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Can High Stress Cause Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

How Stress Affects Blood Glucose Levels

How Stress Affects Blood Glucose Levels

Stress can increase your blood glucose levels. Stress can also cause you to turn to unhealthful behaviors such as overeating, eating unhealthful foods or smoking. Managing your stress and relaxing more will help you and your baby stay as healthy as possible. Identify sources of stress Being pregnant, preparing for a new baby and learning to manage gestational diabetes are stressful things on their own. But you also lead a life in the real world, with all it stresses and tensions. Stress has many sources. Name some of your main sources of stress and see if you can identify an action to reduce or eliminate complications of gestational diabetes for you and your baby. You might find that simply learning as much as you can about gestational diabetes will relieve much of your worry. How to reduce your stress level Find opportunities to rest: sit, lie down, put your feet up. Talk to friends, family and your partner about your concerns and stresses. Lower your expectations of yourself. The house can be messy, the laundry can fall behind and you can be less than perfect. You're helping your baby grow and be healthy, and that's your first priority. Get enough sleep. Ask for help in getting tasks done. Ask a friend to drive, a sister to help set up the nursery, your partner to grocery shop. If possible, hire out tasks like yard work and house cleaning during your pregnancy. Know and accept your limits. Let friends and family know that for now, you have to take special care of yourself and your baby. When you need rest. excuse yourself and go rest. When you feel overwhelmed, take on less. Be physically active every day. It's a great stress reliever. Add relaxation to each day. Listen to your favorite music at work. Take a bubble bath. Close your eyes and do nothing except breathe d Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High blood sugar levels are where your blood sugar levels go over YOUR test target. So that is anything 0.1mmol/l over your target e.g. if your target is 7.8mmol and you get 7.9mmol/l, this is classed as an over target reading or high blood sugar level. Bearing in mind that test targets vary all over the UK and Ireland, what is classed as a high reading for one person, maybe still within target levels for someone else. What to do if you get high blood sugar levels Re-test your blood sugar levels Re-wash your hands in JUST water and re-test your blood sugar levels. It is very easy to touch something, even your face or hair and contaminate our hands before testing. Many soaps and sanitisers can have ingredients which leave residue on the skin which can give false high readings and so it is important to wash hands in just water before re-testing. If levels are still high Record all the results so that your diabetes team can review them and what you ate so that you can review what may have caused the spike in your blood sugar levels. Drink plenty of water and walk or be as active as possible for 20 mins or longer. Drinking water helps to flush excess sugars from the body and exercise has an insulin type effect on the body. Communicate with your team Each diabetes team may give different recommendations as to when to contact them, but the general guidance given and also what we recommend is to contact your team after 3 over target readings within a week. Don't wait until your next scheduled appointment if you're getting over target readings, give your team a call to discuss it with them. Some teams will ask you to come in earlier to start medication or insulin, others may fax a prescription through to your GP surgery or Pharmacy for you to collect and start. Other teams may Continue reading >>

Managing Stress When You Have Diabetes

Managing Stress When You Have Diabetes

Stress can hamper your diabetes care. For instance, if you have so much on your mind that you skip meals or forget to take your medicines, that will affect your blood sugar level. Life will always have challenges and setbacks, but you have the power to choose how you respond to it. Use these six tips as a start. 1. Keep a positive attitude. When things seem to be going wrong, it's easier to see the bad instead of the good. Find something to appreciate in each important area of your life, such as your family, friends, work, and health. That perspective can help you get through tough times. 2. Be kind to yourself. Do you expect too much from yourself? It's OK to say "no" to things that you don't really want or need to do. 3. Accept what you can't change. Ask yourself these three questions: "Will this be important 2 years from now?" "Do I have control over these circumstances?" "Can I change my situation?" If you can make things better, go for it. If not, is there a different way to handle it that would be better for you? 4. Talk to someone. You could confide in a trusted family member or close friend. There are also professionals who can listen and help you find solutions. Ask your doctor for recommendations if you'd like to see a psychologist or counselor. 5. Tap the power of exercise. You can blow off steam with hard exercise, recharge on a hike, or do a relaxing mind-body activity like yoga or tai chi. You'll feel better. 6. Take time to unwind. Practice muscle relaxation, deep breathing, meditation, or visualization. Your doctor may know of classes or programs that teach these skills. You can also check for apps that do that. Continue reading >>

Did My High Stress Level Cause Gestational Diabetes?

Did My High Stress Level Cause Gestational Diabetes?

Did my high stress level cause Gestational Diabetes? I was diagnosed while on vacation with a mild form of Gestational Diabetes after being 14 points over on 2 hour; fasting and 1 hour were fine though. While waiting to take blood for 2 hour I received a couple very stressful emails from my boss I was responding to. Not to mention, I had been VERY stressed the last three weeks bc of work - multiple breakdowns, toxic boss, high pressure environment etc. I am wondering A. if my current stress levels impacted the test. B if stress had brought on GD to begin with. From what I know about GD, it happens because the placenta taps into your blood stream and basically takes whatever it needs from it. It can also control your blood sugar levels if it needs to, which is why you only have diabetes during pregnancy. So I dont think it has much to do with your stress levels and more to do with how your body responds to the needs of the placenta? I could be wrong though, I didnt have GD with my first. I do know that the phlebotomist who took my blood told me youre more likely to pass if you fast before you get it done. Did you fast before the 2 hour? Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

So you’ve had the Glucose Tolerance Test, or maybe you’ve been monitoring you’re blood sugar levels at home, and your blood sugar readings were high. You have been given a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. If your experience was anything like mine, an Obstetrician or midwife gave you a pamphlet on ‘Diabetes and Pregnancy’, referred you to a dietician and endocrinologist for management, and then sent on your way. And now you’re at home, and all the questions you didn’t think to ask are flooding in… What the heck is it? And what does it mean? Will my baby be alright? Do I need a caesarean? Will I need to be on insulin? What can I eat? Do I have to stop eating CHOCOLATE?!?!?! There is some debate against the use of routine testing to diagnose Gestational Diabetes, and also questioning about giving the diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes as a label on pregnant women. Dr. Sarah Buckley recommends avoiding routine testing for Gestational Diabetes for most women. Henci Goer and Dr Michael Odent are among many pregnancy and childbirth professionals who argue against diagnosing women with gestational diabetes, citing unnecessary stress and interventions as one of the risks of the Gestational Diabetes diagnosis. Nevertheless, whether you want to call it Gestational Diabetes or Pregnancy-Induced Insulin Resistance, or just high blood sugar levels in pregnancy, some women do have elevated blood sugar levels and need some extra help. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM or GD) is described as a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, and usually goes away 4-6 weeks postpartum. In a pregnant woman without Gestational Diabetes, the body works ‘as usual’. You eat, your stomach breaks down your food, you start to digest it, and the glucose from the carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Helping A Partner With Gestational Diabetes

Helping A Partner With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes treatment involves exercise, nutrition, and rest — and a supportive partner can help with all of these. If your partner has gestational diabetes, she may have her hands full managing her nutrition, exercising regularly, and keeping track of her blood sugar and doctor visits. Add this to all the normal stresses that go along with being pregnant, and it should be obvious that she could use your help. "During my wife's first pregnancy she probably had mild gestational diabetes, but during the second pregnancy it was more obvious and she needed a lot more help," recalls Bill Taylor of Danbury, Conn. "I learned to think of managing pregnancy as a team effort. I went along on all the doctor visits that I could and we learned how to manage gestational diabetes together." Helping With Gestational Diabetes Treatment Keeping gestational diabetes under control requires a combination of exercise, healthy eating, frequent blood sugar testing, and in some cases, medications to control blood sugar. The goal of treatment is to maintain a relatively normal and constant blood sugar level. All this requires education about gestational diabetes and constant vigilance to make sure treatment is working. Partners can be a big help in this process. Here’s how: Education. Your partner will need to work closely with her doctors and diabetes educators to learn about managing gestational diabetes. There is a lot to learn. As a partner, you should also know when glucose testing should be done and what the target readings are. Testing her blood sugar should be done at certain times of the day to see if exercise and diet are keeping the blood sugar under control. You can help by reminding your partner when to check and helping her keep track of all the numbers. Nutrition. Peo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Stress During Pregnancy Increases Risk For Preterm Birth, Gestational Diabetes, Depression

Stress During Pregnancy Increases Risk For Preterm Birth, Gestational Diabetes, Depression

Pregnancy is typically a very exciting time in a woman’s life. The anticipation of meeting your baby for the first time and helping them develop into a happy, healthy child is definitely a cause for celebration! However, bringing a new life into the world can come with some amount of stress. Hormone levels are fluctuating, your body is changing, not to mention you are dealing with life’s everyday stressors of managing relationships, work and home environments. Obviously, making sure that your baby gets a healthy start in life is one of your biggest priorities. Research points to the fact that that taking care to manage stress levels throughout pregnancy is one of the most important things a mother can do to set their baby up for developmental success. The Negative Effects of Stress on Baby A recent study investigated the connection between a mother’s mental and physical stress levels and the likelihood of preterm birth. A group of healthy women were followed throughout their pregnancy. Perceived stress and anxiety levels as well as measurements of the stress hormone, cortisol, were monitored throughout the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The study concluded that women with higher stress levels in the second trimester had corresponding elevated cortisol concentrations, which strongly predisposed them and their child to preterm birth. Therefore, being able to properly identify and resolve possible early pregnancy stressors may diffuse a woman’s physical response of cortisol output to stress and ultimately help prevent preterm birth. What is preterm birth and why is it significant? Preterm birth is the birth of an infant before the expected 37 weeks of pregnancy. During the final weeks and months of pregnancy, a baby goes through important growth a Continue reading >>

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

A risk means there is a chance that something might happen. With every pregnancy there are some risks, but if you have gestational diabetes your risks of some things will be increased. Managing your blood sugar level brings these risks right down again though and most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. These things are very unlikely to happen to you, but understanding the risks may help you see why it is important that you follow your healthcare team’s advice. The risks linked to gestational diabetes are caused by blood glucose levels being too high. If you can keep your blood glucose as close as possible to the ideal level, your risks will be reduced. Risk of having a large baby (macrosomia) If your blood glucose level is high, it can cause high blood glucose levels in your baby. Your baby will produce more insulin in response, just like you do. This can make your baby grow larger than normal. This is called macrosomia. Babies weighing more than 4kg (8lb 8oz) at birth are called macrosomic. Macrosomia increases the risk of: Birth trauma - either the mother or baby can be affected when it is difficult for the baby to be born. Trauma may include physical symptoms, such as bone fractures or nerve damage for the baby, or tearing and severe bleeding for the mother as well as psychological distress. Shoulder dystocia - where the baby’s shoulder is stuck in your pelvis once the head has been born. This can squash the umbilical cord, so the team need to use additional interventions to deliver the baby quickly and safely. It means you may have labour induced early or to have a caesarean section so that your baby is born safely. Your baby's weight will be monitored carefully in pregnancy to see whether these interventions are needed. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Is A Rising Pregnancy Risk - The New York Times

Gestational Diabetes Is A Rising Pregnancy Risk - The New York Times

Health |Diabetes Is a Risk in Pregnancy That Carries Risks Beyond Elise Bloustein, always slender and healthy, was 38 when she became pregnant with her first child in 1990. Her joy was tempered by the results of tests that revealed two problems: anemia and gestational diabetes , which Ms. Bloustein believes may have been caused by stress associated with the deaths of her parents. Regardless of the cause, the conditions required close attention to what she ate. The doctor sent her to a nutritionist who put her on a diabetes diet and told her to self-test her blood sugar levels several times a day. The goal was to keep her blood sugar from spiking by eating lots of fiber -rich foods and limiting simple and refined carbohydrates . Frequent sonograms were done to monitor the babys growth and prevent a stillbirth, a risk of gestational diabetes. Ultimately, the baby was born normal and healthy, weighing seven pounds. But Ms. Bloustein was cautioned that gestational diabetes could recur in a future pregnancy (it didnt) and that she was at high risk of later developing mature-onset (now called Type 2) diabetes . So far, 18 years later, theres no sign of diabetes, Ms. Bloustein, now 55, said in an interview. But its very much in my mind, and I watch my diet and my weight and have an annual physical. In the years since Ms. Blousteins first pregnancy, the incidence of gestational diabetes has nearly doubled, a result of the rise in prepregnancy weight among American women, Dr. Boyd E. Metzger, an endocrinologist at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said in an interview. At the same time, much has been learned about the disorder and its possible effects on newborns and their mothers. It is now known, for example, that even small blood-sugar abnormalities can ca Continue reading >>

Psychological Stress Associated With Diabetes During Pregnancy: A Pilot Study.

Psychological Stress Associated With Diabetes During Pregnancy: A Pilot Study.

Psychological stress associated with diabetes during pregnancy: a pilot study. Lydon K(1), Dunne FP, Owens L, Avalos G, Sarma KM, O'Connor C, Nestor L, McGuire BE. (1)School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 12% of women. Theimpact of a diagnosis of GDM may lead to increased stress in pregnancy due to thedemands of adherence to a treatment regimen and maternal concern about adverseoutcomes for the mother and baby. We examined the psychosocial profile of 25women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and compared them to 25non-diabetic pregnant women. Measures administered included the PregnancyExperiences Scale (PES), the Depression, Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS), the ProblemAreas in Diabetes Scale (PAID-5) and the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS).The GDM group reported a significantly greater ratio of pregnancy 'hassles' topregnancy 'uplifts'. The GDM group also had a significantly higher Depressionscore and were twice as likely to score above the cut-off for possibledepression. Elevated levels of diabetes-related distress were found in 40% ofwomen with GDM. In addition, the GDM group reported less social support fromoutside the family. Our preliminary study indicates that the experience of GDMappears to be associated with increased psychological distress in comparison tothe experience of non-diabetic pregnant women. This may indicate the need forpsychological screening in GDM and the provision of psychological support in somecases. Continue reading >>

How Stress Affects Blood Sugar Levels

How Stress Affects Blood Sugar Levels

Two types of stress can change blood sugar levels: Physical stress Mental or emotional stress Each type of stress affects blood sugar levels differently. Physical stress generally causes blood sugar levels to increase. Physical stress includes: Illness Surgery Injury Mental or emotional stress has mixed effects, depending on the type of diabetes you have: Type 1 diabetes: Mental stress can increase or decrease blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes: Mental stress generally increases blood sugar levels. Stress also can affect your blood sugar levels indirectly by causing you to forget about your regular diabetes care routine. When you're stressed out, you might: Exercise more or less Eat more or less Eat less healthy foods Not test your blood sugar level as often Forget or delay a dose of medication and/or insulin mental stress can affect your blood sugar levels Use your diabetes logbook to discover if mental stress affects your blood sugar levels, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes are very sensitive to stress. It causes the body to produce especially high levels of stress hormones, which drive blood sugar levels up. follow these steps to find out if your blood sugar levels are affected by mental stress: Rate your stress level on a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 indicates the lowest stress level and 10 the highest; record your stress level in your logbook. Test your glucose using your home monitor and enter the result. After a week or two, study your results to see if there is a pattern or relationship between your stress level and your blood sugar levels. 3 ways to reduce mental stress Teach yourself to relax when under stress using deep-breathing exercises or techniques you learn in a stress-management class. Evaluate your schedule and de Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Home » About Diabetes » Pregnancy » Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is the type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Like other forms od diabetes, gestational diabetes affects the way the body uses the glucose [sugar] in the blood and as a result the blood sugars rise too high. The glucose in the blood is the body’s main source of energy. If gestational diabetes is untreated or uncontrolled, it can result in a variety of health problems for both that mother and baby. So it is important that a treatment plan is worked out to keep blood sugars within the normal range. The good news is that controlling blood sugars can help to ensure a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Signs and Symptoms Most women do not have any signs or symptoms of gestational diabetes but your healthcare professional will check for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. When signs and symptoms do occur they include: Excessive thirst Increased urination. About 3 to 5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. The Causes of Gestational Diabetes Normal metabolism Normally during digestion the body breaks down the carbohydrates you eat into simple sugars [glucose] and this glucose is absorbed into the blood and transported around the body by the blood vessel system to provide the energy needed for all our activities. This process cannot take place without insulin. Insulin is produced in the pancreas, a gland behind the stomach, and helps the glucose to pass into the cells to provide energy and maintains normal levels of glucose in the blood. The liver also plays a part in maintaining normal blood glucose levels. When there is more glucose in the cells than your body needs for energy, it is removed from the blood and stored it in the liver Continue reading >>

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