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Can Heat Stroke Cause Diabetes?

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes and Hot Weather - Staying Safe in the Heat There are hypo and hyper risks in hot weather Whether you are going on holiday or simply spending some time outdoors in the heat, high temperatures and the close humidity currently sweeping the UK do have an influence for people with long term conditions such as diabetes. This may partly be explained by increased activity in hot weather, but there is no doubt that the heat does affect some people with diabetes in other ways. What problems can hot weather cause for people with diabetes? Dehydration can be an issue in hot weather, and higher blood glucose levels can further increase this risk. People with diabetes may need to increase their intake of fluids in hot weather, drinking water regularly through the day. One of the major concerns regarding diabetes and hot weather is the risk of blood sugar levels rising or falling and causing hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia . What are the hypo risks from hot weather? Hot weather can increase the risk of hypoglycemia for those on blood glucose lowering medication. The Joslin Diabetes Centre notes that the bodys metabolism is higher in hot and humid weather which can lead to an increased chance of hypoglycemia. Hypos may be slightly harder to spot in hot weather. Dont be tempted to disregard hypo symptoms , such as sweating and tiredness, as a result of hot weather as it could be a sign of hypoglycemia. Take extra care when driving and test your blood sugar before and after each journey and stop regularly to check your blood sugar if taking longer journeys. To prevent hypos, be prepared to test your blood glucose more often, particularly if taking part in physical activity in hot weather. Keep a source of fasting carbohydrate, such as glucose tablets, to hand. To help treat hypos Continue reading >>

What Is Heat Stroke? Sign, Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention

What Is Heat Stroke? Sign, Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention

Heat stroke is a form of hyperthermia or heat-related illness , an abnormally elevated body temperature with accompanying physical symptoms including changes in the nervous system function. Unlike heat cramps and heat exhaustion , two other forms of hyperthermia that are less severe, heat stroke is a true medical emergency that is often fatal if not properly and promptly treated. Heat stroke is also sometimes referred to as heatstroke or sun stroke. Severe hyperthermia is defined as a body temperature of 104 F (40 C) or higher. The body normally generates heat as a result of metabolism , and is usually able to dissipate the heat by radiation of heat through the skin or by evaporation of sweat. However, in extreme heat, high humidity, or vigorous physical exertion under the sun, the body may not be able to sufficiently dissipate the heat and the body temperature rises, sometimes up to 106 F (41.1 C) or higher. Another cause of heat stroke is dehydration . A dehydrated person may not be able to sweat fast enough to dissipate heat, which causes the body temperature to rise. Heat stroke is not the same as a stroke. "Stroke" is the general term used to describe decreased oxygen flow to an area of the brain. Those most susceptible (at risk) individuals to heat stroke include: The elderly (often with associated heart diseases, lung diseases, kidney diseases, or who are taking medications that make them vulnerable to dehydration and heat strokes) Individuals who work outside and physically exert themselves under the sun Heat stroke is sometimes classified as exertional heat stroke (EHS, which is due to overexertion in hot weather) or non-exertional heat stroke (NEHS, which occurs in climactic extremes and affects the elderly, infants, and chronically ill. While the elderly are Continue reading >>

Heat And Diabetes

Heat And Diabetes

Living with diabetes blog Diabetes research is turning up new information on diabetes and diabetes management all the time. In 2009, I wrote a blog about the effects of heat on blood glucose control if you have diabetes. I mentioned, then, that heat doesn't have a direct effect on your blood glucose, but that heat can lead to changes in your daily routine which, in turn, can affect your blood glucose. Later research, published in September 2010 by researchers at Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz., suggests, additionally, that some Arizonans with diabetes have considerable gaps in their "heat awareness." This lack of awareness led to actions such as waiting until temperatures were quite high (above 101 F, or 38.3 C) before taking precautions against the heat and leaving medications and supplies at home rather than risk exposing them to the heat — meaning not having the supplies to manage diabetes while away from home. Sweating is an important means of cooling the body in hot weather, and the ability to sweat can be affected in some people with diabetes. Other studies have shown an increase in emergency room visits, in those who have diabetes, when temperatures are high. Diabetes equipment and medications can also be affected by heat. Tips for managing diabetes in warm temperatures remain the same: Avoid sunburn, it can stress your body and can raise your blood glucose. Wear a good sunscreen, sunglasses and hat when out in the sun. Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Carry a bottle of water with you on walks, etc. Exercise and do more strenuous activities in the early or later hours of the day when the temperatures are cooler and the sun is not at its peak. Check blood sugar levels frequently, since they may fluctuate. Remember, extreme temperature changes can have Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes , you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 d Continue reading >>

How Heat And Humidity May Affect Blood Sugar

How Heat And Humidity May Affect Blood Sugar

Hot weather does not directly alter blood glucose levels. However, sweltering temperatures affect our metabolism and the release of hormones. Heat and humidity influence how much and how fast we move, how much we perspire, blood circulation, the foods we want to eat, and the activities we choose to enjoy. Any of these factors, or a combination, might contribute to the experience of dehydration and blood sugar fluctuations. Six Steamy-Weather Influences We know when it is sizzling outside that we will sweat, and as the air wicks moisture from our skin the body cools. This cooling system works wonderfully as long as our body remains hydrated. If our body is low on fluids, the kidneys receive less blood flow and work less effectively. This might cause blood glucose concentrations to rise. If someone’s blood sugar is already running high in the heat, not only will they lose water through sweat but they might urinate more frequently too, depleting their body’s fluids even more. When the weather is tropical - hot and humid - the sweat on our skin cannot readily evaporate into the already soggy air. Our innate cooling system is less effective and the risk of heat exhaustion increases. Having poorly controlled or difficult-to-control blood sugar can inhibit some people’s ability to sweat. Without this effective natural cooling process, they are at higher risk for overheating—even when the humidity is not too high. While many diabetics notice higher blood sugar in hot weather, some individuals need less insulin when the weather turns significantly warmer. Although science has not figured out why this occurs, it may be owed to the dilation or widening of small blood vessels in hot temps. As these tiny blood vessels dilate, the body’s delivery system becomes more efficie Continue reading >>

Do You Have Diabetes? Here Are Some Tips To Keep You Healthy This Summer

Do You Have Diabetes? Here Are Some Tips To Keep You Healthy This Summer

Do you have diabetes? Here are some tips to keep you healthy this summer Diabetes can impair bodys ability to adjust to rising temperatures. Published: 06th April 2018 03:26 PM| Last Updated: 06th April 2018 03:26 PM |A+AA- Image used for representational purpose only. NEW DELHI: Chronic conditions such as diabetes can become tougher to manage in summers. Extreme heat causes blood glucose levels to fluctuate drastically, apart from leading to dehydration and exhaustion. Unless one takes adequate precautions, this can lead to heatstroke, a life-threatening condition requiring medical assistance. A major concern in this weather for those living diabetes is the risk of blood glucose levels rising or falling, leading to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Understanding this and the signs of heat exhaustion and taking timely measures can prevent complications. Speaking about this, Dr Sanjay Kalra Consultant Endocrinologist, Bharti Hospital Karnal, said, Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes impair the bodys ability to adjust to the rise in temperature in summer. Nerve damage, an associated complication of diabetes, can affect nearly every organ in the body, including sweat glands making it difficult for the body to cool down as the mercury rises. Diabetes can cause the body to lose water quickly. In the absence of sufficient hydration, this can raise blood glucose levels, causing frequent urination all of which can be detrimental. In higher temperatures, bodys insulin requirements can also vary making it even more necessary to test blood glucose more often and adjust the insulin dose accordingly. Speaking on these lines, Dr M Udaya Kumar Maiya, Medical Director, Portea Medical said, "Hot weather and the resultant increase in temperature can adversely impact people living with diabetes Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

How to keep your cool during the hottest time of year. Did you know that people who have diabetes—both type 1 and type 2—feel the heat more than people who don’t have diabetes? Some reasons why: Certain diabetes complications, such as damage to blood vessels and nerves, can affect your sweat glands so your body can’t cool as effectively. That can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. People with diabetes get dehydrated (lose too much water from their bodies) more quickly. Not drinking enough liquids can raise blood sugar, and high blood sugar can make you urinate more, causing dehydration. Some commonly used medicines like diuretics (“water pills” to treat high blood pressure) can dehydrate you, too. High temperatures can change how your body uses insulin. You may need to test your blood sugar more often and adjust your insulin dose and what you eat and drink. Drink plenty of water. Test your blood sugar often. Keep medicines, supplies, and equipment out of the heat. Stay inside in air-conditioning when it’s hottest. Wear loose, light clothing. Make a plan in case you lose power. Have a go-bag ready for emergencies. It’s the Heat and the Humidity Even when it doesn’t seem very hot outside, the combination of heat and humidity (moisture in the air) can be dangerous. When sweat evaporates (dries) on your skin, it removes heat and cools you. It’s harder to stay cool in high humidity because sweat can’t evaporate as well. Whether you’re working out or just hanging out, it’s a good idea to check the heat index—a measurement that combines temperature and humidity. Take steps to stay cool (see sidebar) when it reaches 80°F in the shade with 40% humidity or above. Important to know: The heat index can be up to 15°F Continue reading >>

Exploring Diabetes Type 2

Exploring Diabetes Type 2

Welcome! This is written primarily for people with Type 2 Diabetes. Some information covers all types of diabetes. Always keep a positive attitude is my motto.I am a person with diabetes type 2 and write about my experiences and research. Please discuss medical problems with your doctor. Please do not click on the advertisers that have attached to certain words in this section. They are not authorized and are robbing me by doing so. This is a large topic, so for simplicity I am dividing it into 6 parts: Basics, Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention. I live in the north central part of the US, and generally have about four or five months that I need to be concerned about heatstroke. Others have more or less time to be concerned depending on their location. I had heatstroke as a teenager, but have been able to adapt and have not had a reoccurrence. Yes, I am probably more conscious of what is happening now with that experience. Summer is the time of year to enjoy being outdoors. When summer arrives here, so do generally high temperatures and high humidity. People with chronic conditions have to be even more careful in the heat than usual, especially with diabetes. Hot summer weather can cause dehydration very quickly. It is important for everyone to increase their intake of liquids, not just people with diabetes. However, those of us with diabetes, have to know that dehydration can also occur when blood glucose levels are high, regardless of temperature, so when you are outside, it becomes doubly important to increase your intake of fluids. 1. Drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially water and even if you are not thirsty. Do not drink sugar-laden juices and sports drinks though -- they can just compound the problem. Beverages containing caff Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Tips For Handling The Summer Heat

Diabetes-friendly Tips For Handling The Summer Heat

The heat being experienced in many parts of the nation these days is tough enough for the average person, but for the estimated 21 million Americans with diabetes, special precautions may be required. "People with chronic diseases like diabetes as well as people taking certain medications, including heart disease medications and diuretics, which are often used to treat complications of diabetes, are at increased risk of experiencing difficulties in the heat, even though they may not be aware of it," says Catherine Carver, M.S., A.N.P., C.D.E, Director of Educational Services at Joslin Clinic. Carver and her colleagues at Joslin Clinic offer the following tips for people with diabetes during these steamy summer days: Keep hydrated. Dehydration, or the loss of body fluids, can happen on these very hot summer days whether you have diabetes or not. If you have diabetes, dehydration also can occur when blood glucose is not under control. When blood glucose is elevated, this can lead to an increase in the body's excretion of urine. To prevent dehydration drink plenty of caffeine-free fluids such as water, seltzer or sugar-free iced tea and lemonade. Limit your intake of alcohol. Watch for signs of heat exhaustion, especially if you are working or exercising outdoors. People with diabetes and other chronic diseases like heart disease are more susceptible to overheating. Symptoms include: feeling dizzy or fainting; sweating excessively; muscle cramps; skin that is cold or clammy; headaches; rapid heartbeat and/or nausea. If you experience any of these symptoms, move to a cooler environment, drink fluids like water, juice or sports drinks (based on your healthcare provider's instructions) and seek medical attention. Exercise in a cool place such as an air-conditioned gym, or ear Continue reading >>

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

The results weren't all bad. "Most patients incorporated appropriate personal protective measures such as staying indoors, drinking additional fluids on schedule, applying sunscreen, and wearing protective clothing," says Adrienne A. Nassar, MD, a third year resident at Mayo Clinic Arizona, who presented the findings at ENDO 2010 in San Diego, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. But the respondents fell short in other ways. For instance, one in five waited until temperatures were over 100 degrees before taking precautions, Nassar said at a news conference And 23% began drinking fluids when they got thirsty -- typically too late to prevent dehydration effectively. Many left their medications and monitoring equipment at home during a heat wave. Nassar and her colleagues analyzed responses of 152 people with diabetes living in Phoenix, where the average July temperature is 107 F. On average, the patients were 64 years old, 85% had type 2 diabetes, and 77% were on insulin injections or pumps. Their blood glucose test results on the hemoglobin A1c tests were on average 7.9%, although the goal for those with diabetes is 7%. While many respondents protected their medication in the heat by carrying it in a cooler, 37% left medication or supplies at home. "This is quite concerning,'' Nassar says, "because they would not have the means to check their blood sugar" if they became faint, for instance. While most respondents, 72%, knew about the effect of heat on insulin, just 40% said they had gotten information from their health care providers about the ill effects of high temperature on oral medications, 41% on glucose monitors, and 38% on glucose monitoring strips. The point at which respondents said they would take protective measures varies. Nassar can't pinpoint an ex Continue reading >>

Body Temperature Regulation In Diabetes

Body Temperature Regulation In Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus, commonly known as diabetes, refers to a group of metabolic disorders which are associated with an impaired ability to regulate glycemia. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most prevalent forms of the disease representing ~10 and ~90% of cases, respectively.1 Type 1 diabetes was formerly known as juvenile diabetes due to its common presentation in children and adolescents, and is characterized by the endocrine pancreas ceasing to produce insulin following the immune-mediated destruction of β-islet cells.2 Therefore, management of type 1 diabetes always requires exogenous delivery of insulin. Although the causes of type 1 diabetes remain to be elucidated, it is probably caused by a combination of genetic predisposition (with >40 loci known to affect susceptibility)3 and various environmental factors including stress and viruses.4 On the other hand, type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in adults and typically involves a combination of insulin resistance and relative (rather than absolute) deficiency of insulin.5 While the causes of type 2 diabetes are also incompletely understood, a plethora of studies have found associations with excessive abdominal adiposity,6 sedentary lifestyle, and poor dietary habits7 along with genetic factors. In contrast to type 1, type 2 diabetes may be treated in several ways including non-insulin pharmaceuticals, lifestyle modifications as well as exogenous insulin administration. Diabetes is becoming a worldwide public health issue, with the global prevalence in 2014 estimated at 9% among adults.8 By 2035, the International Diabetes Federation has projected a prevalence of 592 million cases with an additional ~175 million going undiagnosed.9 In North America alone, ~7% (2.5 million) of Canadian adults Continue reading >>

Summer Heat And Type 2 Diabetes

Summer Heat And Type 2 Diabetes

When the hottest days of summer hit, people with type 2 diabetes need to pay close attention to their condition. Here's how to savor the season without health worries. Medically Reviewed by Lindsey Marcellin, MD, MPH Summer conjures up images of backyard barbecues, pools and beaches, street festivals, fireworks, stargazing, and more. But summer heat can add to the problems faced by people living with type 2 diabetes . In fact, studies have shown that during a heat wave, emergency room use by people with diabetes increases. And while most people with diabetes are aware that extreme heat poses a danger, they may not always know when to take precautions . If you have diabetes, the high heat and humidity of summer can be difficult for your body to manage. The Centers for Disease Control recommends caution when the heat index which combines temperature and humidity readings reaches 80 degrees Fahrenheit with 40 percent humidity. Elderly people are at particular risk, but people of all ages with diabetes should be aware of summertime dangers. These include dehydration, heat exhaustion, and foot problems. Everyone, regardless of their health status, should make sure they drink enough fluids during the summer. People with type 2 diabetes, however, face an additional challenge because when their blood sugar levels are too high, they may be passing more urine than usual which means they are losing fluids more quickly. Add sweating into the mix and you have a recipe for speedy fluid loss. Certain medications, such as metformin (Glucophage), also increase the risk of dehydration. If you are out and about on a hot summer day, make sure you have enough of these beverages on hand to stay hydrated: Also, avoid alcohol and caffeine. Alcohol and caffeinated drinks are usually okay in mo Continue reading >>

The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive To Heat

The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive To Heat

Health |The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive to Heat Summer can be uncomfortable for anyone. But for people with diabetes, the heat and humidity can be particularly hazardous. One of the complications of diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2, is an impaired ability to adjust to rises in temperature, which can cause dangerous increases in body temperature during the summer. The underlying problem, nerve damage , occurs in 60 to 70 percent of Americans with diabetes; it can affect nearly every organ in the body, including sweat glands. When nerve damage keeps the sweat glands from working properly, the body fails to cool down as the mercury rises. In one small study, scientists compared diabetic patients and a group of healthy control subjects as they were exposed to increasing temperatures. The subjects were hooked up to devices that measured skin temperature, core temperature and sweat rates. As temperatures rose, the control subjects perspiration rates increased proportionately; their core temperatures stayed constant. For subjects with diabetes, sweat seemed to plateau irrespective of an alarming rise in core temperature , the scientists wrote. The diabetic subjects generalized inability to sweat across the body had a profound effect on core temperature. Research by the Mayo Clinic in Arizona shows that diabetic patients have higher rates of adverse events like hospitalizations, dehydration and death in the heat. Yet a survey by the clinic found that many were unaware of the greater risk and the need for special precautions. People with diabetes are particularly vulnerable to hot weather. A version of this article appears in print on June 29, 2010, on Page D5 of the New York edition with the headline: THE CLAIM: Diabetes makes you sensitive to heat. Order Reprints | To Continue reading >>

Heat Tolerance In Patients With Type I And Type Ii Diabetes

Heat Tolerance In Patients With Type I And Type Ii Diabetes

Jerrold Scott Petrofsky, PH D* Chris Besonis, BS, ATC† David Rivera, BS, ATC† Scott Lee, MD* *Department of Physical Therapy, Internal Medicine Loma Linda University Loma Linda, California †Department of Physical Therapy Azusa Pacific University Azusa, California KEY WORDS: thermoregulation, diabetes, heat stress, sweat Abstract Six control subjects and eight subjects with type 1 and type 2 diabetes were studied to understand the relationship between skin temperature, central body temperature, and sweat rate. The results of the experiments show that for all diabetic subjects (both type 1 and type 2) heat tolerance was poor. In fact, with a 30 minute exposure to an environmental temperature of 42˚C, even though subjects were at rest, central body temperature increased 1˚C more than that of controls. Further, skin temperature also increased. The reason for the increase in skin temperature and central body temperature appeared to be a failure of sweating. Sweating was lower at any skin temperature or at any skin location in diabetic compared with control subjects. Thus both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic subjects were more susceptible to heat stress. This could have significant implications for heat disorders such as heat stroke for individuals with diabetes. Introduction Diabetes is a major health care problem in the United States and around the world, affecting millions of people every year.1 Diabetes varies with race. For example, it has been estimated by the Centers for Disease Control2 that in the United States 7.8% of whites have diabetes whereas 10.8% people of African descent have diabetes. In the Mexican-American population, 10.8% of men and women were reported to have diabetes, whereas Pacific islanders have an incidence of over 15% for men and women. The ris Continue reading >>

Heat Stress & Diabetes Are A Dangerous Combination

Heat Stress & Diabetes Are A Dangerous Combination

Heat Stress & Diabetes Are a Dangerous Combination Even though autumn is just around the corner, many places in the country still have a couple of hot spells left. And those surprise heat waves can be bad news for people with diabetes. Its no secret that the elderly, the obese, and people with heart disease or respiratory conditions are vulnerable to heat-related illnesses. Its less well known, however, that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are more likely than non-diabetics to suffer heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and heat cramps. Diabetes can reduce the ability of blood vessels in the skin to expand (vasodilate), which in turn lowers the amount of blood thats circulated under the skins surface to dissipate heat. In one study, the skin blood flow responses of non-diabetics were compared to those of age-matched people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. During five minutes of heat exposure, vascular reactivity was decreased among those with diabetes. Another study showed that the internal temperature at which vasodilation took place during passive whole-body heat exposure was higher for people with type 2 diabetes than for others. Sweating is an important cooling mechanism because heat is dissipated as sweat evaporates from the body. Poor glucose control and the presence of neuropathy, however, may affect the sweating response. In one study of people with type 2, sweat rates were reduced, especially in the limbs, both at rest and during exercise in the heat. According to the study, The lower sweat rate was thought to be associated with diabetes-related peripheral neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction. Neuropathy also affects the sweat response in people with type 1 diabetes. In a study of patients with type 1, sweat responses to a heat stimulus (acetylcholine) were el Continue reading >>

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