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Can Fruit Lead To Diabetes?

Will Eating Fruits Cause Diabetes?

Will Eating Fruits Cause Diabetes?

No, eating fruits cannot cause diabetes. - Type 1 diabetes is a genetic disorder marked by severe deficiency or absence of insulin production from the pancreas. Eating fruits cannot lead to this form of diabetes. - Type 2 diabetes is marked by resistance of the body to insulin. No natural fruits can produce insulin resistance on consumption.Hence, diabetes type 2 also cannot be induced by eating any fruits. - However, there are some fruits which are rich in sugars and should be avoided by people who are already diabetic,as eating these fruits increases blood sugar levels and can result in weight gain. - Some of the fruits that should be avoided are banana, custard apple, chikoo, sweet melon, grapes which are known to have very high levels of sugars. - Along with these packed fruit juices, sugar or fruit syrups, jams and jellies must be avoided as they increase blood sugar levels. - Some fruits that are very useful in diabetes are jamun, guava, star fruit, pineapple, papaya, oranges, water melon and pomegranate. These can be consumed in small proportions of 100-200 grams each day. Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Trigger Gestational Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Trigger Gestational Diabetes?

Women who eat large amounts of fruit during pregnancy may have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. A new study found that women who ate lots of fruit during their second trimester were four times more likely to develop the disease. The raised risk was particularly associated with fruits high on the glycaemic index. However, those who ate more fruit also had a higher total intake of carbohydrates. This may be the real culprit (see our analysis below). The study, published in Nature, aimed to investigate the association between fruit consumption during the second trimester and the occurrence of gestational diabetes. It tracked the diets of 772 women for more than a year. Of the 772 participants, 169 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes during the study period. An increased likelihood of gestational diabetes was particularly associated with consumption of tropical and citrus fruits, along with fruits high on the glycaemic index, which include bananas, pineapple, apricots, kiwis, watermelon, dates and raisins. Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition during pregnancy but it raises the risk of type-2 diabetes in later life. Instant analysis This was a prospective cohort study evaluating the association of fruit consumption and the occurrence of gestational diabetes. This study design is insufficient on its own in establishing causality, but establishes correlation. Gestational diabetes is diabetes diagnosed in pregnancy usually between 24 to 28 weeks of gestation, when insulin resistance is at its highest, which was not evident before pregnancy and doesn’t persist longer than six weeks after childbirth. During the study period, 1,126 women were deemed eligible for inclusion, of which the data of 772 women was subsequently analysed. The patients were divided int Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Too Much Fruit?

Can You Eat Too Much Fruit?

In my video If Fructose is Bad, What About Fruit?, I explored how adding berries to our meals can actually blunt the detrimental effects of high glycemic foods, but how many berries? The purpose of one study out of Finland was to determine the minimum level of blueberry consumption at which a consumer may realistically expect to receive antioxidant benefits after eating blueberries with a sugary breakfast cereal. If we eat a bowl of corn flakes with no berries, within two hours, so many free radicals are created that it puts us into oxidative debt. The antioxidant power of our bloodstream drops below where we started from before breakfast, as the antioxidants in our bodies get used up dealing with such a crappy breakfast. As you can see in How Much Fruit is Too Much? video, a quarter cup of blueberries didn’t seem to help much, but a half cup of blueberries did. What about fruit for diabetics? Most guidelines recommend eating a diet with a high intake of fiber-rich food, including fruit, because they’re so healthy—antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, improving artery function, and reducing cancer risk. However, some health professionals have concerns about the sugar content of fruit and therefore recommend restricting the fruit intake. So let’s put it to the test! In a study from Denmark, diabetics were randomized into two groups: one told to eat at least two pieces of fruit a day, and the other told at most, two fruits a day. The reduce fruit group indeed reduce their fruit consumption, but it had no effect on the control of their diabetes or weight, and so, the researchers concluded, the intake of fruit should not be restricted in patients with type 2 diabetes. An emerging literature has shown that low-dose fructose may actually benefit blood sugar control. Having Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

7 Fruits To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

7 Fruits To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

Fruit is not forbidden but some choices are better than others If you have diabetes, chances are someone has said that you are not allowed to eat fruit. This is not true; people with diabetes can eat fruit as part of their healthy eating plan. But, because fruit is a carbohydrate, it will affect your blood sugar and you cannot eat unlimited amounts. Certain fruits may cause your blood sugars to spike at a quicker pace than others. The tricky part about eating with diabetes is that everyone responds to food differently. While one person may be able to eat apples without any issue, someone else may find that apples cause their blood sugars to spike. Testing your blood sugars before and after eating fruit can help you to determine which fruits are best for you. Other ways to keep blood sugars controlled while enjoying fruit is to think about the context in which you eat it. You'll have a better chance at keeping your blood sugars controlled if you avoid juice altogether , limit your fruit servings to no more than two-to-threeper day (oneserving = 15 g of carbohydrate) , pair your fruit with protein or include it into your meal as part of your carbohydrate choice, and avoid fruits that are very ripe. The riper a fruit is the higher its glycemic index , which means it will raise your blood sugar more than a food with a low glycemic index. In addition to juice, there are certain fruits that make my do-not-eat list. These fruits have been placed on this list either because they have a higher glycemic index or because most people overeat them, which results in higher blood sugar. Danita Delimont/Gallo Images/Getty Images. One small grape contains one gram of carbohydrate, which means that 15 grapes are considered one serving of fruit. Odds are that if you are eating grapes, yo Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Loading your diet with fruit seems like a no-brainer, right? Your body gets a boost from nutritious superstars like fiber , vitamins, and antioxidants, plus juicy berries might even satisfy your sweet tooth . But that doesnt mean maintaining a 24/7 fruit free-for-all is good for your health. Fruit is high in a sugar known as fructose. Even though the sugar is coming from this healthy source, you still have to use moderation, says Brigitte Zeitlin, MPH, RD, CDN, a dietitian at B-Nutritious . If youre panicking because youve been devouring fruit salad to your hearts content, dont worry. Heres what you need to know about how much fruit you should really be eating every day. Why Eating Too Much Fruit Might Impact Your Health Sugar comes in a few different forms: Glucose, fructose and sucrose. Glucose helps keep all your systems chugging along smoothly. Carbohydrates break down into glucose, your bodys main source of fuel, says Beth Warren , MS, RDN, CDN, registered dietitian and author of Living a Real Life with Real Food . Then you have fructose, the only type of sugar found in fruits. Its metabolized in the liver, as opposed to in the blood stream. Sucrose, more commonly known as table sugar, is simply a combination of both glucose and fructose. RELATED: The Bitter Truth About Sugar and Its Effects on Our Health High blood sugar, which is caused by too much glucose in your blood, can lead to diabetes. Refined carbohydrates, like white rice or white-flour baked goods, are common culprits leading to high blood sugar. In addition to their sugar content, they lack the fiber that prevents glucose spikes, wreaking havoc on your blood sugar levels. Too much sugar in the blood stream at once leads to fat storage and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, says Zeitli Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

Do Apples Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Apples Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels?

Apples are delicious, nutritious and convenient to eat. Studies have shown that they have several health benefits. Yet apples also contain carbs, which impact blood sugar levels. However, the carbs found in apples affect your body differently than the sugars found in junk foods. This article explains how apples affect blood sugar levels and how to incorporate them into your diet if you have diabetes. Apples are one of the most popular fruits in the world. They're also highly nutritious. In fact, apples are high in vitamin C, fiber and several antioxidants. One medium apple contains 95 calories, 25 grams of carbs and 14% of the daily value for vitamin C (1). Interestingly, a large part of an apple's nutrients is found in its colorful skin (2). Furthermore, apples contain large amounts of water and fiber, which make them surprisingly filling. You're likely to be satisfied after eating just one (3). Apples are a good source of fiber, vitamin C and antioxidants. They also help you feel full without consuming a lot of calories. If you have diabetes, keeping tabs on your carbohydrate intake is important. That's because of the three macronutrients — carbs, fat and protein — carbs affect your blood sugar levels the most. That being said, not all carbs are created equal. A medium apple contains 25 grams of carbs, but 4.4 of those are fiber (1). Fiber slows down the digestion and absorption of carbs, causing them to not spike your blood sugar levels nearly as quickly (4). Studies show that fiber is protective against type 2 diabetes, and that many types of fiber can improve blood sugar control (5, 6). Apples contain carbs, which can raise blood sugar levels. However, the fiber in apples helps stabilize blood sugar levels, in addition to providing other health benefits. Apples Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Cause Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Cause Diabetes?

Can eating too much fruit cause diabetes? According to a new study, eating plenty of fruit during pregnancy was strongly associated with developing gestational diabetes. 1 Women eating lots of fruit had almost an almost 400% percent increase in risk of developing diabetes! Scientific reports: Excessive fruit consumption during the second trimester is associated with increased likelihood of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective study As usual, this kind of observational study do not prove causation, but the massive effect in this case (a 400 percent increase in risk!) is hard to explain away. Fruit is full of sugar, so the connection shouldn’t be too surprising. And while fruit is considered very natural, the fruit you find in the supermarket today has been grown to be both bigger and sweeter than it used to be in nature. So if you have, or are at risk of developing diabetes, it’s likely smart to limit your consumption of sugary fruits. Check out our guide below for the worst and best kinds of fruit on a low-carb diet. Earlier What Fruits and Vegetables Looked like Before Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Prevent And Reverse Diabetes (5 Foods To Eat And 6 To Avoid)

How To Eat To Prevent And Reverse Diabetes (5 Foods To Eat And 6 To Avoid)

By Joel Fuhrman, MD, 2018 Food Revolution Summit speaker Discover the best diet for diabetics and how to eat to prevent diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can be reversed and even type 1 diabetics can improve their life and health. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., and doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke. Diabetes takes an enormous toll on the health of our population. Diabetes accelerates aging; damaging the kidneys, cardiovascular system, eyes and nerve tissue, and increases cancer risk. However, type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease our food choices can either prevent or promote insulin resistance and resultant diabetes. The devastating complications and premature deaths associated with diabetes can be prevented. The primary cause of the parallel increases in obesity and diabetes is the nutrient-depleted American diet. For diabetics and pre-diabetics especially, new research proves what moms having been telling their children through the ages, eat your veggies, theyre good for you. See how to eat to prevent diabetes and how to eat if you have diabetes. 5 Best Foods for Diabetics and for Preventing Diabetes Many conventional diabetes diets rely on meat or grains as the major calorie source. However, these strategies have serious drawbacks. High-nutrient, low glycemic load (GL) foods are the optimal foods for diabetics, and these foods also help to prevent diabetes in the first place. Nutrient-dense green vegetables leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables , and other green vegetables are the most important foods to focus on for diabetes prevention and reversal. Higher green vegetable consumption is associated with lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and among diabetics, higher green vegetable intake is associated with lower HbA1c levels. A rec Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

Dried fruit contains more sugar than it does in fresh or frozen form. For example, one-half of a cup of dried fruit is equivalent to 1 cup of fruit in any other form. People who do more than 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day may be able to eat more fruit than those who do not. If a person eats the RDA of fruit, their risk of diabetes should not increase. People who are overweight are more at risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who are not. One of the primary causes of weight gain is if a person eats more calories than they burn off. Sugary foods and drinks are usually high in calories. Eating the RDA for fruit should not increase a person's risk of diabetes. Fruit juice is particularly high in sugar but drinking no more than 1 cup of fruit juice per day can help keep sugar intake within healthful limits. Many processed or baked foods, such as biscuits or ketchup, contain added sugar. By limiting these foods, people can reduce their calorie and sugar intakes. People with prediabetes have higher blood glucose levels than the average but not high enough for a doctor to diagnose type 2 diabetes. Although prediabetes increases the risk of developing diabetes, it does not mean that a person will definitely develop the condition. It is possible for people with prediabetes to lower their blood glucose and their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Losing weight and doing daily exercise can help reduce this risk . Some medications can also decrease a person's risk of developing diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommend eating fruit, as part of a healthful diet. For people with diabetes, a crucial part of managing their condition is their diet, and they often need to plan their meals. They may need to monitor the amount of sugar in their diet, or avoid Continue reading >>

Daily Diet Of Fresh Fruit Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

Daily Diet Of Fresh Fruit Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

"Eating fresh fruit daily could cut risk of diabetes by 12%," the Mail Online reports. A study of half a million people in China found those who ate fruit daily were 12% less likely to get type 2 diabetes than those who never or rarely ate it. It was also found that people with diabetes at the start of the study who ate fruit regularly were slightly less likely to die, or to get complications of diabetes, such as eye problems (diabetic retinopathy), during the study than those who ate fruit rarely or never. Many people with diabetes in China avoid eating fruit, because they are told it raises blood sugar. However, the study suggests fresh fruit may actually be beneficial for people with and without diabetes. Fruits which release sugars more slowly into the blood, such as apples, pears and oranges, are the most popular in China, according to the researchers. So this may be the preferred option if you are worried about diabetes risk, or have been diagnosed with diabetes. The study doesn't show that fruit directly prevents diabetes or diabetes complications, as an inherent limitation of this type of study is that other factors could be involved. And it doesn't tell us how much fruit might be too much. Overall, the research suggests fresh fruit can be part of a healthy diet for everyone. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of Oxford, and Peking University, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Non-communicable Disease Prevention and Control Department, and Pengzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, all in China. It was funded by the Kadoorie Charitable Foundation. The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Medicine on an open-access basis, so Continue reading >>

Eating Fruit Significantly Cuts Diabetes Risk - But Drinking Juice Increases It, Says Study

Eating Fruit Significantly Cuts Diabetes Risk - But Drinking Juice Increases It, Says Study

Eating whole fruits such as blueberries can cut the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 26 percent ( PA ) Eating fruit significantly cuts diabetes risk - but drinking juice INCREASES it, says study People who ate three standard servings a week of whole fruits like blueberries had a 26 per cent lower chance of developing the disease Eating blueberries, grapes, apples and pears cuts the risk of type 2 diabetes but drinking fruit juice can increase it, a large study has found. Experts from the UK, Singapore and a team from Harvard School of Public Health in the US have examined whether certain fruits impact on type 2, which affects more than 3,000,000 people in Britain. The scientists found that blueberries, grapes, raisins, apples and pears were especially protective, while drinking fruit juice could increase the risk of developing the condition by as much as 8 percent. With an Independent Minds subscription for just 5.99 6.99 $9.99 a month Without the ads for just 5.99 6.99 $9.99 a month People who ate three standard servings of blueberries a week had a 26 percent lower chance of developing the condition, they found. Those who replaced fruit juices with three helpings of particular whole fruits a week, including apples and pears could expect a 7 percent drop in their risk of developing type 2. Eating different fruits affected an individual's chances of developing the condition in different ways, the research suggests. Those eating grapes and raisins had a 12 percent reduced risk. Prunes also had a protective effect, giving an 11 percent drop in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Other fruits such as bananas, plums, peaches and apricots had a negligible impact but drinking fruit juice increased the risk by 8 per cent, according to the study. For individual fruits, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

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