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Can Exercise Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

Nihr Dc | Signal - Diet And Exercise Programmes Can Prevent Diabetes In High-risk Individuals

Nihr Dc | Signal - Diet And Exercise Programmes Can Prevent Diabetes In High-risk Individuals

NIHR Signal Diet and exercise programmes can prevent diabetes in high-risk individuals Lifestyle changes can reduce the risk of diabetes by about 40% and overall prevents about four high-risk individuals in 100 developing type 2 diabetes each year. The risk remained low for an average of about seven years after the intervention, but effects did decline over time. Medications including the weight-loss drug orlistat and diabetes drug metformin also reduced risk. But in contrast, there was no evidence of sustained effect after stopping treatment. Type 2 diabetes accounts for a large proportion of the chronic disease burden globally. Past research demonstrated that interventions leading to weight loss could prevent the condition. This review combines international data from over 40 trials looking at the long-term impact of medication and lifestyle modification compared with control. Findings support current NICE recommendations. Lifestyle change programmes, targeting both diet and exercise, are promoted as a central component of care to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes -- Prevention

Understanding Diabetes -- Prevention

Because of the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes, you can do a great deal to reduce your chance of developing the disease by slimming down if you are overweight. This is especially true if diabetes runs in your family. In fact, studies have shown that exercise and a healthy diet can prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes -- a condition that often develops prior to full-blown type 2 diabetes. The medications metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon), and acarbose (Precose) have also been shown to be effective in delaying or preventing type 2 diabetes in those at risk. In someone who already has diabetes, exercise and a nutritionally balanced diet can greatly limit the effects of both types 1 and 2 diabetes on your body. In diabetics, stopping smoking is one of the best ways to help prevent the damaging effects of diabetes. If you smoke, quit; smoking dramatically increases the risk of heart disease, particularly for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Study: Exercise, Diet Reduce Diabetes Risk

Study: Exercise, Diet Reduce Diabetes Risk

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Study: Exercise, Diet Reduce Diabetes Risk Walking 30 minutes each day and watching your diet might help prevent adult-onset diabetes, a federal study suggests. The National Institutes of Health study found that lowering one's body weight by 7 percent an average of 15 pounds through a low-fat diet and exercising for 150 minutes a week can decrease the risk of developing type II diabetes also known as adult-onset diabetes by as much as 58 percent. "Type II diabetes is not inevitable, and the solution may be as simple as getting up off the couch and walking around the block and eating a healthier diet," said Dr. Christopher Saudek, president of the American Diabetes Association. The study also showed that use of the blood sugar-lowering drug metformin, sold by Bristol-Myers Squibb under the brand name Glucophage, lowered participants' risk of developing type II diabetes by 31 percent. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson said in light of the findings, members of his department will go on a diet, and he challenged other federal employees to do the same. He added that the federal government will develop a new public health campaign to fight diabetes. "Today, we have exciting news, exciting proof that when it comes to diabetes, prevention really does work," Thompson said. "Americans weigh more than ever before. And too many people live sedentary lives. Diabetes costs our nation at least $100 billion each and every year." The clinical study involved 3,234 participants from 27 medical centers across the country. Type II diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all cases of diabetes and it is estimated that 10 million Americans are at high risk for developing the disease. Being overweight Continue reading >>

Exercise Reduces Risk Of Diabetes: Study

Exercise Reduces Risk Of Diabetes: Study

People who engage in higher levels of physical activity in their leisure time reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Researchers at the U.K.'s University of Birmingham found that walking, jogging and running are linked to a lower risk in individuals who are at high risk. They also found that low-intensity physical activity helps as well, which makes it possible for older people to improve their health and reduce the risk of diabetes. Over an 18-year period, researchers studied the lifestyles of 44,828 Chinese adults, aged between 20 and 80, who had been recently diagnosed with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) an early warning signal for Type 2 diabetes. Every year 6 percent to 9 percent of individuals with IFG progress to diabetes and, compared to non-diabetics, they have a higher risk of death from vascular and chronic kidney disease. The researchers also tracked the participants' leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). "We found that higher levels of LTPA are associated with a lower risk of diabetes in a large population of Chinese adults with IFG," said Professor Neil Thomas, from the University of Birmingham's Institute of Applied Health Research. "About one fifth of the observed diabetes cases which developed could have been avoided if inactive individuals had engaged in World Health Organization (WHO) recommended levels of exercise," he said. Compared with inactive participants, diabetes risk in individuals reporting low, moderate and high volume LTPA was reduced by 12 percent, 20 percent, and 25 percent respectively after adjusting for physical labor at work and other factors. The study was published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Avoiding diabetes can also increase lifespan. A study published in JAMA found that Type 2 diabetes reduces lifespa Continue reading >>

Exercise And Diet Reduce Risk Of Diabetes, Us Study Shows

Exercise And Diet Reduce Risk Of Diabetes, Us Study Shows

Exercise and diet reduce risk of diabetes, US study shows This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Patients vulnerable to type 2 diabetes can more than halve their risk of developing the disease by eating a low fat diet and taking half an hour of exercise a day, says new US research from the National Institutes of Health. The study found that for patients at risk of type 2 diabetes diet and exercise were more effective than the drug metformin at preventing the disease. The findings come from the diabetes prevention programme, a clinical trial comparing diet and exercise with metformin treatment in preventing type 2 diabetes. It was conducted at 27 US medical centres and involved 3234 people with impaired glucose tolerance, a condition that often precedes diabetes. On the advice of the diabetes prevention programme's external data monitoring board, the trial ended a year early because the data had clearly answered the main research questions. The research has not been published in a journal, but a full report of the study is available on the National Institutes of Health website ( www.nih.gov ). Forty five per cent of the participants were from minority groups in whom type 2 diabetes is disproportionately prevalent, including African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and American Indians. The trial also recruited other high risk groups, including people aged 60 and above, women with a history of gestational diabetes, and people with a first degree relative with type 2 diabetes. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups. One made intensive lifestyle changes, with the aim of reducing weight by 7% through a low fat diet and exercising for 150 minutes a week. A second was treated twice daily with 850 mg metformi Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes

Preventing Diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise among Americans of all ages: 26 million people have some form of the disease; 78 million have pre-diabetes. The good news is that preventive measures can delay the onset of diabetes, and controlling weight and cholesterol, blood pressure and blood glucose levels can help prevent complications once diabetes is present. Proper diet and exercise seem to be the prescription for many common health problems: high blood pressure and cholesterol, heart disease, stroke, and obesity. In fact, health experts recommend proper diet and exercise to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, a condition that also is affecting more and more adolescents who are exchanging outdoor activities for computer games, and carrots and yogurt for chips, cookies, and soda. The National Institutes of Health conducted a breakthrough study to show that diet and exercise can delay diabetes. The clinical trial proved that a half hour of walking or other low-intensity exercise daily, combined with a low-fat diet, reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. Diet and exercise Weight loss resulting from healthy eating and increased physical activity enables muscle cells to use insulin and glucose more efficiently, thus lowering diabetes risk. Lack of exercise can cause muscle cells to lose their sensitivity to insulin, which controls levels of sugar in the blood. "Even if you don't lose weight, exercise will make you stronger and healthier," says endocrinologist Douglas Zlock, MD, medical director of the diabetes center at John Muir Health. "Healthy habits can definitely postpone the onset of diabetes even if they don't prevent it." The certified diabetes educators at John Muir Health are firm believers that those at risk for diabetes can develop a flexible care program w Continue reading >>

This One Thing Is The Highest Risk For Diabetes

This One Thing Is The Highest Risk For Diabetes

Regular exercise plays an important role in the daily maintenance of your blood sugar levels Reducing your daily activity and not exercising, even just for a few days, causes changes in your body that are associated with diabetes Exercise directly impacts your risk of developing diabetes, with regular exercise acting as a strong preventive mechanism When using exercise therapeutically for diabetes, high-intensity, burst-type exercises such as Peak Fitness are key By Dr. Mercola The latest research out of the University of Missouri should be required reading for the 79 million Americans with pre-diabetes and the 26 million with the full-blown disease. Taken together, this amounts to one in four Americans struggling with diabetes and the vast majority of these cases are type 2. When diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, many believe their fate has been sealed and all they can do now is "control" it. More than 50 percent of type 2 diabetics are also not even aware they have diabetes, while millions of others are living in a state of insulin resistance (pre-diabetes) that could progress into diabetes at any time. If someone told you there was a "magic" trick you could do that would almost instantly improve the way your body regulates blood sugar, and also reduce the spikes in blood sugar that occur after a meal (elevations in these spikes, known as postprandial glucose, or PPG, are associated with type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and death), would you do it? Well there is. It's called exercise. And now that you know what it is, the next step is up to you ... Want to Prevent or Reverse Diabetes? Exercise! The amazing thing about exercise is that it exerts its effects very quickly. Sure, you will definitely reap long-term benefits, and exercise is well known to impact chronic diseas Continue reading >>

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

If you stick with it, exercise can reduce your need for blood-sugar-lowering drugs.(ISTOCKPHOTO) You may consider exercise a nuisance, a chore, or simply a bore. But if you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you need to look at physical activity in a whole new light. Now it's a tool. Just like taking a drug or altering your diet, exercise can lower blood sugar on its own, even if you don't lose weight. "Exercising is the most underused treatment and it's so, so powerful," said Sharon Movsas, RD, a diabetes nutrition specialist at the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. For most people with diabetes, exercise is a safe and highly recommended way to reduce the risk of complications. However, check with your doctor to make sure you don't have heart problems, nerve damage, or other issues that need special consideration when you are working out. How exercise affects blood sugar In general, blood sugar drops after exercise and is lower for the next 24 to 48 hours, says Movsas. "If I take a blood sugar reading after aqua-aerobics, I usually notice it's down," says David Mair, 79, of Marquette, Mich. When you exercise, your muscles become more sensitive to insulin and absorb more glucose from the blood. However, like many aspects of type 2 diabetes, the response can be highly personal. Exercise can sometimes boost blood sugar. At first, you'll need to test your blood sugar before, after, and sometimes during exercise, to see how your body responds). Exercise also helps lower blood pressurean important benefit since high blood pressure can contribute to heart attacks, strokes, eye problems, kidney failure, and other type 2 diabetes complications. Next Page: Start slow [ pagebreak ]Start slow and work up Even if you know exercise is good Continue reading >>

Exercise And Diabetes

Exercise And Diabetes

Exercise plays a key role in treating diabetes, particularly in type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes). Type 2 diabetes is becoming increasingly common and appears to be related to the growing number of people who are overweight. Why is weight gain such an issue now? Put simply, if we eat more fuel than our body needs, it's stored as fat. Physical activity burns this energy from food. But compared with 50 years ago, we are pretty inactive: we take cars for journeys of a few hundred yards we sit in trains for hours commuting we spend long periods of the day sat behind desks technology means we spend huge amounts of time watching TV, surfing the Internet, playing computer games, etc, so-called 'couch potatoes'. And for most us, feeding ourselves means a walk along supermarket aisles, not working a plot of land. All this means activity levels have dropped – the result is, as a nation, we're getting larger. How does exercise improve diabetes? Exercise reduces the body's need for insulin by keeping weight down. It also increases the body's sensitivity to insulin, so glucose is used more effectively. Insulin is needed to shift glucose from your blood into your muscles. In the absence of insulin, muscles use fat as an alternative energy source. If this goes on too long, it leads to acidosis – which can be fatal. As long as you have enough insulin in your body, your muscles burn glucose during exercise, naturally reducing your blood sugar level. For all types of diabetes, exercise: lowers blood sugar levels increases the effectiveness of insulin in your body lowers blood pressure lowers levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and increases good cholesterol (HDL) increases fat loss helps weight loss builds muscle mass reduces stress improves wellbeing improves circulation Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

Four Steps To Reduce Diabetes Risk

Four Steps To Reduce Diabetes Risk

(CNN) -- Half of all Americans may be diabetic or prediabetic by 2020, a report from an insurance company warned Tuesday. That's an even bleaker projection than the Centers for Disease Control's recent estimate that one in three Americans would have diabetes by 2050. Current rates show that about one in 10 Americans has diabetes, and the risks increase with age. Even children and teenagers are developing type 2 diabetes. A report released this week by UnitedHealth Group showed that treating diabetes will also take up almost 10 percent of all health care spending. That 10-year price tag: $3.35 trillion. Despite such gloomy projections, diabetes is not inevitable. Practical health changes can lower risk of type 2 diabetes, which occurs more commonly with aging and sedentary lifestyles. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease unrelated to aging or lifestyle. While diabetes projections sound scary, "the numbers are getting people aware about the risk factors and thinking about them," said Beth Mayer-Davis, the president-elect of health care and education at the American Diabetes Association. 4 keys to managing diabetes: How do you rate? Genetics, race and family history affect a person's chances of developing diabetes, but you can take steps to lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. The most important thing: Lose weight "The heavier we are, the tougher it is for our body," said Dr. Armand Krikorian, who specializes in endocrinology and diabetes at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Ohio. "It has to make more insulin to keep the blood sugar under control." Insulin, a substance created in the pancreas, moves glucose from the bloodstream into muscles, fat and liver cells. But in type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't respond to insulin, and glucose builds up in the blood. Ov Continue reading >>

Physical Activity & Diabetes

Physical Activity & Diabetes

Regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do to manage and live well with your diabetes. Regular exercise also has special advantages if you have type 2 diabetes. It can also help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes from developing. Regular physical activity improves your body’s sensitivity to insulin and helps manage your blood glucose (sugar) levels. What is physical activity? Physical activity is any form of movement that causes your body to burn calories. This can be as simple as walking, gardening, cleaning and many other activities you may already do. During a physical activity, active muscles use up glucose as a source of energy. Regular physical activity helps to prevent glucose from building up in your blood. Many people do not get enough physical activity to be healthy in today’s society. Technology and modern living have removed many regular forms of physical activity from our daily lives. Cars replace walking and biking. Elevators and escalators replace stairs. Dishwashers replace doing dishes by hand. Computers replace manual labour. Snow blowers and ride-on lawn mowers replace physical yard work. TV and computer games replace fun physical activities for both children and adults. Because of modern living, it is important to think about being physically active each day. Adding more physical activity to your day is one of the most important things you can do to help manage your diabetes and improve your health. Did you know? Low physical fitness is as strong a risk factor for mortality as smoking. Fitness level is one of the strongest predictors of all-cause mortality in people with diabetes. Physical activity can be as powerful as glucose-lowering medication… with fewer side effects. Regular physical activity, in conjunction wi Continue reading >>

How Does Exercise Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

How Does Exercise Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that by 2050, one in three American adults could have diabetes. Exercise, whether aerobic or resistance-based such as weight training, is considered one of the most effective lifestyle habits individuals at risk can adopt to prevent potential cases from becoming actual cases. It has been shown that exercise has a greater protective effect for those at highest risk. In some instances, exercise has a greater beneficial effect than dietary modifications or even weight loss on the management of blood sugar. Effects on Blood Sugar Regulation Exercise causes skeletal muscle to be more sensitive to insulin, the chemical signal that tells cells to absorb glucose. As a result, exercise speeds the clearance of glucose out of the blood and into skeletal muscle cells, which need glucose in higher quantities during increased activity. Exercise also increases blood flow to muscles, thereby making more glucose available for the muscles to absorb. In older individuals, decreased insulin sensitivity, which is a lowered responsiveness of cells to insulin, is common. This is associated primarily with decreased levels of physical activity and is readily reversed through resumption or increase in exercise levels. There is an alternate pathway, carried out by an enzyme called AMP kinase, that initiates glucose transport from blood to cells without the use of insulin. This is especially important and helpful in light of the prevalence of insulin resistance in those at risk for diabetes. Exercise is found to increase levels of AMP kinase. Certain storage and distribution patterns of fat are seen as red flags for health risks. Individuals who have the tendency to store fat around the abdomen are often found to have other health risk facto Continue reading >>

Exercise Reduces Gestational Diabetes Risk

Exercise Reduces Gestational Diabetes Risk

Carve out time for moderate exercise most days of the week to reduce your chance of developing gestational diabetes and gaining too much weight during pregnancy. Simply going for a daily heart-pumping 45-minute walk throughout your pregnancy may slash your risk of developing gestational diabetes by about a third, according to a new meta-analysis published in BJOB: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The study authors compiled a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that involved 2,800 mostly-sedentary women from the U.S., Spain, Brazil, Norway, Croatia, and New Zealand, and discovered that any moderate exercise during pregnancy reduced the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) by more than 30 percent, and exercising consistently throughout pregnancy slashed that gestational diabetes risk by an additional 6 percent. Preventing gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a pregnancy condition that means excess glucose (blood sugar) passes from the mother's bloodstream through the placenta. Some pregnancy complications that can arise from gestational diabetes include preeclampsia (a serious high blood pressure condition that can be fatal), preterm delivery and delivery of overweight babies, often requiring a Cesarean section. "Moderate exercise" refers to the level of intensity during the workout and was measured by pregnant women whose heart rates were around 140 beats per minute during the workout, or those who reported achieving a level 5 on a 1 to 10 Rate of Perceived Exertion scale. Preventing excessive weight gain This report also found that regular exercise helped prevent excessive maternal weight gain—women who exercised tended to weigh a few pounds less than women who didn't exercise during pregnancy. The American College Of Ob Continue reading >>

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