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Can High Blood Sugar Make You Have Heart Palpitations?

Diabetes And Palpitations

Diabetes And Palpitations

Learn all about diagnosis, risk factors, signs and symptoms of diabetes including heart palpitations, rapid heartbeat, dizzy, frequent urination at night in this article. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic nutritional disorder in which the body is unable to properly control the amount of sugar in the blood. It is characterized by an abnormally elevated level of blood glucose and by the excretion of the excess glucose in the urine. It results from an absolute or relative lack of insulin which leads to abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism as well as in the metabolism of protein and fat. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use the hormone insulin, made in the pancreas, to help them regulate blood sugar levels. People with diabetes cannot control the sugar in the blood. This can be caused by too little insulin in the body, by the inability to use insulin or both of these. Diabetes significantly raises the risk of heart disease and stroke, blindness and kidney failure. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to death. Diabetes may manifest in various symptoms of diabetes including rapid heartbeat, dizzy, frequent urination at night, paleness, feel thirsty and hungry most of the time. Diagnosis Most sufferers do not experience any signs and symptoms of diabetes thus the best way to diagnose a diabetes is through medical tests. Diabetes can be easily diagnosed using a fasting blood glucose level test and the two-hour postprandial, which is after a meal. Diabetes is diagnosed if the test shows blood glucose is higher than 126 mg/dL on two different tests. If levels are between 100 and 126 mg/dL, this condition will be referred to as impaired fasting glucose or pre-diabetes and should be consider Continue reading >>

12 Potential Reasons You're Having Heart Palpitations

12 Potential Reasons You're Having Heart Palpitations

If you’ve ever experienced a heart palpitation, you know that the feeling of having a fast, fluttering, or pounding heart is scary, to say the least. But despite the freakiness, experts say heart palpitations happen pretty often—and they’re usually not dangerous or a sign of your impending doom. “They’re very common,” Malissa Wood, M.D., co-director of the Corrigan Women's Heart Health Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, tells SELF. “Most people will have palpitations at some point in their lives, even if [the palpitations] are short-lived." Nicole Weinberg, M.D., a cardiologist at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, agrees, telling SELF that heart palpitations are “extremely common” in young women. According to the Mayo Clinic, heart palpitations can feel like your heart is skipping beats, fluttering, beating too fast, or pumping harder than usual. “If you feel your heart beating at all, that can be a palpitation,” Wood explains. You might feel heart palpitations in your throat, neck, or chest, and they can occur when you’re active or resting, and whether you’re standing, sitting, or lying down, the Mayo Clinic says. It’s not just a sensation that your heart is skipping beats or beating too fast—your heart is actually doing this, Weinberg says, noting that there can be several reasons for it. A major cause of heart palpitations in young women is having too much caffeine, she says. Wood agrees: “That second or third latte of the morning can bring out extra beats.” Stress and anxiety are also big causes of heart palpitations, Wood says. “When your adrenaline level goes up, it makes you feel the palpitations because your heart is beating stronger or faster,” she explains. Lack of sleep can also be Continue reading >>

Palpitations After Eating Carbs Or Sugar

Palpitations After Eating Carbs Or Sugar

Palpitations are sensations in your chest, neck or throat that feel as though your heart is racing or pounding. They are not typically serious, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, but they can indicate medical conditions in need of treatment. Although not known to cause palpitations directly, sugar and other carbohydrate sources might contribute to your symptoms. For ensured wellness, seek guidance from your doctor. Causes of heart palpitations can include emotions, such as anxiety, stress and fear; medications, such as that for asthma and high blood pressure; diet pills; nicotine; exercise and medical conditions, such as anemia, hypoglycemia and hyperthyroidism, or an over-active thyroid gland. Although anyone can experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, it is most prevalent among people with diabetes, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. If you have diabetes and consume high-glycemic foods, which have a significant impact on your blood sugar, your risk increases for blood sugar imbalances and related heart palpitations. Particularly high-glycemic foods include candy, dates, doughnuts, potatoes and low-fiber cereals, such as corn flakes. If you have an eating disorder – something common with anxiety disorders, according to the Anxiety Disorders Association of America – you might experience heart palpitations after eating carbohydrate-rich foods out fear of resultant weight-gain. Palpitations also might be a symptom of hyperthyroidism, which can worsen after eating refined foods, such as white bread and sugar. In addition to proper treatment for any underlying condition, making dietary changes that normalize your blood sugar levels and stopping caffeine use can help minimize heart palpitations, according to women's health exper Continue reading >>

Can Sugar Cause Heart Palpitations?

Can Sugar Cause Heart Palpitations?

Sugar consumption should not cause heart palpitations. Heart palpitations are usually caused by medications, like the decongestants we take for colds or drinks that contain caffeine. Sometimes stress can make your heart beat faster and occasionally, it might even skip a beat. Palpitations are often caused by consumption of caffeine, alcohol, and decongestants. Tobacco use can also cause palpitations. Sugar consumption in most people does not cause palpitations. However, if a person has low blood sugar episodes, consumption of too much simple sugar can cause a strong insulin (insulin helps move glucose into cells to be used for energy) response and drop the blood sugar too rapidly. This results in a reaction of the body similar to stress. The heart rate will increase, the person will be shaky, clammy and feel faint. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

What Is Hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia may be described as an excess of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Your endocrine system regulates the amount of sugar that is stored and used for energy. It is important in brain cell function, and energy levels. Since the sugar that you consume in your diet is either used or stored, certain conditions and disorders may cause you to have difficulty processing and storing blood glucose, resulting in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. One hormone that is important to the normal storing and processing of sugar is insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is made in the pancreas that is responsible for maintaining "normal" blood sugar levels. If you have a problem with your pancreas, then you may have increased blood sugar levels. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels higher than these might indicate hyperglycemia. Causes of Hyperglycemia: Diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes, have diabetes of adult onset (Diabetes type 2). You are more at risk for developing diabetes if you are older, extremely overweight (obese), if you have a family history of diabetes (parents, siblings), and if you are of African-American, Hispanic American, or Native-American heritage. People who have diabetes have an underproduction of the hormone, insulin, which lowers your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, you will have problems with elevated blood sugar levels. If you develop diabetes type 2, and you are an adult, your healthcare provider may prescribe medications in a pill form, which allow your body to process insulin that is needed for maintaining "normal" blood glucose levels. It is likely that your pancreas is producing enough insulin, but your body is resistant to the insulin, a Continue reading >>

Skipping A Beat — The Surprise Of Heart Palpitations

Skipping A Beat — The Surprise Of Heart Palpitations

Does your heart unexpectedly start to race or pound, or feel like it keeps skipping beats? These sensations are called palpitations. For most people, heart palpitations are a once-in-a-blue-moon occurrence. Others have dozens a day, sometimes so strong that they feel like a heart attack. Most palpitations are caused by a harmless hiccup in the heart's rhythm. A few reflect a problem in the heart or elsewhere in the body. Doctors can be quick to attribute palpitations to anxiety, depression, or some other emotional or psychological problem. Although sometimes that's right, it's important to first rule out harmful heart rhythms and other physical causes. Symptoms of palpitations Different people experience heart palpitations in different ways. Palpitations can feel like the heart is fluttering, throbbing, flip-flopping, murmuring, or pounding. They can also feel like the heart skips a beat. Some people feel palpitations as a pounding in the chest or neck; others feel them as a general sense of unease. Common triggers of heart palpitations Palpitations can appear out of the blue and disappear just as suddenly. They can be linked with certain activities, events, or emotions. Exercise and physical activity can generate palpitations, as can anxiety or stress. Some people notice their heart skipping a beat when they are drifting off to sleep; others, when they stand up after bending over. Common triggers of palpitations include: stress, anxiety, or panic dehydration low potassium low blood sugar too much caffeine, chocolate, or alcohol nicotine exercise standing up swallowing fever prior heart attack mitral valve prolapse anemia overactive thyroid pregnancy menopause heartburn (acid reflux) drugs and medications such as cocaine, amphetamines, diet pills, some cough and cold re Continue reading >>

3 Foods That Cause Heart Palpitations

3 Foods That Cause Heart Palpitations

Often when I write about the best and worst foods for the heart, I talk in the context of heart-healing foods that are good to eat, as well as foods that should be avoided because they fan the flames of inflammation. Those discussions focus on how the things we eat and drink every day affect heart health over the long haul. Today, though, I want to shift gears and focus on foods (including beverages) that can have more immediate and noticeable impacts on the heart—starting with foods that can cause heart palpitations. In this article I’ll explore: And be sure to check out the latest (and last) article in my heartbeat series: In my days of active practice, one of the most common consultations I used to have was with patients who came in because they didn’t feel like their hearts were beating properly anymore. Some described skipped beats. Others, … Continue reading Why Foods Cause Heart Palpitations Feeling palpitations after eating is a relatively common experience, which tends to occur when a substance in your food or drink—or your body’s natural biochemical response to that substance—jolts the heart’s electrical system and causes fluttering sensations, skipped beats, or a feeling that your heart is beating too hard or too fast. Coffee drinkers, think about the last time you drank one cup too many. You know what I mean! If your heart is healthy and you have no history of arrhythmia or heart disease—and you’re not experiencing any other symptoms—there’s little need to worry about an occasional episode of these irregular beats. For people who do have arrhythmias or cardiac issues, however, it’s a different story. Palpitations caused by food can cause an existing disruption in your heart’s rhythm to escalate, and potentially lead to a major eve Continue reading >>

Arrhythmia

Arrhythmia

An irregular heartbeat. People with diabetes are at greater risk for developing a type of arrhythmia called atrial fibrillation. The heart has four chambers — two upper chambers, called atria, and two lower chambers, called ventricles. During a normal heartbeat, a complex set of electrical signals causes the atria to contract, sending blood into the ventricles, and then causes the ventricles to contract, sending blood to the lungs and the rest of the body. When the electrical impulses that coordinate heartbeats don’t work properly, the result is an arrhythmia. The risk of developing an arrhythmia increases with age; arrhythmias are common in older adults, and most serious arrhythmias affect people over the age of 60. Other risk factors for arrhythmia include having had a heart attack or heart failure — both of which indicate damage to the heart muscle — leaking or narrowed heart valves, and congenital heart defects. Other conditions that can increase the risk include high blood pressure, infections that damage the heart, diabetes, sleep apnea (in which breathing briefly and repeatedly stops during sleep), and an overactive or underactive thyroid gland. There are three common types of arrhythmias. Supraventricular arrhythmias originate in the atria or the AV node, a tiny area of tissue that allows electrical signals to pass between the atria and the ventricles. Types of supraventricular arrhythmias include premature beats, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is premature beats, which usually are harmless and cause no symptoms. When symptoms occur, they usually take the form of a feeling of fluttering in the chest or a skipped beat. Other supraventricular arrhythmias fall under the ca Continue reading >>

Understanding Heart Palpitations After Eating

Understanding Heart Palpitations After Eating

A heart palpitation is noticeable when it feels like your heart skipped a beat or had an extra beat. It may cause fluttering or pounding in the chest or neck. It can also be a sudden increase in your heart rate. Heart palpitations don't always happen when you’re doing something strenuous or stressful, and they may not be a symptom of anything serious. You may experience heart palpitations after eating for several reasons: Dietary supplements Some dietary supplements people take with meals may cause heart palpitations, including: bitter orange, which some people take for heartburn, weight loss, and skin issues ephedra, which some people take for colds, headaches, and increasing their energy levels ginseng, which some people take for increasing mental and physical energy hawthorn, which some people take for heart conditions, including angina valerian, which some people take for sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression Meal experience Heart palpitations after eating may be related to the meal experience rather than the food. Palpitations can occur due to the act of swallowing. You may sometimes feel palpitations when standing up after being seated for a meal. Emotions can also trigger palpitations, especially if your mealtimes cause anxiety or stress. Diet Your diet can also cause palpitations. The following are some diet-related triggers and risk factors: If you’ve been diagnosed with hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, you may be at higher risk for having heart palpitations due to your diet. High-carbohydrate foods and processed sugars can cause palpitations if you have issues with low blood sugar. Alcohol can also play a role. Researchers in a 2014 study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found a link between alcohol consumption and atrial fibrillati Continue reading >>

Heart Palpitations After Eating

Heart Palpitations After Eating

Some people experience heart palpitations after eating. These palpitations will typically start soon after the meal and may last for minutes or hours depending on the severity of the palpitations and the underlying cause. In most cases, the heart palpitations themselves are not dangerous. However, if you are experiencing heart palpitations for the first time you should discuss these symptoms with your doctor. If you experience symptoms similar to a heart attack including pain in your arm, a feeling of pain or pressure in your chest, dizziness or trouble breathing, seek immediate medical treatment. Heart palpitations can be caused by eating too much Heart palpitations after eating can be caused by consuming large meals. Following the consumption of food, the body directs blood flow to the digestive tract in order to assist with digestion. The amount of blood flow to the abdomen increases based on the size of the meal consumed. This increased blood flow reaches its peak approximately 25 to 40 minutes after eating and can last for 1 to 2 hours following a meal. In order to compensate for this change in blood flow, the heart must work harder. This can lead to a faster heart rate (tachycardia) and heart palpitations. If you notice that your heart palpitations tend to happen after large meals, try eating smaller meals throughout the day. As a bonus, this may also help with other digestive complaints. Specific foods act as palpitation triggers Heart palpitations after meals may also be caused by specific food triggers. Some of these triggers include caffeine or alcohol, which are thankfully easy to track. However, it’s also possible that you have other food sensitivities that you’re not aware of. In this case, keeping a food diary for a few days or weeks can shed light on Continue reading >>

Diabetes Linked To Irregular Heartbeat

Diabetes Linked To Irregular Heartbeat

Diabetes is linked to a 40 percent greater risk of developing atrial fibrillation — the most common kind of chronically irregular heartbeat, researchers found in a new study.… The researchers also found that this risk for irregular heartbeat rises even higher the longer people have diabetes and the less controlled their blood sugar is. For three years, the researchers tracked more than 1,400 Group Health patients who had newly recognized atrial fibrillation. They compared these cases with more than 2,200 ‘controls.’ The controls were matched to the cases by age, sex, year, and whether they were treated for high blood pressure; but unlike the cases, they had no atrial fibrillation. Dublin’s study was the first to examine the relationship between atrial fibrillation and the duration of patients’ diabetes and their blood sugar levels. Unlike most prior studies, this one also adjusted for patients’ weight, which is important because both diabetes and atrial fibrillation are more common in heavier people. The researchers found that patients with diabetes were 40 percent more likely to be diagnosed with atrial fibrillation than were people without diabetes. The risk of atrial fibrillation rose by 3 percent for each additional year that patients had diabetes. For patients with high blood pressure (HBA1c more than 9 percent), the risk of atrial fibrillation was twice that for people without diabetes. But patients with well-controlled diabetes (HBA1c 7 percent or less) were about equally likely to have atrial fibrillation as people without diabetes. “When a patient with diabetes has symptoms like heart palpitations, clinicians should have a higher level of suspicion that the reason could be atrial fibrillation. This heart rhythm disturbance is important to diagno Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Print Overview Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low level of blood sugar (glucose), your body's main energy source. Hypoglycemia is commonly associated with the treatment of diabetes. However, a variety of conditions, many of them rare, can cause low blood sugar in people without diabetes. Like fever, hypoglycemia isn't a disease itself — it's an indicator of a health problem. Immediate treatment of hypoglycemia involves quick steps to get your blood sugar level back into a normal range — about 70 to 110 milligrams per deciliter, or mg/dL (3.9 to 6.1 millimoles per liter, or mmol/L) — either with high-sugar foods or medications. Long-term treatment requires identifying and treating the underlying cause of hypoglycemia. Symptoms Similar to the way a car needs gas to run, your body and brain need a constant supply of sugar (glucose) to function properly. If glucose levels become too low, as occurs with hypoglycemia, it can cause these signs and symptoms: Heart palpitations Fatigue Pale skin Shakiness Anxiety Sweating Hunger Irritability Tingling sensation around the mouth Crying out during sleep As hypoglycemia worsens, signs and symptoms may include: Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks Visual disturbances, such as blurred vision Seizures Loss of consciousness People with severe hypoglycemia may appear as if they're intoxicated. They may slur their words and move clumsily. Many conditions other than hypoglycemia may cause these signs and symptoms. A blood sample to test your blood sugar level at the time of these signs and symptoms is how to know for sure that hypoglycemia is the cause. When to see a doctor Seek a doctor's help immediately if: You have what may be symptoms of hypoglycemia an Continue reading >>

Palpitations

Palpitations

Palpations are sensations by a person that they are having hard, rapid, or irregular heartbeats or a combination of these sensations. The following is a brief description of the heart's function that should help readers to better understand palpitations. The heart is a two-stage electrical pump whose function is to circulate blood to the organs and tissues of the body. The heart's electrical system allows the heart muscle to beat in a coordinated fashion to maximize the pumping strength of the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart, and make certain that there is an adequate amount of blood to be pumped. The upper chambers of the heart, called the atria (single=atrium) collect blood from the body and lungs and pump it into the ventricles. There needs to be a short delay to allow the ventricles to fill and then pump the blood back to the body and lungs to complete the cycle. The heart's electrical system allows this to happen, so that each chamber of the heart beats (contracts or squeezes) when it's supposed to. The sinoatrial node (SA node) is a collection of special cells embedded in the heart muscle of the right atrium. They act as the pacemaker for the heart by generating an electrical impulse 60 to 80 times per minute. This signal is transmitted to all the atrial muscle cells so that they can fire at the same time and pump blood from the atrium to the ventricle, the first half of a heartbeat. At the same time, an electrical impulse is sent to the atrioventricular node (AV node), located in the junction between the atrium and ventricle. The AV node acts as an electrical junction box and delays the electrical signal for a fraction of a second so that the ventricle can fill with blood from the atrium. It then sends the signal to all the muscle cells of the ventric Continue reading >>

Heart Palpitations

Heart Palpitations

Palpitations make you feel like your heart is beating too hard or too fast, skipping a beat, or fluttering. You may notice heart palpitations in your chest, throat, or neck. They can be bothersome or frightening. They usually aren't serious or harmful, though, and often go away on their own. Most of the time, they're caused by stress and anxiety, or because you’ve had too much caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol. They can also happen when you’re pregnant. In rare cases, palpitations can be a sign of a more serious heart condition. So, if you have heart palpitations, see your doctor. Get immediate medical attention if they come with: After your doctor takes your medical history and looks you over, he may order tests to find the cause. If he finds one, the right treatment can reduce or get rid of the palpitations. If there’s no underlying cause, lifestyle changes can help, including stress management. There can be many. Usually, palpitations are either related to your heart or the cause is unknown. Non-heart-related causes include: Strong emotions like anxiety, fear, or stress. They often happen during panic attacks. Hormonal changes during menstruation, pregnancy, or just before menopause. Sometimes, palpitations during pregnancy are signs of anemia. Medications, including diet pills, decongestants, asthma inhalers, and some drugs used to prevent arrhythmias (a serious heart rhythm problem) or treat an underactive thyroid Some herbal and nutritional supplements Abnormal electrolyte levels Some people have palpitations after heavy meals rich in carbohydrates, sugar, or fat. Sometimes, eating foods with a lot of monosodium glutamate (MSG), nitrates, or sodium can bring them on, too. If you have heart palpitations after eating certain foods, it could be due to food sensiti Continue reading >>

Heart Palpitations And Ectopic Beats

Heart Palpitations And Ectopic Beats

Heart palpitations are heartbeats that suddenly become more noticeable. Your heart may feel like it's pounding, fluttering or beating irregularly, often for just a few seconds or minutes. You may also feel these sensations in your throat or neck. Palpitations may seem alarming, but in most cases they're harmless and aren't a sign of a serious problem. Sometimes you may feel an extra or missed beat. These are known as ectopic beats and are also usually nothing to worry about. Causes of heart palpitations Causes of heart palpitations include: lifestyle triggers emotions and psychological triggers medication hormone changes heart rhythm problems heart conditions other medical conditions Click on these links for more information about these causes. Lifestyle triggers Common triggers of heart palpitations include: strenuous exercise not getting enough sleep drinks containing caffeine, such as coffee, tea and energy drinks rich or spicy foods In these cases, the palpitations should go away on their own. Avoiding these triggers may help stop them coming back. Emotional or psychological triggers Heart palpitations are also often caused by emotions or psychological issues, such as: excitement or nervousness panic attacks – an overwhelming sense of anxiety or fear, accompanied by feeling sick, sweating, trembling and palpitations Breathing exercises and panic attack tips may help if you're feeling stressed, anxious or panicky. Palpitations can occasionally be triggered by some types of: Speak to your GP if you think medication may be causing your palpitations. But don't stop taking a prescribed treatment without first getting medical advice. Heart palpitations in women can sometimes be the result of hormonal changes that occur during: pregnancy the menopause – when a woman st Continue reading >>

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