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Can Flonase Raise Your Blood Sugar?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Effect Of Intranasal Steroids On Glucose And Hemoglobin A1c Levels In Diabetic Patients.

Effect Of Intranasal Steroids On Glucose And Hemoglobin A1c Levels In Diabetic Patients.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Intranasal steroids are widely used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases of the nose and sinuses such as rhinosinusitis, allergic rhinitis, and nonallergic rhinitis. Along with the general otherwise healthy population, many diabetic patients use intranasal steroids as well. This study was designed to evaluate the adverse effects of long-term treatment with intranasal corticosteroid preparations in diabetic patients. METHODS: The study group included all diabetic patients treated with intranasal steroids for at least 3 months at primary care clinics in Clalit Health Services Central District in Israel in 2002-2007. The central database had been reviewed for demographic data, medical history, medications, and laboratory test results. RESULTS: A total of 1768 diabetic patients were treated with topical nasal steroid sprays during the study period. Data on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels both before and during steroid treatment was available for 245 patients, and data on fasting serum glucose levels at both time points was available for 163 patients. On statistical analysis, there was no change in either measure from baseline to 3 months after starting treatment (p = 0.104 and p = 0.101, respectively). Treatment with triamcinolone acetonide was associated with a significantly greater increase in fasting serum glucose levels than other preparations (p = 0.006). CONCLUSION: Intranasal corticosteroids seem to have no adverse effects on HbA1c and serum glucose levels in diabetic patients. Their long-term use appears to be safe, provided that the patients are carefully monitored, especially those receiving triamcinolone acetonide. Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

I recently had my regular six month blood work done for high cholesterol and my regular blood glucose was 101 mg/dl [5.6 mmol/L], but the A1c was 6.2. I also realized that I use Flonase a lot more this time of year. Since it has steroids in it, could that be the reason for the 6.2 A1c increase? And, if not, then does this increase suggest diabetes? Also, I have been taking my blood at home and two hours after meals at least three times a week. My blood sugars have been between 89 and 101 mg/dl [4.9 and 5.6 mmol/L]. Have you been diagnosed with diabetes or are you screening for its onset? The A1c at this level does not diagnose diabetes. A fasting glucose of 101 mg/dl [5.6 mmol/L] is impaired fasting glucose or pre-diabetes. The two-hour glucose levels you describe are good results. There is data to suggest that enough steroids can be absorbed from inhaled steroids to suppress the adrenal glands. However, to know for sure if steroid use in your situation caused a change in glucose levels, you would have to know a lot more than what you provided. For instance, what is average fasting glucose before and after time of interest? It is unlikely you can answer this other than to see what happens when you don't use the Flonase. Continue reading >>

Flonase And Higher Sugars?

Flonase And Higher Sugars?

Anyone have any thoughts on the possibility of inhaled steroids (like Flonase) affecting blood sugars? Since starting it a few weeks ago, my blood sugars seem to be spiking much higher after rather modest carb meals. Just wondered if there was a correlation. I might add, Ive been fighting an upper respiratory virus for about a month (and gave it to my wife as well) - not sure how viruses affect blood sugar. Inhaled steroids arent supposed to cause high BG like oral steroids, but they can. Do you have a choice of using a non-steroidal inhaler instead? Viruses effect my BG, any type of illness does. Ditch the flonase and get some safeway non steroid nose spray in the 30 ml spray bottle more efective than the smaller one. No efect on BG. I should add that if I restrict my carbs severely - in other words, letting no grains pass my lips and eating large salads,chicken,fish,eggs,nuts etc, that my blood sugar will go back down to around 100-105 (Im not on any meds). I had a spike from 112 up to 165 after 2 hours (I can imagine it was probably 200 after an hour) after eating a small 250 calorie Lean cuisine meal of chicken and noodles - net carbs about 25. I knew the noodles were bad, but I wouldnt have expected that big of a jump from that few carbs. A few days ago, I had a small 15-20 net carb bowl of oatmeal with pecans - my bs was 134 before eating that and 250 two hours later! I double checked that reading with another meter. Is my pancreas finally just giving up? (Ive had diabetes about 12 years). Or could it be virus or flonase related? If it were related to those, I wouldnt think it would return to the 100 level eating only salads,meat,nuts,etc. Seems like it would remain elevated. (my last hba1c was 7.3 - which prompted me to start being very strict with my diet again Continue reading >>

Flonase Patient Information Including Side Effects

Flonase Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Flonase, Veramyst Generic Name: fluticasone nasal (Pronunciation: floo TIK a sone) What is the most important information I should know about fluticasone nasal (Flonase, Veramyst)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using fluticasone nasal (Flonase, Veramyst)? What is fluticasone nasal (Flonase, Veramyst)? Fluticasone is a steroid. It prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation. Fluticasone nasal is used to treat nasal symptoms such as congestion, sneezing, and runny nose caused by seasonal or year-round allergies. Fluticasone nasal is for use in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Fluticasone nasal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of fluticasone nasal (Flonase, Veramyst)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: severe or ongoing nosebleeds; noisy breathing, runny nose, or crusting around your nostrils; redness, sores, or white patches in your mouth or throat; fever, chills, weakness, nausea, vomiting, flu symptoms; any wound that will not heal; or blurred vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights. Less serious side effects may include: headache, back pain; minor nosebleed; menstrual problems, loss of interest in sex; sinus pain, cough, sore throat; or sores or white patches inside or around your nose. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about fluti Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Flonase

Side Effects Of Flonase

Lisabetta Divita is a physician whose love for writing flourished while she was exposed to all facets of the medical field during her training. Her writings are currently featured in prominent medical magazines and various online publications. She holds a doctorate in medicine, a master's in biomedicine, and a Bachelor of Science in biology from Boston College. Flonase (generic name: fluticasone) is a medication used to manage symptoms of seasonal and perennial (continual) allergies. It belongs to a category of medicines called corticosteroids and reduces such symptoms as nasal congestion, runny nose and sneezing. According to MedlinePlus, Flonase is available as a nasal spray that must be applied to each nostril one to two times daily. In seven controlled clinical trials in the United States composed of 536 patients with seasonal or perennial allergies receiving 200mcg of Flonase, the National Library of Medicine reports that 16.1 percent of patients developed a headache, 7.8 percent developed pharyngitis (sore throat), 6.9 percent developed epistaxis (nose bleeds), 3.2 percent experienced nasal irritation and 2.6 percent developed nausea and vomiting. In this same study, 3.3 percent developed such asthmatic symptoms as wheezing and difficulty breathing, while 3.8 percent developed a cough. MedlinePlus says that stomach discomfort, diarrhea and dizziness are other common side effects. Tell your doctor if these symptoms continue. According to MedlinePlus, Flonase can cause severe side effects such as hives, rashes, difficulty breathing, muscle weakness and extreme fatigue. It can also cause acne, white patches in your mouth or throat, problems seeing and swelling of your extremities, face, tongue, lips and throat. Flonase can also cause changes in your menstrual period Continue reading >>

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Flonase - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Flonase - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 64 year old man who takes Omeprazole NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Inhaled Cortisone Raises Risk Of Diabetes By 34 Percent And Worsens Existing Cases

Inhaled Cortisone Raises Risk Of Diabetes By 34 Percent And Worsens Existing Cases

As someone who saw her marginal blood sugar control deteriorate dramatically and permanently after a single course of prednisone I know that cortisone can cause permanent damange to blood sugar control. Years ago when I posted about this on the old alt.support.diabetes board, several people sent me emails reporting that the same thing had happened to them. Prescription cortisones had either made them diabetic or, if they were diabetic but in good control, the cortisones had made their blood sugar control much harder, in some cases forcing them to use insulin. My doctors have continued to tell me that the changes that cortisone makes in blood sugar are temporary. Now large study confirms that exposure to another form of cortisone, that found in the inhalers used to treat asthma and allergies, dramatically raises the risk of diabetes and worsens the blood sugar control of people who already have diabetes. The study is: Inhaled corticosteroids linked to increases in diabetes incidence Suissa S. Am J Med. 2010;doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2010.06.019. You can find an excellent summary of the study findings at Endocrinology Today here: ET: Inhaled corticosteroids linked to increases in diabetes incidence Here's the gist of the study as reported by Endocrinology Today: The study cohort was composed of 388,584 patients, with 30,167 experiencing diabetes onset during a mean of 5.5 years of follow-up. Calculations put annual incidence rate at 14.2 per 1,000 patients. Results also revealed that 2,099 patients progressed from oral hypoglycemic treatment to insulin, translating to an annual incidence rate of 14.2 per 1,000 patients for diabetes progression. Data also linked inhaled corticosteroids with a 34% boost in the incidence of diabetes onset (RR=1.34; 95% CI, 1.29-1.39), although th Continue reading >>

Otc Steroid Nasal Sprays

Otc Steroid Nasal Sprays

I took these back when they were by prescription and before I was diabetic. Discontinued them as they caused nose bleeds. This season my allergies are acting up enough for me to reconsider them. But I see the adverse reports associated with steroids and BG. Do these sprays raise one's blood sugar? A1c 7.0 (7/14) 6.3 (4/15) 6.2 (7/15) 5.9 (10/15) 6.1 (1/16) 6.1 (4/16) Cardio and weight training 4-5 times a week Moderate low carb (40-60 grams a day). Amplodipine (10mg 1x), Metformin (1000mg 2x), Atorvastatin (80mg 1x) Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy Most all nasal sprays I have seen caution you to not use if you are diabetic or have one of several medical conditions listed on their packaging. Consult your doctor because it might be just enough to cause you a problem. I feel that even relating my personal experience could be too dangerous for some one else to try. Wish I could be of better help to you. It seems to indicate that Flonase can increase A1c (by about .025%) when used at high doses; that difference is detectable but not clinically relevant (as stated in the study). The doses used were much higher than those typically used by a seasonal allergy user and so I will continue to use Flonase during allergy season. I believe that anybody concerned should monitor their bg closely. Personally, I do not see an increase in bg by using a single spray in each nostril in the morning and another at night as prescribed by my internist. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I would say a spray could raise numbers, depending on how bad you need it might have to out way the use of same. It may or may not raise your BG depending on (a) how often and long you use it and (b) how sensitive you are to small amounts of steroids and (c) if you use other med Continue reading >>

Nasal Steroids And Blood Sugar

Nasal Steroids And Blood Sugar

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Okay everything I can find <<>> nasal steroids do not jack your blood sugar. I have been running over 130 ever since I took two toots in each nostril from my MD's sample bottle, yesterday. I am also on Levofloxacin ... feel lightheaded and still have the infection. Daggit. This is getting ... frustrating. I am used to being in control and do not care for this, one bit. Well, I did not post this jsut to whine (though whining I AM), has anyone ELSE had a reaction from nasal steroid spray? Hi Linda, I used a steroid nasal spray last week for 2 days. Blood sugar went through the roof. Nasal spray was deposited in the bin (trash) Sue thx for your response -- did you have an infection, or was this for allergies ... ? I am still undecided as to which is causing my elevations ... Sue thx for your response -- did you have an infection, or was this for allergies ... ? I am still undecided as to which is causing my elevations ... I have a chronic sinus infection. I have tried different sprays before which did not affect my blood sugars but on the other hand did not help the condition. The new spray (Flixonase) worked a treat but blood sugars though the roof. The steroid in the spray is quite high from what I can gather. I knew it was the spray causing the problem for me because numbers normal as soon as stopped. Generic Flucatasone aqueous solution nasal spray raises my BS noticably. I use it to stave off Hayfever which has triggered my asthma and put me in intensive care in the past. There's a joke in there with terminal hayfever I think? Being on insulin I just increase my dose as needed. Being Continue reading >>

The Effect Of An Inhaled Corticosteroid On Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

The Effect Of An Inhaled Corticosteroid On Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Objective: To determine the effect of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy on glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coexisting asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design: A prospective randomized, double-blind, double-dummy placebo-controlled, crossover investigation of inhaled steroids and oral leukotriene blockers. Setting: A United States Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System outpatient setting. Participants: Adults with type 2 diabetes and asthma or COPD. Methods: Subjects (n=12) were randomized to receive either inhaled fluticasone propionate (440 μg twice daily) and oral placebo, or inhaled placebo and oral montelukast (10 mg/day). After 6 weeks, subjects were switched to the opposite therapy for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in the percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin (%HbA1c) at 6 weeks relative to the baseline value. Results: Ten patients completed the study. The difference between the mean within-subject changes in %HbA1c associated with 6-week periods of fluticasone and the mean changes associated with montelukast therapy was small but statistically significant (mean difference=0.25; P<0.025). Neither fluticasone nor oral montelukast therapy for 6 weeks led to a significantly different mean % HbA1c compared with the relevant baseline (mean differences=0.11 and −0.14, respectively). Conclusion: The absence of a clinically significant within-subject difference in the changes in %HbA1c associated with fluticasone versus oral montelukast therapy, or between either therapy or baseline does not warrant recommending changes in therapy for asthma or diabetes in patients with these co-morbid conditions. However, we suggest that clinicians carefully monitor blood glucose con Continue reading >>

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Spring is really starting to burst out here in Massachusetts. The tulips are blooming and leaves and buds are popping out on the trees. As pretty and welcoming as this is, many of you (about 50 million!) are probably bracing yourself for all of the pollen that is soon to follow, and suffering through the misery that it can bring. Thanks to the mild winter that we had in the Northeast, plants are pollinating earlier than usual. As if that weren’t bad enough, having seasonal allergies can also affect your blood sugar control. Seasonal allergies: do you have them? Seasonal allergies are sometimes called hay fever or, more technically, seasonal allergic rhinitis. You might be wondering if your symptoms are due to a cold, flu, or allergies. While there can be some overlap, the following symptoms are usually indicative of allergies: • Itchy eyes • Watery eyes • Dark circles under the eyes • Sneezing • Runny nose • Stuffy nose • Sore throat You might also feel a little bit tired. You won’t get a fever from allergies, however. These symptoms can linger for weeks unless they’re treated. Treating allergies There are a number of remedies for seasonal allergies, including oral medications, nasal sprays, and eye drops. It’s important that you not only choose the right one for your symptoms, but that you also are aware of how these medicines might affect your blood sugars. The following types of allergy medicines may affect your blood glucose levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines can reduce sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy), and fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy). Antihistamines might be combined with a deconge Continue reading >>

Flonase, Flucatasone And High Bs?

Flonase, Flucatasone And High Bs?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does any body use a Flucatasone or similar nasal spray? If so any thoughts on how it affects your BS? Along with the D I've got hayfever, which is at it's worst in the spring, and asthma which only bothers me if I hang out with furry animals OR I let the springtime hayfever get out of control. Some years back all of that conspired to get me an ambulance ride and Easter weekend in Intensive Care on account of I was turning blue. Since then I've been using the Flucatasone every spring to keep the hayfever down. Flucatasone is a steroid anti inflamatory kind of like prednisone but since it's a nose spray it's not supposed to affect anything other than the nose membranes. This is the first spring I've been really monitoring my BS closely and that I have any way to correct for highs. The last couple of days my BS seems to be rising with out any reason. Steroid medications can often raise blood sugar levels. Yes they often do that along with a whole truckload of other nasty side effects. This stuff is supposed to avoid all of that by applying the medication directly to the location it's needed and nowhere else. My GP who prescribed it and my ex endo both told me this was nothing to worry about. But they both had me on NPH until I ditched them last summer. Can't say that I have a high level of confidence as to their knowlege of pharmaceuticals. That's why I'm hoping somebody here has some experience with this or something like. Continue reading >>

Flonase Nasal Spray

Flonase Nasal Spray

What is Flonase? Flonase is a nasal spray containing fluticasone propionate. Fluticasone propionate is a corticosteroid that prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation. Flonase Nasal Spray is used to treat nasal congestion, sneezing, runny nose, and itchy or watery eyes caused by seasonal or year-round allergies. Flonase is for use in adults and children who are at least 4 years old and is available without a prescription. Important information Before using Flonase Nasal Spray, tell your doctor if you have glaucoma or cataracts, liver disease, diabetes, herpes simplex virus of your eyes, tuberculosis or any other infection, sores or ulcers inside your nose, or if you have recently had injury of or surgery on your nose. It may take up to several days of using Flonase nasal spray before your symptoms improve. Tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after a week of treatment. Flonase can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using fluticasone. Do not administer Flonase Nasal Spray to a child younger than 4 years old without medical advice. Corticosteroid medication can affect growth in children. Talk with your doctor if you think your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medicine. Before taking this medicine You should not use Flonase Nasal Spray if you are allergic to fluticasone. Fluticasone can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you already have or recently had. Tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within th Continue reading >>

Flonase Archives - Medshadow

Flonase Archives - Medshadow

Many factors including cost, effectiveness, and availability (over-the-counter vs. prescription) as well as side effects go into the choice of allergy treatments. Consult a medical professional to discuss which option might be best for you. Originally published May 8, 2014. Updated in 2017. Antihistamines (Allegra, Claritin, Zyrtec, etc.) Reduce allergy symptoms by blocking the formation of histamines, the chemicals that your body produces in reaction to allergens and that cause a stuffy or drippy nose and watery or itchy eyes Decongestants (Afrin, Dristan, Sudafed, etc.) Relieve nasal congestion by shrinking swollen tissues and blood vessels inside the nose Jitteriness, sleeplessness, rebound effect (congestion gets worse instead of better) Steroid nasal sprays (Beconase, Flonase, Nasacort, etc.) Treat allergy symptoms by reducing inflammation in the nasal passages Inhibit a chemical your body produces called leukotriene, which makes the nasal passages swell and generate mucus Mast cell stabilizers (Crolom, NasalCrom, etc.) Prevent the release of symptom-causing chemicals, including histamines, when you are exposed to pollens Stinging, burning, redness and swelling of the eyes (if taken as eyedrops); congestion, sneezing, itching, nosebleeds (if taken as a nasal spray) Reduces your bodys sensitivity to allergens by exposing it to very small amounts, which are gradually increased Itchy eyes, shortness of breath, runny nose, tight throat (shots); itchy mouth, throat irritation (pills) Like allergy medicines, they may act as antihistamines, decongestants, leukotriene inhibitors, or mast cell stabilizers; their function varies by herb or formulation. Seeks to restore the proper flow of qi (energy) through the placement of very thin needles into the skin at specific points Continue reading >>

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