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Can High Sugar Levels Cause Fainting?

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

DIABETES SAFETY FIRST! Recognizing and Preventing Low Blood Sugar Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Low blood sugar feels different to different people, so learn to know y Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

Have You Experienced Dizziness Related to Your Diabetes? Dizziness is not a pleasant feeling. It can strike unexpectedly anytime, anywhere, leaving you unable to carry on with everyday tasks. This lightheaded sensation is typically accompanied by a sudden flush of heat and often seems to occur at the most inconvenient time possible, which can be embarrassing. As awkward as sudden dizziness can be, you should always alert someone nearby to the fact that you have diabetes. Feeling lightheaded can be the first warning that your blood glucose levels are awry, and you want someone close knowing how to help you. What Causes Dizziness? There are many reasons why someone might feel dizzy, not all of them related to diabetes. Maybe the room is too hot, or the person feeling dizzy is overdressed or dehydrated. Sometimes certain medications, an ear infection or a migraine can cause dizziness. Stress can also bring on the room-spinning feeling or sensation you may faint. If dizziness often strikes after you sit or stand up suddenly, but goes away when you sit or lie down, it is probably due to postural hypertension (a sudden drop in blood pressure), which is quite common in older people. With dizziness caused by stress or heat, a cool glass of water or a bit of fresh air will help you recover completely within a very short time. Maybe a trip to your doctor is in order if you suspect your medication or an ear infection is to blame. But since there is a chance your body is using dizziness as an early warning system, you should always check your blood sugar levels if you self-test, or get them checked if dizzy spells become frequent if you don’t test your sugar levels with finger prick testing. Dizziness and Blood Glucose Levels As is often the case with fairly vague symptoms like d Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Dizziness In The Morning

High Blood Sugar And Dizziness In The Morning

A high blood sugar level due to diabetes or other situations can cause a variety of symptoms such as dizziness, and it can even lead to blindness, nerve damage, heart disease and other chronic problems. Morning can be a common time for high blood sugar levels. Understanding what causes a spike in blood glucose and knowing what steps to take to lower it can help you to prevent complications. If your blood sugar level is high in the morning most of the time, it is important to speak with your physician. Video of the Day Your blood sugar level naturally fluctuates throughout the day. The foods you eat, your level of physical activity, stress, illnesses and medications can make your blood sugar levels rise and fall. In general, a normal fasting blood glucose level is below 100 mg/dL, the National Diabetes Education Program says. Once your level reaches between 100 mg/dL and 125 mg/dL, you may be diagnosed with prediabetes. If your level climbs over 125 mg/dL on more than one testing occasion, you may have diabetes. The medical term for a high level of blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Depending on the cause, it can take hours or days for your blood sugar levels to become so high that you develop symptoms. Symptoms of high blood sugar include not only dizziness but dry mouth, thirst, frequent urination, blurry vision, fatigue, confusion and increased appetite, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics reports. In general, the more severe your symptoms, the higher your blood sugar levels are. If you are having strong dizzy spells, seek medical attention. Both those with and without diabetes can experience "dawn phenomenon," and those with diabetes can experience the "Somogyi effect." During the early evening, insulin -- whether produced by the body or taken as medication -- works Continue reading >>

10 Common Health Reasons For Fainting

10 Common Health Reasons For Fainting

Home Your Health 10 Common Health Reasons for Fainting By: Lauren MacDonald on Monday, March 2nd Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels and requires lifestyle changes and often medication. People with diabetes are at risk of experiencing a drop in their blood glucose levels, as maintaining these levels can be difficult. People with Type 1 diabetes require insulin injections for the rest of their lives and must follow a special diet to manage the disease. Its much less common than Type 2 diabetes, which can often be managed through diet, exercise, and regular monitoring of blood glucose levels. Although type 2 diabetes is much more common, fainting can occur for both types. When a diabetic stands up too quickly or doesnt eat enough, the risk of fainting increases. Taking too much insulin causes a severe drop in blood sugar that can cause fainting, and high blood sugar levels can do this as well. People who dont know they have diabetes could suffer from fainting spells, and this symptom could help your doctor identify or diagnose diabetes. With so much emphasis placed on detoxing your body (which is not really a thing), how about focusing more on getting less of the screens in front of you all day? Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can be very scary, and for good reason: failing to make important lifestyle -- and especially diet-based -- changes can result in serious... Many people live with chronic kidney disease, and on the verge of kidney failure, without even realizing there is an issue. You might've heard of some of these foods, or have seen them at your local grocery store, but have paid no mind to them. This illness has the word "flu" in it, but let's be clear it's not the same thing as influenza, and is not caused by the same virus as flu. We've all seen thos Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Family Health Online | Family Health Magazine |first Aid | Fainting, Diabetes Emergency And Convulsions - First Aid In Cases Of Collapse

Family Health Online | Family Health Magazine |first Aid | Fainting, Diabetes Emergency And Convulsions - First Aid In Cases Of Collapse

Fainting, Diabetes Emergency and Convulsions Imagine that you are standing in line at the bank and the person ahead of you collapses. You dont know the person and have no idea what medical problems there might be. Is it a fainting spell, or something more serious such as a diabetic emergency, a seizure or a convulsion? These conditions often appear similar but they are not treated in the same way. If you understand the differences, you will know the first aid to use until medical help arrives. In all cases your first action should be to check for a medic alert device, usually worn at the neck or wrist, that will assist you in quickly identifying the problem. Fainting (syncope) is a temporary loss of consciousness due to insufficient oxygen reaching the brain. It often results from a slowing of the heartbeat and a fall in blood pressure which reduce blood flow to the brain. Sweating, dizziness, nausea, dimmed vision, ringing in the ears and weakness usually precede fainting spells. These attacks are often caused by pain, shock, stress, fear or by being in a stuffy atmosphere with little oxygen. Fainting may also occur when a person stands still for a long time or suddenly stands up. This is a result of pooling in the legs (postural hypotension) and a resultant drop in blood pressure. This type of fainting is common in the elderly and in those suffering from diabetes mellitus or taking certain medications. On occasion, fainting episodes may also be associated with temporary speaking difficulty or weakness in the limbs. Causes, signs and symptoms of diabetic emergencies Do not confuse a diabetic emergency with drunkenness. Many of the behaviour signs are the same, but a person having a diabetic emergency needs immediate medical help. Check the signs and look for a medical Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

Tweet Because diabetes is such a diverse disease with many complications, it can cause dizziness in many ways by affecting different parts of the body. Dizziness is an episode of unsteadiness and unbalance as a result of something affecting the brain or ears. However, dizziness can also be a symptom of many things other than diabetes. So if you are experiencing recurrent dizzy spells, you should contact your doctor who will be able to diagnose the cause. Causes of dizziness A dizzy spell can be brought on by many things, but in cases of diabetes the most common causes are: Low blood pressure Dizziness can be cause by the heart's inability to pump blood up to the brain sufficiently, especially when suddenly standing up from a sitting or a lying position. As the blood momentarily fails to reach the brain, a spinning sensation, unsteadiness or even fainting can occur. Dehydration High blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can cause polyuria, which in turn can lead to dehydration by passing too much fluid out of the body in an attempt to remove excess glucose. With low levels of water in the body, the brain may struggle to function correctly and cause light headedness. Hypoglycemia Having a low amount of sugar in your blood (hypoglycemia) can lead to dizziness by causing the brain cells to malfunction. Certain medications Some medications, including those used to treat people with diabetes, can cause dizzy spells. The instruction leaflet that comes with a medicine will list any possible side effects of the drug. When to see your doctor If you are suffering from bouts of dizziness that are recurrent or persistent you should go and see a doctor. They will likely ask questions to gauge whether there is a pattern to the feelings of dizziness, so keeping a record of dizzy spells pr Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Make You Faint?

How Can Diabetes Make You Faint?

Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia, or an abnormally low level of glucose in the blood, can lead to fainting. When a person with diabetes takes too much insulin or medication or doesn't enough eat enough, he may inadvertently lower his level of glucose (sugar) to a dangerous level. According to Your Total Health, this may cause loss of consciousness, resulting in a fainting spell. The brain needs glucose for nourishment, and the body needs adequate levels to regulate blood pressure. Fainting happens when the brain is deprived or when blood pressure drops too low, and the problem is compounded with the overrelease of adrenalin and cortisol in reaction to the lack of glucose. Hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia, or an abnormally high level of glucose in the blood, can lead to fainting and diabetic coma. When someone with diabetes eats too much of an unhealthy food or skips her medication or insulin injection, her blood sugar can rise to a dangerous level. Your Total Health warns that this may cause her to faint and slip into a diabetic coma. Prior to fainting, she will appear to be confused and possibly incoherent. Cardiac Problems According to Your Total Health, cardiac problems are one of the long-term side effects of diabetes. Fainting can be a symptom of many of these heart-related conditions because they often interrupt the flow of blood to a person's brain. When someone with diabetes faints and her glucose levels are normal, she should be evaluated for possible heart problems that could be the underlying cause. Nerve Damage Nerve damage is a common long-term effect of diabetes. Your Total Health says that if this damage is neurological, it can trigger fainting spells in the affected person because of the disturbance to the brain's proper function. Based in Kissimmee, Fla., Barb Nefe Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Causes

Causes

Fainting (syncope) is caused by a temporary reduction in blood flow to the brain. Blood flow to the brain can be interrupted for a number of reasons. The different causes of fainting are explained below. A trigger Fainting is most commonly caused by a temporary glitch in the autonomic nervous system. This is sometimes known as neurally mediated syncope. The autonomic nervous system is made up of the brain, nerves and spinal cord. It regulates automatic bodily functions, such as heart rate and blood pressure. An external trigger can temporarily cause the autonomic nervous system to stop working properly, resulting in a fall in blood pressure and fainting. The trigger may also cause your heartbeat to slow down or pause for a few seconds, resulting in a temporary interruption to the brain's blood supply. This is called vasovagal syncope. The trigger may be: an unpleasant sight heat sudden pain sneezing laughing sitting or standing up suddenly – known as postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) Low blood pressure when you stand up Fainting can also be caused by a fall in blood pressure when you stand up. This is called orthostatic hypotension, and tends to affect older people, particularly those aged over 65. It's a common cause of falls in older people. When you stand up after sitting or lying down, gravity pulls blood down into your legs, which reduces your blood pressure. The nervous system usually counteracts this by making your heart beat faster and narrowing your blood vessels. This stabilises your blood pressure. However, in cases of orthostatic hypotension, this doesn't happen, leading to the brain's blood supply being interrupted and causing you to faint. Possible triggers of orthostatic hypotension include: dehydration – if you're dehydrated, the amount of fluid i Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes And Dizziness

Understanding Diabetes And Dizziness

Identifying the Source and Treating Feelings of Dizziness If you’ve ever felt suddenly unsteady, lightheaded or faint, you’re not alone. Dizziness is one of the many symptoms that plague diabetics, and though it may not be as pressing as a hypoglycemic episode or neurological emergency, you shouldn’t ignore your dizzy spell. So, what causes dizziness? Dizzy feelings start in the brain, but the brain isn’t always to blame. In fact, dizziness can be a consequences of a variety of malfunctions, from blood pressure to oxygen levels. Learn where your dizziness may be coming from, and how you and your doctor can stop it for good. How Diabetes Can Leave You Lightheaded Your body relies on a balance of chemicals, hormones and nutrients to stay energized and to function well. Diabetes interferes with a number of natural processes (most notably, your ability to metabolize glucose), and that can throw things way off balance. Dizziness is a sign you may need to pay more attention to managing your diabetes symptoms in order to restore the harmony between all the systems in your body. In many cases, a lightheaded, dizzy or faint feeling can be traced to: Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar is one of the most common causes for dizziness among diabetics, but luckily, it’s quite treatable. The problem stems from a lack of glucose in your brain, which causes it to malfunction. Getting a burst of sugar into the bloodstream with a glucose tablet or sugary food should take care of the dizziness. When the faint feeling comes with sweating, confusion, and lack of muscle control, it’s a serious situation that demands quick and aggressive treatment. Hyperglycemia When your blood sugar climbs too high, your body tries to get rid of the excess glucose through frequent urination (polyuria), a Continue reading >>

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