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Can Frequent Urination Be A Sign Of Diabetes?

Resolving Diabetes-related Bladder Problems

Resolving Diabetes-related Bladder Problems

Diabetes can cause a host of medical complications, some well-known and others less so. Bladder and voiding (bladder emptying) problems are quite common in people with diabetes, both in those who have had trouble maintaining good blood glucose control and in those who have been able to keep a tight rein on their levels. The bad news is that bladder problems, like so many complications of diabetes, are at first “silent” ones — they can go unsuspected for months or even years before suddenly manifesting themselves. The good news is that by looking out for certain warning signs, you can catch bladder problems early and treat them before permanent injury is done. Why bladder problems? The reason people with diabetes develop bladder problems is complex and involves the bladder muscles and the nerves that control them. The picture is further complicated by the fact that people with diabetes can develop all of the same bladder and voiding problems as people who don’t have diabetes. For instance, women with diabetes can develop the same overactive bladder problems (including feeling sudden urges to void and needing to void more frequently) that women without diabetes often have. Likewise, men with and without diabetes tend to develop enlarged prostates as they get older, causing both obstruction of the flow of urine and irritability of the bladder (a condition that has symptoms similar to overactive bladder, but different treatments). A stroke or a herniated disk compressing a spinal nerve, among other non-diabetes-related conditions, can also cause bladder problems. Sometimes a person with diabetes may have bladder and voiding problems with multiple causes, only one of which is diabetes. Seeing a physician who is familiar with the many possible causes of bladder dysfun Continue reading >>

Polyuria And Type 1 Diabetes

Polyuria And Type 1 Diabetes

What causes frequent urination with diabetes? Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than normal. Frequent urination is also a symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes that can lead to extreme dehydration and eventually affect your kidney function. Polyuria in diabetes occurs when you have excess levels of sugar in the blood. Normally, when your kidneys create urine, they reabsorb all of the sugar and direct it back to the bloodstream. With type 1 diabetes, excess glucose ends up in the urine, where it pulls more water and results in more urine. What should I do if I think I’m experiencing type 1 diabetes-related polyuria? If you find you are suddenly urinating more frequently—especially if it’s accompanied by other symptoms—it’s important to see your doctor. As we mentioned above the dehydration that results from polyuria, or excessive urination, can lead to kidney problems—or even diabetic ketoacidosis, which can be life-threatening. Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Frequent Urination | No 3 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Early Symptoms

Diabetes Frequent Urination | No 3 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Early Symptoms

Hidden Diabetes Frequent Urination Problems Diabetes frequent urination problems can sneak up slowly and often go undiagnosed. Many people have type 2 diabetes early symptoms like extreme thirst or diabetes frequent urination. Signs and symptoms include sores that won’t heal, frequent infections, and changes in vision. Some patients actually go to the doctor with symptoms resulting from the complications like tingling in the feet (neuropathy), dry itchy skin, excessive hunger and weight gain, or blurry vision, without knowing they have the disease. In fact, diabetes is called a silent epidemic because approximately one-third of those affected don’t even know they are at risk and it takes an average of 4 to 7 years before they learn the truth. Undiagnosed or poorly controlled – this disease can have dire consequences – making it vital to recognize diabetes frequent urination problems as one of ten type 2 diabetes early symptoms. You may notice changes like going to the bathroom more often. Some people chalk the changes up to growing older and don’t consider that the symptoms may be a side-effect of elevated blood sugar. Diabetes frequent urination problems are often most noticeable at night. Going to the toilet a lot (especially at night) can make you feel tired, but both the fatigue and frequent urination can be one of type 2 diabetes early symptoms. What is considered normal for urinary frequency? For most people, normal frequency is about 6 – 7 times in a 24 hour period but that can be as much as 10 times for some people. Going to the bathroom more often can be a result of too much glucose in the blood. When blood sugar levels routinely exceed 180 mg/dl, then the kidneys dump sugar in the urine, which in turn draws out excessive fluid into the urine. This Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination?

How Can Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination?

How can diabetes cause frequent urination? Frequent urination with an abnormally large amount of urine is often an early symptom of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This happens because the body tries to rid itself of unused glucose through the urine. International Painful Bladder Foundation: "The Urinary Tract and How It Works." MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination." American Diabetes Association: "Dropping Insulin to Drop Pounds." March of Dimes: "Changes During Pregnancy" National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia." National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Interstitial Cystitis/ Painful Bladder Syndrome." University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority: "After a Stroke, Managing Your Bladder." MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination." MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Urinalysis." WebMD Information and Resources: "Cystoscopy." National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures." The American Heritage Medical Dictionary, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007. National Center of Biotechnology Information: "Comparing Drugs for Overactive Bladder Syndrome." National Association for Continence: "Overactive Bladder Syndrome." Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Major Warning Sign Of Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Major Warning Sign Of Disease

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The condition can cause long-term complications - and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney damage. However it can alter the way the body works in the short-term. People with diabetes of find they are going to the toilet a lot, and often later at night. The term for urinating at night is called nocturia. Experts say needing to go to the toilet once a night is relatively normal, however, any more than this could indicate there are underlying health conditions. Urinating more often than usual can be triggered by excess glucose - or sugar -in the blood. This interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. More sugar will also appear in the urine and this will cause more volumes of urine to be produced. High blood sugar levels - a hallmark of type 2 diabetes - can also trigger urinary tract infections - which can increase the need to urinate during the night. Urinating at night could also be a sign of prostate diseases, or prostate cancer, or excessive fluid intake. Experts also said it could be a symptom of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological condition. Excessive thirst - which is also called polydipsia are classic diabetes symptoms. Tiredness, itching around the penis or vagina and slow wound healing are also symptoms of the disease. What happens if you ignore the signs? Diabetes UK said: “Type 2 diabetes can be easier to miss as it develops more sl Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent urination means having an urge to pass urine more often than usual. It can disrupt one's normal routine, interrupt the sleep cycle, and it can be a sign of an underlying medical condition. Many people live with frequent urination, known medically as frequency. When one urinates more than 3 liters a day of urine, this is known as polyuria. Often, there is often a simple cause that can be put right through treatment. Frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, where there is leakage of urine. Sometimes, frequent urination can indicate a more serious condition. Early identification of the problem can lead to a timely and effective treatment and prevent complications. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about frequent urination. More detail is in the main article. Urinary frequency, or just frequency, is different from urinary incontinence. Most people urinate 6 or 7 times in 24 hours. Urinating more often than this may be referred to as frequency, but everyone is different. It is normally only a problem if it affects a person's quality of life. Frequency can often be treated with exercises, but if there is an underlying condition, such as diabetes, this will need attention. What is frequent urination? Urination is the way the body gets rid of waste fluids. Urine contains water, uric acid, urea, and toxins and waste filtered from within the body. The kidneys play a key role in this process. Urine stays in the urinary bladder until it reaches a point of fullness and an urge to urinate. At this point, the urine is expelled from the body. Urinary frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, which refers to having little control over the bladder. Urinary frequency just means needing to visit the bathroom to urinate more often. It can occur a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

What is diabetes? What are the types of diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose), is too high (hyperglycemia). Glucose is what the body uses for energy, and the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that helps convert the glucose from the food you eat into energy. When the body either does not produce enough insulin, does not produce any at all, or your body becomes resistant to the insulin, the glucose does not reach your cells to be used for energy. This results in the health condition termed diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, because it usually is diagnosed during childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce insulin because the body’s immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas called beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is treated by using insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This occurs when blood sugar levels get too high over time, and the cells become insensitive or resistant to insulin (termed insulin resistance). There are multiple medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are unique to men? Signs and symptoms of diabetes unique to men include: What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in men and women? There are diabetes warning signs and symptoms that both women and men have in common, for example: Excessive thirst and hunger Irritability Slow-healing wounds Skin infections Breath odor that is fruity, sweet, or an acetone odor Diabetes Diet: Healthy Meal Plans for Diabetes-Friendly Eating How does diabetes affect men differently than wom Continue reading >>

Polyuria - Frequent Urination

Polyuria - Frequent Urination

Tweet Polyuria is a condition where the body urinates more than usual and passes excessive or abnormally large amounts of urine each time you urinate. Polyuria is defined as the frequent passage of large volumes of urine - more than 3 litres a day compared to the normal daily urine output in adults of about one to two litres. It is one of the main symptoms of diabetes (both type 1 and type 2 diabetes) and can lead to severe dehydration, which if left untreated can affect kidney function. Causes of polyuria Polyuria is usually the result of drinking excessive amounts of fluids (polydipsia), particularly water and fluids that contain caffeine or alcohol. It is also one of the major signs of diabetes mellitus. When the kidneys filter blood to make urine, they reabsorb all of the sugar, returning it to the bloodstream. In diabetes, the level of sugar in the blood is abnormally high. Not all of the sugar can be reabsorbed and some of this excess glucose from the blood ends up in the urine where it draws more water. This results in unusually large volumes of urine. Other causes of polyuria include: Diabetes inspidus - a condition unrelated to diabetes mellitus that affects the kidneys and the hormones that interact with them, resulting in large quantities of urine being produced. Kidney disease Liver failure Medications that include diuretics (substances that increase the excretion of water from the body/urine) Chronic diarrhoea Cushing’s syndrome Psychogenic polydipsia - excessive water drinking most often seen in anxious, middle-aged women and in patients with psychiatric illnesses Hypercalcemia - elevated levels of calcium in the blood Pregnancy Polyuria as a symptom of diabetes As well as being one of the symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes, polyuria can also occur in peop Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes symptoms may occur when blood sugar levels in the body become abnormally elevated. The most common symptoms of diabetes include: increased thirst increased hunger excessive fatigue increased urination, especially at night blurry vision Symptoms can vary from one person to the next. They also depend on which type of diabetes you have. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to begin abruptly and dramatically. Type 1 diabetes is most often seen in children, adolescents, and young adults. However, type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. In addition to the symptoms listed above, people with type 1 diabetes may notice a quick and sudden weight loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. Although it primarily develops in adults, it’s beginning to be seen more frequently in younger people. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being overweight, being sedentary, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes don’t experience any symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms are slow to develop. Oftentimes, your symptoms may seem harmless. The most common symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst and fatigue, are often vague. When experienced on their own, symptoms such as these may not be anything to worry about. If you’re experiencing one or more of these symptoms, you should speak with your doctor about being screened for diabetes. Frequent thirst You’ve had glass after glass of water, but you still feel like you need more. This is because your muscles and other tissues are dehydrated. When your blood sugar levels rise, your body tries to pull fluid from other tissues to dilute the sugar in your bloodstream. This process can cause your body to dehydrate, prompting you to drink more water. Frequent urination Drinking excessive amou Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

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