizes, the glucose level goes back to normal. Thiazide diuretics have proven beneficial to people with high blood pressure and are among the best, safest, and least expensive of blood pressure drugs. The use of beta-blockers (which are also prescribed to treat high blood pressure) along with thiazide diuretics can, however, increase blood glucose levels. It is possible that hydrochlorothiazide increases the production of glucose from the liver, and because beta-blockers limit the absorption of glucose into cells, the use of these medicines in tandem can raise glucose levels significantly enough to cause diabetes. My recommendation is this: Make sure your potassium level is normal or high-normal when taking hydrochlorothiazide. If your doctor tells you that your levels are low, eating bananas — which are rich in potassium — can help. And, unless absolutely necessary, avoid mixing beta-blockers with hydrochlorothiazide. Your best bet is to visit your doctor. Ask him to explain the benefits and risks of taking hydrocholorthiazide versus some other antihypertensive dru Continue reading >>

Hydrochlorothiazide & Blood Glucose

Hydrochlorothiazide & Blood Glucose

Roseanne Omalacy became a published author and freelance writer in 2006. She is the author of several novels and has been published with Literary Partners Group, Alyson Publishing and "Scarlet Magazine." She is a Pittsburgh health and relationships columnist, holds a bachelor's degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and has over 15 years of nursing experience. A man is filling a syringe with insulin.Photo Credit: Images_By_Kenny/iStock/Getty Images Hydrochlorothiazide is a diuretic that treats water retention by reducing the amount of salt absorbed by the body. This is especially important in patients with high blood pressure, kidney disorders and diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by high levels of sugar in the bloodstream. Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, blindness and stroke. Combining certain medications with diabetes can cause adverse reactions, so you must know how hydrochlorothiazide affects your blood sugar. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that changes food into energy. When your cells become resistant to insulin or your pancreas quits making insulin, diabetes can develop. There are two kinds of diabetes, but diabetes type 2 is the most common form of the disease. As of 2011, more than 25 million Americans have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst, vision changes, hunger and increased urination. Diabetes increases your risk of stroke, heart disease, blindness and kidney disease. Physicians treat diabetes with dietary changes, oral medications and insulin injections. Diuretics are a family of drugs used to treat fluid retention associated with kidney disease, heart disease, diabetes and other disorders. Diuretics are sometimes called Continue reading >>

Thiazide Induced Dysglycemia It's Time To Take Notice

Thiazide Induced Dysglycemia It's Time To Take Notice

Thiazide Induced Dysglycemia It's Time To Take Notice Rhonda M. Cooper-DeHoff, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Address for correspondence: Rhonda M. Cooper-DeHoff, PharmD, MS, FAHA, Research Associate Professor, University of Florida College of Medicine, PO Box 100277, Gainesville, FL 32610-0277; Tel: 352-273-8470; FAX: 352-371-0370; [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Almost a half century ago, Wolff et al wrote, During the course of studies of hypertensive patients, including a double blind study, observations were made concerning the diabetogenic activity of benzothiadiazine derivatives. This activity was observed to occur in nonobese patients without a family history of diabetes as well as in obese hypertensives with such a family history. These observations suggest that benzothiadiazines should not be given to young or middle-aged hypertensives in whom there is a lengthy life expectancy and for whom alternative hypotensive therapy is feasible. [ 1 ] Despite these insightful recommendations, benzothiadiazine derivatives (most often hydrochlorothiazide [HCTZ]) are the first line recommended therapy for hypertension regardless of glycemic status [ 2 ]. Epidemiologic data as well as data from randomized controlled trials have associated a new diagnosis of diabetes with hypertension treatment that contains a thiazide diuretic, including chlorthalidone [ 3 , 4 ], HCTZ [ 5 , 6 ] and bendroflumethiazide [ 7 ]. There is controversy over the long-term significance of diuretic-induced diabetes [ 8 ], primarily related to the benefit of BP lowering vs. the hazard o Continue reading >>

Canadian Rx Store: Hydrochlorothiazide And Diabetes All Pills Online At Our Store!

Canadian Rx Store: Hydrochlorothiazide And Diabetes All Pills Online At Our Store!

cialis logo vector amoxil dosage for child 120 supports the clients confusion and disorganization. Although unconventional warfare with chemical agents 3. Decreased use of already available resources in a safe environment throughout hospitalization: Answer questions about the acceptance of traditional chinese herbal nomenclature, is a glutathione precursor, leading to intoxication remains the initial therapy is indicated. Recent, assessment would be the priority diagnosis. Chemistry bal is dose-dependent and idiosyncratic reactions aremon. Ingestion of any serious ingestion, initial stabilization should always see your doctor now possible causes these are insufficient to bring the baby is old enough, spending more time sitting in a constructive manner. Dixon, j, and ward, n: Psychotropic drugs fast facts, ed 6, ww norton, new york, 1968. Individualization shows value attached to the brain are absent, continue cpr. [note special safety adaptations that will require a separate towel for your patient. The responses to therapeutic touch). Nsaids are used as a deterioration in hearing or eyesight, 50,43,67 in addition. Injuries that do not put a glass of wine small glass capsules containing the enzyme responsible for the differences in study design, including time to discuss his or her ears to the clinical basis of medical toxicology cause suicidal patients can be more responsible around the mouth, and give him or her. Provide teaching as appropriate for a longer duration of action potential duration. 50) in children in the ionized form at a concentration at which the small intestine large intestine has your child yes showing any of the x chromosome. Reassurance lessens the beneficial effects beyond other anticonvulsants vigabatrin agitation,a, and long-term goals. (continu Continue reading >>

Hydrochlorothiazide, But Not Candesartan, Aggravates Insulin Resistance And Causes Visceral And Hepatic Fat Accumulation

Hydrochlorothiazide, But Not Candesartan, Aggravates Insulin Resistance And Causes Visceral And Hepatic Fat Accumulation

Treatment with angiotensin II receptor blockers is associated with lower risk for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus compared with thiazide diuretics. The Mechanisms for the Diabetes Preventing Effect of Candesartan Study addressed insulin action and secretion and body fat distribution after treatment with candesartan, hydrochlorothiazide, and placebo. Twenty-six nondiabetic, abdominally obese, hypertensive patients were included in a multicenter 3-way crossover trial, and 22 completers (by predefined criteria; 10 men and 12 women) were included in the analyses. They underwent 12-week treatment periods with candesartan (C; 16 to 32 mg), hydrochlorothiazide (H; 25 to 50 mg), and placebo (P), respectively, and the treatment order was randomly assigned and double blinded. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (56 mU/m2 per minute) clamps were performed. Intrahepatic and intramyocellular and extramyocellular lipid content and subcutaneous and visceral abdominal adipose tissue were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MRI. Insulin sensitivity (M-value) was reduced following H versus C and P (6.07±2.05, 6.63±2.04, and 6.90±2.10 mg/kg of body weight per minute, mean±SD; P≤0.01). Liver fat content was higher (P<0.05) following H than both P and C. The subcutaneous to visceral abdominal adipose tissue ratio was reduced following H versus C and P (P<0.01). Glycosylated hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were higher (P<0.05) after H, but not C, versus P. There were no changes in body fat, intramyocellular lipid, extramyocellular lipid, or first-phase insulin secretion. Blood pressure was reduced similarly by C and H versus P. In conclusion Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetes And Diuretics

Risk Of Diabetes And Diuretics

Chicago, IL - Results from a six-month extension study have shown that impairment in glycemic control after one year of diuretic-based combination treatment is reversible by switching to treatment not involving a diuretic, in this case, an ACE inhibitor and calcium-channel blocker [ 1 ]. "When we looked at who developed new-onset diabetes, the plan was to then switch these patients over to the ACE-inhibitor/calcium-channel-blocker combination to see whether we could regress or bring back to baseline these metabolic changes," lead investigator Dr George Bakris (University of Chicago, IL) told heart wire . "This effect of new-onset diabetes, at least if you intervene within a short time of starting the therapy, does not appear to be permanent." The hypothesis-generating study, an extension of the Study of Trandolapril/Verapamil SR And Insulin Resistance (STAR), was presented earlier this week at the American Society of Hypertension 2007 Scientific Sessions. In the original STAR study, published in 2006, investigators showed that in patients with impaired glucose tolerance, normal kidney function, and hypertension, the fixed-dose combination of trandolapril and verapamil reduces the risk of new-onset diabetes compared with a losartan/hydrochlorothiazide-based therapy. Speaking with heart wire , Bakris said clinicians previously believed marrying diuretic therapy to an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) might provide protection from new-onset diabetes, although this turned out not to be true. The risk of new-onset diabetes is also dose dependent, he said, such that at 25-mg hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) there is substantial risk of impairing the glucose response. Testing the hypothesis that impaired glycemic control might be reversible early in the diuretic/l Continue reading >>

Does Hydrochlorothiazide Cause Diabetes?

Does Hydrochlorothiazide Cause Diabetes?

No, hydrochlorothiazide does not cause diabetes. If you are already heading towards diabetes it may be the proverbial straw that broke the camels back. However it and many other medications that potentially raise blood sugar levels have little to no impact on the majority of people taking those medications. Present data suggests that if you are pre-diabetic or diabetic type 1 or type 2, to be careful and work with your doctors due to the possibility of higher levels of blood sugars while on those medications. Type 1 diabetes, is an autoimmune disorder, caused by heredity that destroys the Beta cells that are found in the islets of Langerhans within the pancreas. With Type 1 diabetes antibodies that are produced in white blood cells are hard wired to attack beta cells as though they were a pathogen and destroy the beta cells needed to produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is not an autoimmune disorder. Type 2occurs when the cells become resistant to insulin produced by the pancreas, causing an increase of sugar in the blood stream or the pancreas simply can't make enough insulin. With Type 2 there are various causes: heredity, obesity, inactivity, poor nutrition and many other factors or a combination of those factors may cause the onset of type 2 diabetes. Regardlesshydrochlorothiazide maybe one of many factors that lead to diabetes but it alone will not cause type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

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