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Can Gestational Diabetes Affect The Baby?

How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect The Baby?

How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect The Baby?

Gestational diabetes is a health condition that involves high levels of glucose in the blood while a woman in pregnant. While most women with gestational diabetes have normal pregnancies and give birth to healthy babies, there are a number of complications that are more likely to occur in mothers with uncontrolled gestational diabetes. Large Birth Weight It is common for infant to be larger than normal for their gestational age, also known as macrosomia. This increases the risk of problems at birth and the likelihood of induced labor or a cesarean birth. For example, large birth weight increases the risk of shoulder dystocia, which is a condition involving difficulty giving birth due to the large size of the infant’s torso that become lodged behind the pelvic bone. This can be dangerous as the head may be obstructed, blocking the breathing of the infant when the body is stuck. Premature Birth Mother’s with gestational diabetes are more likely to have a premature birth, before week 37 of the pregnancy, which carries a greater risk of complication for the baby, such as jaundice or respiratory distress syndrome. Respiratory distress syndrome is a health condition that involved difficulty of breathing for the infant, often leading to the reliance on breathing assistance mechanisms in the early stages of life. With time, as the lungs mature and gain strength, the ability of the infant to breathe independently is almost always obtained. Rebound Hypoglycemia Shortly following the birth, it is common for infants born to a mother with gestational diabetes to experience health problems as a result of higher production of insulin that normal. Low blood sugar levels, known as hypoglycemia, are often observed and may result in symptoms such as irritability and excessive fatigue. Continue reading >>

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

If you become pregnant again If you become pregnant again, you are at higher risk of having gestational diabetes again. For this reason, talk to your doctor when you are planning your next pregnancy. You should be screened for diabetes before becoming pregnant again to make sure that your blood glucose is at a safe level, and as soon as you become pregnant you will need to monitor your blood glucose levels. "The second time round I didn’t eat chocolate, and getting out and walking was easier because I had a child. Worrying about it added a lot of anxiety to my pregnancy but I didn’t have gestational diabetes that time round." Prisha, mum of two Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes You are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in later life. This risk is highest in the four-to-five years after your gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, which, if left untreated, can lead to sight loss, foot numbness and heart disease, as well as the risks associated with having a hypo. But there is a lot you can do to reduce these risks. Gestational diabetes is a warning sign to show what could develop in later life if you don’t take action. Have a chat with your GP about what you can do to reduce your risk. It is also worth knowing the warning signs (shown below). Visit your GP if you are worried at all. Signs of diabetes Feeling more thirsty than usual Needing to wee more often – especially at night Frequent thrush infections Weight loss Slow-healing wounds Feeling unusually tired Blurred vision There is lots you can do to reduce your risk, by making changes to your lifestyle. Even if you develop type 2 diabetes, you may find you can manage it through diet and exercise. So, whichever way you look at it, these changes can make all the differ Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition of abnormally raised blood sugar levels that may occur in the second part of the pregnancy and goes away once the baby is born. Some women with gestational diabetes may need no treatment, some need a strict diet and others may need insulin injections. As GDM is a condition that occurs during pregnancy, it is not the same as having pre-existing diabetes during your pregnancy. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, usually around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Typically, women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests Some women with gestational diabetes (about 30%) have larger than average babies. As a result, they are more likely to have intervention in labour such as a caesarean birth. But the baby will not be born with diabetes. Studies have suggested that women who develop gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Testing for gestational diabetes All women are screened for gestational diabetes at their 24 to 28 week routine check up. Women who are at higher risk may be tested more often. You are at higher risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: are overweight over the age of 25 years a family history of type 2 diabetes come from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or some Asian backgrounds have had gestational diabetes before have had a large baby before. The tests available for gestational diabetes are: Glucose challenge test There is no fasting required and you are given a 50g glucose drink (equivalent to 10 teaspoons of sugar) with a blood test taken one hour after. This is a screening test only and if the result is above a certain level, you will be advised to have a gl Continue reading >>

How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect My Baby?

How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect My Baby?

If you have gestational diabetes (GDM) during your pregnancy, it puts the fetus at risk for a variety of conditions, including excessive weight (macrosomia or large for gestational age), hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hyperbilirubinemia (high bilirubin, which can lead to brain damage if not controlled), the need for an operative delivery or primary Caesarean section and shoulder dystocia (when the fetus's shoulder is trapped in the pelvis at the time of delivery -- a very serious complication that can result in lifelong injury). The main concern with gestational diabetes is that the baby may develop a fetal macrosomia, a condition in which it grows more than nine pounds, four ounces before birth, regardless of gestational age. This occurs because the baby is getting large amounts of glucose from the mother, which triggers the baby's pancreas to produce more insulin. The extra glucose, then, is converted to fat. In some cases, the baby becomes too large to be delivered through the birth canal, requiring a cesarean delivery. Gestational diabetes also increases the risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, in the baby right after delivery. This medical problem typically occurs if the mother's blood sugar levels have been consistently high, leading to high blood levels of insulin in the baby. After birth, the baby continues to have a high insulin level but no longer has the high levels of glucose from the mother. So the newborn's blood sugar levels drop sharply and suddenly. Your baby's blood sugar levels will be checked in the newborn nursery, and if they're too low, the baby may receive oral or intravenous glucose. Babies whose mothers have gestational diabetes or whose mothers had insulin-dependent diabetes before they became pregnant are also at higher risk for respira Continue reading >>

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You & Your Baby

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You & Your Baby

When you're pregnant, hormone changes can make your blood sugar level rise. Gestational diabetes will raise the odds of pregnancy complications. After you're diagnosed, your doctor or midwife will want to watch your health and your baby's health closely for the rest of your pregnancy. Most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Getting good treatment makes all the difference. How Will It Affect My Baby? Your higher blood sugar affects your baby, too, since they gets nutrients from your blood. Your baby stores that extra sugar as fat, which can make them grow larger than normal. They're more likely to have certain complications: Injuries during delivery because of their size Low blood sugar and mineral levels when they're born Jaundice, a treatable condition that makes the skin yellowish Pre-term birth Later in life, your baby might have a greater chance of obesity and diabetes. So help your child live a healthy lifestyle -- it can lower their odds for these problems. How Will It Affect Me? You might have: A higher chance of needing a C-section Pre-term birth Your blood sugar will probably return to normal after you give birth. But you'll have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later or gestational diabetes again with another pregnancy. A healthy lifestyle can lower the odds of that happening. Just as you can help your child, you can lower your own chances of obesity and diabetes. Although you may need a C-section, many women with gestational diabetes have regular vaginal births. Talk to your doctor or midwife about your delivery options: Does my baby need to be delivered by C-section? How accurate are birth-weight estimates? Could my baby be smaller than you think? What are the risks to my baby and I if I don’t have a C-s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Your Baby's Health

Gestational Diabetes And Your Baby's Health

Insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas, is necessary to move glucose (or sugar) into your cells after your body breaks down food for energy. During pregnancy, your body becomes less sensitive to the effects of insulin, which can lead to what’s known as gestational diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, your blood sugar can become too high, creating a number of health risks for your baby. Gestational Diabetes and Your Baby's Health If your blood sugar remains consistently elevated during pregnancy, the excess sugar can pass through your womb to your unborn baby. This can increase your child’s future risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Other health risks associated with gestational diabetes include: Macrosomia. This term simply means "big baby" and applies to any baby whose birth weight is above 8 pounds, 13 ounces. A baby with macrosomia can experience difficulties during the childbirth process. The most common problem that big babies encounter is damage to the nerves and muscles in their shoulders during vaginal delivery. Your doctor will monitor the size of your baby by performing ultrasound exams throughout your pregnancy. If your doctor is concerned about the size of your baby, a Caesarean section may be recommended. Hypoglycemia. If your unborn baby is exposed to high blood sugar levels while in the womb, the baby will eventually make extra insulin on its own to deal with the excess sugar. This surge in insulin can cause the baby's glucose to drop sharply right after birth, a condition called "hypoglycemia." Low blood sugar is dangerous because your baby depends almost exclusively on glucose for energy at the time of birth. Signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia include seizures, sluggishness, and difficulty breathing. For this reason, doctors will check Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

I Have Gestational Diabetes. How Will It Affect My Baby?

I Have Gestational Diabetes. How Will It Affect My Baby?

Will gestational diabetes hurt my baby? Most women who develop diabetes during pregnancy go on to have a healthy baby. Dietary changes and exercise may be enough to keep blood sugar (glucose) levels under control, though sometimes you may also need to take medication. But untreated gestational diabetes can cause serious problems. If blood sugar levels remain elevated, too much glucose ends up in the baby's blood. When that happens, the baby's pancreas needs to produce more insulin to process the extra sugar. Too much blood sugar and insulin can make a baby put on extra weight, which is stored as fat. This can make the baby grow very large (macrosomia). Also, high blood sugar levels during pregnancy and labor increase the risk of a baby developing low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) after delivery. That's because the baby's body produces extra insulin in response to the mother's excess glucose. Insulin lowers the amount of sugar in the blood. The signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia in an infant include: jitteriness weak or high-pitched cry floppiness lethargy or sleepiness breathing problems skin that looks blue trouble feeding eye rolling seizures A baby may also be at higher risk for breathing problems at birth, especially if blood sugar levels aren't well controlled or the baby is delivered early. (If you have gestational diabetes, your baby's lungs tend to mature a bit later). The risk of newborn jaundice is higher too. If your blood sugar control is especially poor, the baby's heart function could be affected as well, which can contribute to breathing problems. Gestational diabetes sometimes thickens a baby's heart muscle (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), causing the baby to breathe rapidly and not be able to get enough oxygen from her blood. It's understandable to feel anxi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Infant Of Diabetic Mother

Infant Of Diabetic Mother

Women may have diabetes during pregnancy in 2 ways: Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (diabetes) that starts or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. If the diabetes is not well controlled during pregnancy, the baby is exposed to high blood sugar levels. This can affect the baby and mom during the pregnancy, at the time of birth, and after birth. Infants who are born to mothers with diabetes are often larger than other babies. Larger infants make vaginal birth harder. This can increase the risk for nerve injuries and other trauma during birth. Also, C-sections are more likely. The infant is more likely to have periods of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) shortly after birth, and during first few days of life. Mothers with poorly controlled diabetes are also more likely to have a miscarriage or stillborn child. If the mother had diabetes before her pregnancy, her infant has an increased risk of birth defects if the disease was not well controlled. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes – Effects On Moms And Babies

Gestational Diabetes – Effects On Moms And Babies

Growing a baby when you have gestational diabetes (GD) means it’s time to seriously get your health groove on. Though GD is serious—but manageable—for you, it puts your baby is at significant risk for developmental issues and puts both of you at risk of having lifetime health concerns. Mom’s GD Any woman can develop gestational diabetes because pregnancy (gestation) causes so many changes in her body, the biggest of which is a tremendous increase in hormones. Some of those inhibit the conversion of sugar into energy, leaving that sugar in the bloodstream—the cause of all diabetes. Though symptoms of GD can be mild—or even non-existent—it can cause Blurred vision Fatigue Excessive thirst and urination Nausea and vomiting not associated with normal pregnancy Weight loss Increased rate of infections, particularly in the urinary tract (bladder), vagina, and skin More importantly, having undiagnosed GD sets you up for having high blood pressure and preeclampsia that can be life threatening to you and baby. And it increases your chance of having either gestational diabetes with subsequent pregnancies, or living with chronic Type 2. Fortunately, many women with GD give birth to healthy babies. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. Baby’s GD Trying to grow in the sugar soup of gestational diabetes can negatively affect how baby forms her parts, and how those parts work during her life. Birth defects are six times more likely for babies of mothers with GD. Excessive birth weight – makes baby too large to pass through the birth canal, causes birthing injuries, or requires a C-section birth Pre-term/premature birth – can mean baby isn’t fully formed or her systems aren’t fully functioning. Respiratory dist Continue reading >>

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

A risk means there is a chance that something might happen. With every pregnancy there are some risks, but if you have gestational diabetes your risks of some things will be increased. Managing your blood sugar level brings these risks right down again though and most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. These things are very unlikely to happen to you, but understanding the risks may help you see why it is important that you follow your healthcare team’s advice. The risks linked to gestational diabetes are caused by blood glucose levels being too high. If you can keep your blood glucose as close as possible to the ideal level, your risks will be reduced. Risk of having a large baby (macrosomia) If your blood glucose level is high, it can cause high blood glucose levels in your baby. Your baby will produce more insulin in response, just like you do. This can make your baby grow larger than normal. This is called macrosomia. Babies weighing more than 4kg (8lb 8oz) at birth are called macrosomic. Macrosomia increases the risk of: Birth trauma - either the mother or baby can be affected when it is difficult for the baby to be born. Trauma may include physical symptoms, such as bone fractures or nerve damage for the baby, or tearing and severe bleeding for the mother as well as psychological distress. Shoulder dystocia - where the baby’s shoulder is stuck in your pelvis once the head has been born. This can squash the umbilical cord, so the team need to use additional interventions to deliver the baby quickly and safely. It means you may have labour induced early or to have a caesarean section so that your baby is born safely. Your baby's weight will be monitored carefully in pregnancy to see whether these interventions are needed. Continue reading >>

How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect A Developing Baby?

How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect A Developing Baby?

Q: How does gestational diabetes affect a developing baby? A: You can help minimize your baby's chances of developing complications by carefully managing your gestational diabetes. The condition can cause a newborn to grow very big in utero (over 9 pounds), which may result in a traumatic delivery in which your baby could be injured. Having a very large baby also dramatically increases your chances of needing a cesarean section. Other potential problems for the baby include hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar), jaundice, electrolyte abnormalities, seizures, and breathing problems due to immature lungs (called respiratory distress syndrome). Furthermore, a new study published by the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that children born to mothers who had gestational diabetes are twice as likely to meet the criteria for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) by age 6 as those whose mothers did not develop the condition. They may also be at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

KEY POINTS Most pregnant women get a test for gestational diabetes at 24 to 28 weeks of pregnancy. If untreated, gestational diabetes can cause problems for your baby, like premature birth and stillbirth. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after you have your baby; but if you have it, you’re more likely to develop diabetes later in life. Talk to your health care provider about what you can do to reduce your risk for gestational diabetes and help prevent diabetes in the future. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes (also called gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM) is a kind of diabetes that can happen during pregnancy. Seven out of every 100 pregnant women (7 percent) develop gestational diabetes. It’s a condition in which your body has too much sugar (called glucose) in the blood. When you eat, your body breaks down sugar and starches from food into glucose to use for energy. Your pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) makes a hormone called insulin that helps your body keep the right amount of glucose in your blood. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use insulin well, so you end up with too much sugar in your blood. This can cause serious health problems, like heart disease, kidney failure and blindness. It’s really important to get treatment for diabetes to help prevent problems like these. Can gestational diabetes cause problems during pregnancy? Most of the time gestational diabetes can be controlled and treated during pregnancy to protect both you and your baby. But if not treated, it can cause problems during pregnancy, including: Preeclampsia. This is when a pregnant woman has high blood pressure and signs that some of her organs, like her kidneys and liver, may not be working properly. Signs of pre Continue reading >>

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