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Can Heart Failure Cause Diabetes

What Types Of Heart Disease Are Linked To Type 2 Diabetes?

What Types Of Heart Disease Are Linked To Type 2 Diabetes?

High blood pressure. This happens when blood pushes against the walls of your blood vessels with a stronger force than normal. It makes your heart work harder than usual and damages your blood vessels. Most people with type 2 diabetes also have high blood pressure. Together, they put a lot of extra strain on your heart, boosting your chance of having serious issues like heart disease and stroke. Peripheral artery disease (PAD). With this condition, you have plaque buildup in the arteries of your legs.It typically causes pain in your calves. You'll feel it when you walk or climb stairs,and it usually goes away with rest. Your legs may also feel heavy, numb, or weak. PAD is also a warning sign. That's because if you have plaque in your legs, you might have it in your heart, too.In fact, PAD raises your odds of having a stroke or heart attack. Stroke. Diabetes also means you're more likely to have a stroke,where blood flow to part of your brain gets cut off. The symptoms may come on suddenly and include: A hard time talking, such as slurred speech Weakness in one arm, making it hard to lift and keep both arms in the air It's a life-threatening problem, and you need to get medical help right away. The sooner you get treatment, the more likely you are to prevent long-term problems. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on January 02, 2018 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "Diabetic Heart Disease," "Coronary Heart Disease," "Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)." Cleveland Clinic: "How Your Diabetes Can Mask Heart Disease -- Or a Heart Attack," "Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: 5 Tips for Cutting Your Risk," "Peripheral Artery Disease." Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Diabetes and Heart Disease." Mayo Clinic: "Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)," "Silent Heart Attacks: Continue reading >>

Heart Attack Boosts Diabetes Risk

Heart Attack Boosts Diabetes Risk

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. THURSDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- After a heart attack, the risk of developing diabetes and so-called pre-diabetes rises steeply, a new study finds. In fact, recent heart attack patients are up to four-and-a-half times more likely to develop diabetes compared with the general population and more than 15 times more likely to develop high blood sugar, according to the report in the Aug. 25 issue of The Lancet. "Having a heart attack means that the chances of getting diabetes later are increased," said Dr. Lionel Opie, director of the Hatter Cardiovascular Research Institute at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and author of an accompanying journal editorial. "We already know that diabetes predisposes one to heart attack, now we add that heart attacks predispose one to diabetes -- one nasty disease leads to another, and it's a two-way process." In the study, a team led by Dr. Roberto Marchioli, from the Laboratory of Clinical Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Chieti, Italy, collected data on almost 8,300 Italian patients who had suffered a recent heart attack and were not previously diabetic. More than three and a half years after the heart attack, a third of the patients had developed diabetes or had impaired insulin resistance (a precursor to diabetes), as measured by an increase in blood sugar. When they used a lower threshold for measuring blood sugar, 62 percent of the patients were defined as diabetic. "These findings further tie the knot between heart attacks and high blood glucose -- each is a risk for the other, the patient thus potentially being caught in a fatal vicious circle," Opie said. Risk markers for diabetes or high blood sugar in Continue reading >>

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering: Nearly two-thirds of people with diabetes have high blood pressure, and, according to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than people who don't have the condition. The good news: Learning more about the link between heart disease and diabetes can help you take steps to help protect your heart and manage your diabetes. How Diabetes and Heart Disease Are Related The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. Over time, the high glucose in the bloodstream can damage the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels, a condition known as atherosclerosis. This can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Other heart facts to consider: People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. Heart disease that leads to heart attack or stroke is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. A person who has diabetes has the same risk of heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. Protecting Your Heart When You Have Diabetes If you believe you are at a higher risk for heart disease, don’t despair. There are several small lifestyle changes you can make to not only help prevent heart disease, but also manage your diabetes more effectively. Be active. The American Heart Association recomme Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Having diabetes means that you are more likely to develop heart disease and have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain conditions, or risk factors, that increase the chances of having heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. If you have diabetes, you can protect your heart and health by managing your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, get help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.1 People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.2 The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, other factors add to your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke. Smoking Smoking raises your risk of developing heart disease. If you have diabetes, it is important to stop smoking because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels. Smoking also increases your chances of developing other long-term problems such as lung disease. Smoking also can damage the blood vessels in your legs and increase the risk of lower leg infections, ulcers, a Continue reading >>

Clinical Research Study Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Failure

Clinical Research Study Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Failure

Abstract Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Funding: This work was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The authors received no direct compensation related to the development of the manuscript. Manuscript editorial support was provided by Marissa Buttaro, MPH, RPh, of Envision Scientific Solutions, which was contracted and funded by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Conflict of Interest: ML has received speaker fees from Amgen, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Novo Nordisk, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, and Servier; is an advisory board member for Amgen, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Merck Sharp & Dohme, and Roche; and has received research support from Boehringer Ingelheim. NM has received speaker fees from Amgen, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Lilly, Merck S Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Heart and vascular disease often go hand in hand with diabetes. People with diabetes are at a much greater risk for heart attacks, strokes, and high blood pressure. Another vascular problem due to diabetes includes poor circulation to the legs and feet. Unfortunately, many of these cardiovascular problems can start early in life and may go undetected for years. Serious cardiovascular disease can begin before the age of 30 in people with diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), damage to the coronary arteries is two to four times more likely in asymptomatic people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Because symptoms may be absent at first, the ADA recommends early diagnosis, treatment,, and management of cardiac risk factors. People with diabetes often have changes in their blood vessels that can lead to cardiovascular disease. In people with diabetes, the linings of the blood vessels may become thicker, making it more difficult for blood to flow through the vessels. When blood flow is impaired, heart problems or stroke can occur. Blood vessels can also suffer damage elsewhere in the body due to diabetes, leading to eye problems, kidney problems, and poor circulation to the legs and feet (peripheral arterial disease or PAD). Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a group of metabolic risk factors in one person. People with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk of coronary heart disease, other diseases related to plaque buildup in artery walls (for example, stroke and peripheral arterial disease), and type 2 diabetes, according to the American Heart Association. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome include: Excessive fat tissue in and around the abdomen or a high waist circumference Blood fat disorders that foster plaque buildup i Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or olderwith diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of theseven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes,may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has been strongly associated with insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Failure

Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Failure

Login or register to view PDF. View eJournal Order reprints Diabetes mellitus and heart failure are two multifaceted entities characterised by high morbidity and mortality. Early epidemiological and prospective studies have observed the frequent co-existence of both conditions. Importantly, diabetes mellitus can precipitate or worsen heart failure due to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, inflammatory status impairment, decay of intracellular calcium, changes in microRNAs expression, not to mention atherosclerosis progression and coronary artery disease. Heart failure also impairs glucose metabolism through less well-known mechanisms. Attention must especially be given in the treatment as there are frequently adverse interactions between the two diseases and novel agents against diabetic cardiomyopathy are under investigation. As several missing links still exist in the connection between heart failure and diabetes mellitus we will review, in this article, the most recent data underlying the interaction of them and provide an overview of the most important clinical perspectives. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of diseases characterised by metabolic disturbances with increasing prevalence worldwide.1 Individuals with DM present several detrimental micro- and macrovascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease.2,3 Accordingly, efforts for early diagnosis and appropriate management are of ultimate importance. Despite the emphasis by clinicians in the prompt control of DM several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, etc., have been linked to impaired glucose management.4 Recently, the awareness in the sc Continue reading >>

The Pathophysiology Of Cardiovascular Disease And Diabetes: Beyond Blood Pressure And Lipids

The Pathophysiology Of Cardiovascular Disease And Diabetes: Beyond Blood Pressure And Lipids

In Brief The pathophysiology of the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is complex and multifactorial. Understanding these profound mechanisms of disease can help clinicians identify and treat CVD in patients with diabetes, as well as help patients prevent these potentially devastating complications. This article reviews the biological basis of the link between diabetes and CVD, from defects in the vasculature to the cellular and molecular mechanisms specific to insulin-resistant states and hyperglycemia. It concludes with a discussion of heart failure in diabetes, a clinical entity that demonstrates many of the mechanisms discussed. Diabetes is a prime risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Vascular disorders include retinopathy and nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), stroke, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Diabetes also affects the heart muscle, causing both systolic and diastolic heart failure. The etiology of this excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is not completely clear. Evidence suggests that although hyperglycemia, the hallmark of diabetes, contributes to myocardial damage after ischemic events, it is clearly not the only factor, because both pre-diabetes and the presence of the metabolic syndrome, even in normoglycemic patients, increase the risk of most types of CVD.1–4 In 2002, a survey of people in the United States with diagnosed diabetes found that, surprisingly, 68% of patients did not consider themselves at risk for heart attack or stroke.5 In addition, only about half of patients surveyed reported that their health care providers discussed the high risk of CVD in diabetes and what steps they could take to reduce that risk.5 Fortunately, we are now making the link. Health care providers are now focuse Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

By By Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center A strong link between diabetes and heart disease is now well established. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center several years ago showed a two- to threefold increase in the incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared with those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack or stroke is by far the leading cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in the treatment of heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so has the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival has been less than half as much as in the general population. Why Is Heart Disease So Common in People With Diabetes? Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease; however, a variety of mechanisms—not solely blood glucose levels—most likely come into play. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to other well-established risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and more than 90% of patients with diabetes have one or more of these additional risk factors. Some of the increased susceptibility to blood vessel damage that people with diabe Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart disease is common in people with diabetes. Data from the National Heart Association from 2012 shows 65% of people with diabetes will die from some sort of heart disease or stroke. In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the condition is more common in those with type 2 diabetes. In fact, heart disease is the number one cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes. The Framingham Study was one of the first pieces of evidence to show that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to heart disease than those people who did not have diabetes. The Framingham Study looked at generations of people, including those with diabetes, to try to determine the health risk factors for developing heart disease. It showed that multiple health factors -- including diabetes -- could increase the possibility of developing heart disease. Aside from diabetes, other health problems associated with heart disease include high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of early heart disease. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is 2 to 4 times higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. For example, one medical study found that people with d Continue reading >>

The Incidence Of Congestive Heart Failure In Type 2 Diabetes

The Incidence Of Congestive Heart Failure In Type 2 Diabetes

An update Abstract OBJECTIVE—The aims of this study were to update previous estimates of the congestive heart failure (CHF) incidence rate in patients with type 2 diabetes, compare it with an age- and sex-matched nondiabetic group, and describe risk factors for developing CHF in diabetic patients over 6 years of follow-up. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We performed a retrospective cohort study of 8,231 patients with type 2 diabetes and 8,845 nondiabetic patients of similar age and sex who did not have CHF as of 1 January 1997, following them for up to 72 months to estimate the CHF incidence rate. In the diabetic cohort, we constructed a Cox regression model to identify risk factors for CHF development. RESULTS—Patients with diabetes were much more likely to develop CHF than patients without diabetes (incidence rate 30.9 vs. 12.4 cases per 1,000 person-years, rate ratio 2.5, 95% CI 2.3–2.7). The difference in CHF development rates between persons with and without diabetes was much greater in younger age-groups. In addition to age and ischemic heart disease, poorer glycemic control (hazard ratio 1.32 per percentage point of HbA1c) and greater BMI (1.12 per 2.5 units of BMI) were important predictors of CHF development. CONCLUSIONS—The CHF incidence rate in type 2 diabetes may be much greater than previously believed. Our multivariate results emphasize the importance of controlling modifiable risk factors for CHF, namely hyperglycemia, elevated blood pressure, and obesity. Younger patients may benefit most from risk factor modification. As the leading cause of hospitalization for individuals aged 65 years and older (1), congestive heart failure (CHF) is emerging as a major public health concern. The CHF problem is magnified in individuals with diabetes, in whom inc Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Aaron contacted TheDiabetesCouncil with some questions related to diabetes and heart disease. Aaron is 57 years old. He has had Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Aaron visited his doctor related to swelling in his ankles and feet, shortness of breath, and weight gain. After some tests, the doctor informed him that on top of his Type 2 diabetes, he now has congestive heart failure. He was now wondering why did he have heart disease now and was it because of his diabetes? In order to help Aaron and other people with diabetes understand the connection between diabetes and heart disease and how to prevent it, we decided to look into the specific link between the two diseases. What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease? According to the American Heart Association, there exist a relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: 68% percent of people with diabetes who are aged 65 and older die from heart disease and 16% die of a stroke. People with diabetes are more likely to die from a heart disease than those without diabetes. The National Institute of Health states the following for people with diabetes: They have additional causes of heart disease They are at higher risk of heart disease than those who do not have diabetes They may develop heart disease at a younger age Risk assessment must take into account the major risk factors (cigarette smoking, elevated blood pressure, abnormal serum lipids and lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia) and predisposing risk factors (excess body weight and abdominal obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of CVD). Identification of risk factors is a major first step for developing a plan for risk reduction in persons with diabetes. – Scott M. Grundy et al, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease In two words, the conn Continue reading >>

Congestive Heart Failure (chf)

Congestive Heart Failure (chf)

A type of heart disease in which the heart no longer pumps sufficient blood to meet the body’s needs. Diabetes is a risk factor for heart failure, but a number of measures, including tight blood glucose control, can greatly reduce this risk. The heart is essentially a muscular pump that circulates about 2,000 gallons of blood throughout the body every day. It has four chambers: two upper chambers called atria, which receive blood, and two lower chambers called ventricles, which pump blood out. The chambers are separated by four heart valves that open and close in such a way that blood flows only in the proper direction. Each heartbeat involves a series of expansions and contractions of the heart muscle, as the heart receives oxygen-depleted blood from the body, sends it to the lungs to release carbon dioxide and receive oxygen, and delivers the oxygen-rich blood to the heart and the rest of the body. A healthy heart adjusts its output of blood based on the body’s changing needs, pumping more blood when a person is active and less blood when he is at rest. In congestive heart failure, the heart does not actually stop beating, but one or both of the ventricles become weak and unable to pump vigorously. As blood flow slows down, blood and fluid build up, or congest, in parts of the body. If the left ventricle is not pumping properly, blood and fluid collect in the lungs or heart; if the right ventricle is weak, fluid builds up in the legs and feet. If CHF continues untreated, the heart muscle may thicken or enlarge to compensate for its diminished pumping capacity, a change that further weakens the heart muscle. Heart failure usually develops gradually over many years, most often as the result of underlying coronary artery disease, damage to the heart muscle from a pre Continue reading >>

Heart Failure

Heart Failure

Tweet Heart failure, which is not to be confused with a fatal heart attack, describes any condition that prevents the heart from pumping blood around the body effectively enough. Around 70,000 people are diagnosed with heart failure in the UK each year. Heart failure becomes more common as we age, affecting around 1 in 7 of people aged 85 or older. Data from the 2010-11 UK National Diabetes Audit showed that people with diabetes are up to 65% more likely to suffer heart failure than the rest of the population Types of heart failure The three most common types of heart failure are a result of the following: Left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) - weakening of the left ventricle, the part of the heart that pumps blood around the body Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) - this can cause the left ventricle to become stiff and impairs its ability to fill with blood Valve disease - if the valves of the heart suffer damage or their function deteriorates Symptoms of heart failure Some of the more common symptoms of heart failure include: Being short of breath Having swollen ankles or feet which may develop to include a swollen stomach and lower back Feeling unusually weak or fatigued Diagnosing heart failure The following tests may be run to diagnose heart failure and to assess the type of heart failure you may have: Causes Heart failure can be caused by a number of different problems and having more than one of these contributory factors will increase the risk of heart failure occurring. Some of the main contributory factors for heart failure include: Cardiomyopathy (deterioration of the heart muscle) Atrial fibrillation (irregular heart rhythm) Problems that affect the valves of the heart Treatments for heart failure Treatments for heart failure can Continue reading >>

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