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Can Endometriosis Cause Diabetes

Endometriosis And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Risk: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

Endometriosis And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Risk: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

Endometriosis and gestational diabetes mellitus risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Prez-Lpez FR, et al. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2018. a Facultad de Medicina , Universidad de Zaragoza & Instituto Aragons de Ciencias de la Salud (IACS) , Zaragoza , Spain. b Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Lozano-Blesa University Hospital , Zaragoza , Spain. c Facultad de Ciencias Mdicas , Institute of Biomedicine, Research Area for Women's Health, Universidad Catlica de Santiago de Guayaquil , Guayaquil , Ecuador. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2018 May;34(5):363-369. doi: 10.1080/09513590.2017.1397115. Epub 2017 Nov 5. OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis regarding endometriosis and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). METHODS: We carried out a search of the following databases: Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Scielo, Clinicaltrials.gov, the UK Clinical Trials Gateway, and the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, from inception through April 28 2017, without language restrictions, in order to evaluate the effect of endometriosis over GDM risk, in women with and without endometriosis. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) or mean differences (MDs) were calculated as effects. Methodological quality of evidence was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and heterogeneity among studies with the I2 statistic. Random-effects models were used for meta-analyses, and publication bias was assessed with Egger's test. RESULTS: We identified 12 studies (10 cohort and two case control studies) with a total of 48,762 pregnancies, including 3,461 with endometriosis. Endometriosis had no significant effect on GDM risk (OR =1.14; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.51; p = .35, I2 = 56%, Egger's test p = .45). Secondary ou Continue reading >>

9 Things I Do When My Illnesses Make Me Want To Scream

9 Things I Do When My Illnesses Make Me Want To Scream

Let’s face it. Chronic illness can be hard. It can also be annoying. Plus, it can wear you out when you’re trying to live your life and chase your dreams. There are moments I really want to scream. I want to scream “Why me?” I want to scream “It’s not fair.” Especially when I feel like I’m doing every right and trying as hard as I can but things still aren’t going right — my body still isn’t cooperating with me. Which… happens a lot when you have a chronic illness. And you know what? Sometimes, that’s what it takes to help me get through that moment. Occasionally it takes more than that moment. When I feel stuck in my emotions, I try to remind myself of things and do something. 1. I try to remember the influence of social and gender norms on my outlook and in life. A lot of this pressure I feel comes from that. I’m supposed to be a “productive” member of society who is supposed to say I’m fine even if I’m not. It’s a pressure we all feel, not just related to chronic illness. It feels heavier related to my chronic illness, but these are not the norms we have to live by. 2. Did someone say something to me? Made an ignorant or possibly hurtful comment? I try to educate the person instead of reacting harshly (which is what I typically did growing up). I also tell myself, Hey, you aren’t in elementary, middle or high school anymore. People aren’t as cruel — plus you don’t hear these comments on a regular basis anymore. 3. I remind myself that it isn’t about being better than everyone or being “extreme.” 4. Cry. Just as simple as that. I let it out. Crying is good for you. 5. Tell myself it’s OK to feel this way, but I need to pull myself out of it. 6. Is this happening a lot recently? Maybe I need to revisit counseling. 7 Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes, Endometriosis

Pre-diabetes, Endometriosis

I was on Natpro for a while and went off of it because my blood sugar levels were high and I had no other explanation as to why that would be the case. I also read that progesterone raises blood sugar and is used for hypoglycemia. I was 46 years old at the time. I am currently 47 years old. I have never been overweight in any way and eat decently. Diabetes does run in my family and a few relatives have died from complications of diabetes, so I am very afraid of developing full diabetes. I had a reading of 5.8 at 46 and then 5.5 at 47, so I am looking to reduce my blood sugar levels. I also suffer from endometriosis. I've been treated many times for endometriosis through laparascopic surgery since the age of 19. I suspect I started suffering from endometriosis since I was 16 years old. I've had issues with cysts as well on and off throughout the years. I also have symptoms of perimenopause, so I suspect that my blood sugar levels are being affected by this as well. I miss my Natpro as I have been experiencing some pain and the last one had me crying with shooting pains down my leg. I need some relief and would like to go back on Natpro, but I am afraid of the higher blood sugar levels. Is there any truth to blood sugar levels being raised by natural progesterone? Continue reading >>

Endometriosis: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Endometriosis: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Allergies, asthma , chemical sensitivities, autoimmune diseases, chronic fatigue syndrome , fibromyalgia , breast cancer , and ovarian cancer are linked to women and families with endometriosis. Endometriosis sees the endometrial implant tissue, normally found, in the uterus build up in other parts of the body. Endometrial tissue consists of gland, blood cells, and connective tissue. It normally grows in the uterus, to prepare the lining of the womb for ovulation . Endometrial implants are buildups of endometrial tissue that grow in locations outside the uterus. When they grow outside the uterus, this is called endometriosis. They can develop anywhere in the body, but they usually occur in the pelvic area. Normally, this tissue is expelled during menstruation, but displaced tissue cannot do this. This leads to physical symptoms, such as pain. As the lesions grow larger, they can affect bodily functions. For example, the fallopian tubes may be blocked. The pain and other symptoms can affect different areas of life, including the ability to work, medical care costs, and difficulty maintaining relationships. Endometriosis can lead to painful cramps in the pelvis. Other medical conditions such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ovarian cysts , and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can mimic the symptoms of endometriosis. It is important to see a health care provider about symptoms, to avoid future complications. A hysterectomy, or the removal of the uterus, will be considered when all other avenues of treatment have been exhausted. Surgery is possible, but it is normally considered only if other treatments are not effective. Pain medications: Either over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or prescrip Continue reading >>

Women And Diabetes | Diabetesnet.com

Women And Diabetes | Diabetesnet.com

Mon, 11/15/2010 - 11:33 -- Richard Morris Fluctuations in hormone levels occur through the menstrual cycle and these fluctuations can affect blood sugar control. When estrogen levels are naturally high, your body may be resistant to its own insulin or injected insulin. Many women find their blood sugar tends to be high 3-5 days before, during or after their periods. Since everyone is different, the only way to manage blood sugars in a setting where sensitivity to insulin changes is to test and record blood sugars four or more times a day the week before, during and after your period for at least 2 or 3 months to find your own pattern. This allows you to adjust your insulin doses and carb intake both before and during this time to better control your blood sugar. Premenstrual symptoms (PMS) can be worsened by poor blood sugar control. It helps to chart your feelings such as tenderness, bloating, grouchiness for a week before, during and after your period. Charting will help you know when your PMS reach their peak during your period so that before your PMS is most severe, you can check your blood sugar more often and take extra insulin or exercise to bring high blood sugars down. Food cravings during PMS are triggered by an increase in progesterone and can make it more difficult to control your blood sugar. Usually the craving is for chocolate or sweet foods. Give in to your cravings by trying sugar-free and fat-free versions, such as chocolate pudding. Take extra insulin or increase your exercise to compensate. You may feel less like exercising during your period. If so, extra insulin may be a good choice for keeping your blood sugar from rising. The extra insulin needed to overcome insulin resistance during this time will not cause weight gain. Treat yourself well duri Continue reading >>

Endometriosis May Even Cause Intestinal Contractions And Hypoglycemia

Endometriosis May Even Cause Intestinal Contractions And Hypoglycemia

Endometriosis may even cause intestinal contractions and hypoglycemia Last Updated on Tue, 13 Dec 2016 | Endometriosis A study by Baylor University looked at a group of women with endometriosis and found they had increased frequency of contractions within the muscle layer of the intestine, which can be related to the production of prostaglandins and other substances by the endometrial implants. (Prostaglandins are produced in the endometriosis and then released into the surrounding tissues, blood vessels, and lymphatic tissue.) This occurrence may also account for cramping and intestinal symptoms in women who have endometriosis in places besides the intestines. Furthermore, the same study had another odd conclusion: Women with endometriosis also had reactive hypoglycemia (a drop in blood sugar ) during a glucose tolerance test, even though the women had normal insulin levels. Two possible reasons for this conclusion are 1 Women with endometriosis may be more sensitive to the actions of insulin than women without endometriosis. 1 Nerves that help control the actions of the intestines may overreact to the amount of insulin present. Eying where endometriosis attacks the targe intestine Endometriosis is more common in the large intestine and can show up there in many different ways. The following list shows the areas where endometrio-sis can invade your large intestines and the symptoms it causes. 1 The pelvic portion. Endometriosis most often affects the pelvic portion, including the sigmoid colon (last section of the large intestine) and the rectum. Meanwhile, the retroperitoneal (the length of intestine that passes under the abdominal cavity covering, or peritoneum ) part of the large intestine can be shielded from endometriosis by this peritoneum. The definition of tru Continue reading >>

Endometriosis Linked To Other Diseases

Endometriosis Linked To Other Diseases

Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Common in Women With Endometriosis Sept. 26, 2002 -- Women with endometriosis are at increased risk for a host of other diseases including chronic fatigue syndrome , multiple sclerosis , lupus , underactive thyroid , and rheumatoid arthritis , according to new government findings. Researchers from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHHD) report data from a survey of endometriosis patients in the latest issue of the journal Human Reproduction. One in five patients said they'd been diagnosed with a second disease, and one in three of these patients reported having chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia . This is the first study to link various immune system or hormonal diseases to endometriosis, a common condition in which uterine tissue grows outside the womb. As many as one in 10 women of reproductive age has endometriosis, which can result in disabling pelvic pain , irregular bleeding, and infertility . "These findings confirm for the first time what we have been hearing from members for years," says Mary Lou Ballweg, Endometriosis Association president. "We have been following immune disorders and endometriosis since 1980, but this is the first real, strong data to show a link," she tells WebMD. Close to 3,700 patients completed the Endometriosis Association survey, which also showed an average delay of almost a decade between the onset of endometriosis symptoms and diagnosis. Most women with the disease are diagnosed in their mid-to-late 20s, but 38% of the women surveyed began having symptoms before age 15. "Unfortunately, most pediatricians and adolescent medical specialists don't take pelvic pain seriously, and they don't think about endometriosis," NICHHD researcher Pamela Stratton, MD, tells WebMD. "E Continue reading >>

Endometriosis: Causes, Complications, And Treatment

Endometriosis: Causes, Complications, And Treatment

lower back pain that may occur at any time during your menstrual cycle You may also have no symptoms. Its important that you get regular gynecological exams, which will allow your gynecologist to monitor any changes. This is particularly important if you have two or more symptoms. Understandably, you want quick relief from pain and other symptoms of endometriosis. This condition can disrupt your life if its left untreated. Endometriosis has no cure, but its symptoms can be managed. Medical and surgical options are available to help reduce your symptoms and manage any potential complications. Your doctor may first try conservative treatments. They may then recommend surgery if your condition doesnt improve. Everyone reacts differently to these treatment options. Your doctor will help you find the one that works best for you. It may be frustrating to get diagnosis and treatment options early in the disease. Because of the fertility issues, pain, and fear that there is no relief, this disease can be difficult to handle mentally. Consider finding a support group or educating yourself more on the condition. Treatment options include: You can try over-the-counter pain medications such as ibuprofen ( Advil ), but these arent effective in all cases. Taking supplemental hormones can sometimes relieve pain and stop its progression. This therapy helps your body to regulate the monthly changes in hormones that promote the tissue growth that occurs when you have endometriosis. Hormonal contraceptives decrease fertility by preventing the monthly growth and buildup of endometrial tissue. Birth control pills , patches , and vaginal rings can reduce or even eliminate the pain in less-severe endometriosis. The medroxyprogesterone (Depo-Provera) injection is also effective in stopping me Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Infertility: When Blood Sugar Control Isn’t Enough

Diabetes And Infertility: When Blood Sugar Control Isn’t Enough

An excerpt from the book, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby. Maybe your blood sugars have been great and you’ve been having ongoing sex with your partner. But if you’re still not pregnant after six to twelve months of trying, you’re considered infertile. Dealing with infertility and diabetes can feel like an energy-draining double whammy of health issues, but you’re not alone. There’s a definite group of women with diabetes who require even more maintenance and medical specialists to figure out why, once again, their bodies aren’t doing what seems to come naturally for everyone else. What’s Going On? Infertility is an inability to get pregnant. You are considered infertile after a year of actively trying to conceive (i.e., having unprotected sex around the time you ovulate) if you are younger than 35, and after six months if you’re 35 or older, or if you have a history of many miscarriages. The timeframe is key: It can take some fertile couples that long to conceive naturally, while older women are advised to seek help sooner since fertility declines rapidly with age. About 10 to 15 percent of all couples experience infertility. Of those, about 40 to 50 percent are caused by female infertility, while another 30 to 40 percent are caused by male infertility. The rest are either a combination of male and female factors, or are simply unexplained as one of life’s many mysteries. Several factors can lead to infertility, according to the national infertility association RESOLVE: age, weight, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Fallopian tube disease, endometriosis, exposure to a chemical known as Diethylstilbestrol (DES), smoking, and alcohol use. Diabetes and Infertility: Are They Related? While all the above are ge Continue reading >>

Women With Endometriosis Have Higher Comorbidities: Analysis Of Domestic Data In Taiwan - Sciencedirect

Women With Endometriosis Have Higher Comorbidities: Analysis Of Domestic Data In Taiwan - Sciencedirect

Volume 79, Issue 11 , November 2016, Pages 577-582 Author links open overlay panel Sen-WenTengab Huann-ChengHorngcd Chi-HongHocd Ming-ShyenYencd Hsiang-TaiChaocd Peng-HuiWangcde The Taiwan Association of Gynecology Systematic Review Group ** Open Access funded by Chinese Medical Association Endometriosis, defined by the presence of viable extrauterine endometrial glands and stroma, can grow or bleed cyclically, and possesses characteristics including a destructive, invasive, and metastatic nature. Since endometriosis may result in pelvic inflammation, adhesion, chronic pain, and infertility, and can progress to biologically malignant tumors, it is a long-term major health issue in women of reproductive age. In this review, we analyze the Taiwan domestic research addressing associations between endometriosis and other diseases. Concerning malignant tumors, we identified four studies on the links between endometriosis and ovarian cancer, one on breast cancer, two on endometrial cancer, one on colorectal cancer, and one on other malignancies, as well as one on associations between endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome, one on links with migraine headache, three on links with pelvic inflammatory diseases, four on links with infertility, four on links with obesity, four on links with chronic liver disease, four on links with rheumatoid arthritis, four on links with chronic renal disease, five on links with diabetes mellitus, and five on links with cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, etc.). The data available to date support that women with endometriosis might be at risk of some chronic illnesses and certain malignancies, although we consider the evidence for some comorbidities to be of low quality, for example, the association between colon cancer an Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Endometriosis!?

Diabetes And Endometriosis!?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Just wondering if anyone else here has insulin dependent diabetes and also suffers from Endometriosis? I do I am type 1 diabetic with endometriosis. I find that it really raises my sugar levels but I manage the pain with my anti spasm tablets. During my period I take a slight increase in insulin. Sorry not much use but just to let u know that ur not alone. Xxx Hi there.. same here t1, controlled thyroid, snd newly diagnosed with Endometriosis. I went to see the dr. Having severe groin pains and back ache.. they said the only way to get rid of them is surgery, but im t1 , i dont know if that will be safe.. How were you diagnosed with endometriosis? Symptoms or an ultrasound scan? I was treated for endometriosis for about 15 years - drugs, D&Cs, the lot - until someone thought to send me for an ultrasound scan. No "chocolate cysts", no sign of anything related to endometriosis. Only an additional 4 stone on me because of the drugs :roll: After that they decided to call it "dysmenorrhoea", which basically means "heavy periods, lots of pain but no-one knows why". My symptoms were back ache, extreme pain in the cervix area caused by inflammation, really heavy periods (12 night-time towels in 18 hours was the worst ever) including clots like lumps of liver. Pain-killers and anti-inflammatories wouldn't touch it. Sometimes the pain was so severe I was literally sick with it. Also my periods were irregular - ie, more frequent. Just what I needed! I don't know how I managed not to Continue reading >>

Endometriosis Part 2: The Link Between Sugar And The Immune System

Endometriosis Part 2: The Link Between Sugar And The Immune System

So how does sugar impact on our immune system? Sugar and its food products can interfere with the way the white blood cells of your immune system clear up the debris. Reducing your intake of these foods can have a direct beneficial impact on your immune system. Sugar also reduces the number of beneficial bacteria that live in the gut. As this bacteria is needed for us to absorb nutrients from our food, a diet high in sugar can quickly lead to poor nutrition and vulnerability to gut complaints. It hinders the absorption of the minerals calcium, chromium and magnesium we need for a fully functioning hormonal system and energy production. Chromium and magnesium are also fundamental for balancing the amount of glucose in our system, therefore without these nutrients in full supply, we can suffer from a blood sugar condition called hypoglycaemia that can then lead to diabetes. Sugar also blocks your production of anti-inflammatory prostaglandins, actively encouraging the inflammatory nature of endometriosis. In addition, sugar increases fat, which increases oestrogen production. Sugar, like alcohol, is also an anti-nutrient, depleting the body of valuable vitamins and minerals. Eating foods with sugar causes your pancreas to produce insulin and can encourage an increase in fat cells and, of course, weight gain. Fat cells produce something called aromatase enzyme and produces small amounts of oestrogen. Therefore the more fat cells you have the more oestrogen you produce. Hence a diet of excess sugar has a link to breast cancer as well. Too much glucose in the bloodstream also encourages the production of prostaglandin 2 (PGE2), the chemical released by our immune system to cause inflammation. Our immune system is not just responsible for fighting off colds and flu, it is al Continue reading >>

Endometriosis: What Is Endometriosis? Endometriosis Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis - Ucla

Endometriosis: What Is Endometriosis? Endometriosis Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis - Ucla

Women with PCOS may receive $840! View this Clinical Trial > Endometriosis is when the tissue that makes up the uterine lining (the lining of the womb) is present on other organs inside your body. Endometriosis is usually found in the lower abdomen, or pelvis, but can appear anywhere in the body. Women with endometriosis often have lower abdominal pain, pain with periods, or pain with sexual intercourse, and may report having a hard time getting pregnant. On the other hand, some women with endometriosis may not have any symptoms at all. Endometriosis is estimated to affect between 3% and 10% of reproductive-aged women. Endometriosis can only be truly diagnosed by a doctor performing a laparoscopy (a surgery where a doctor looks in the abdomen with a camera usually through the belly button) and taking a sample of a suspected abnormality. Thus, the proportion of women affected by endometriosis differs among women having surgery for different reasons. In women without symptoms who are having surgery for elective sterilization (having their tubes tied), 1-7% will actually have endometriosis diagnosed at the time of their surgery, as will 12-32% of women having surgery for pelvic pain, and 9-50% of women having surgery for infertility. Endometriosis is rarely found in girls before they start their period, but it is found in up to half of young girls and teens with pelvic pain and painful periods. There are several different ideas of how and why endometriosis happens. One idea is that when a woman has her period, some of the blood and tissue from her uterus travels out through the fallopian tubes and into the abdominal cavity. This is called retrograde menstruation. Another idea is that some cells in the body outside of the uterus can change to become the same kind of cells Continue reading >>

Endometriosis: Health System 'oblivious To Suffering' Of One In 10 Women Affected By 'silent Epidemic'

Endometriosis: Health System 'oblivious To Suffering' Of One In 10 Women Affected By 'silent Epidemic'

Endometriosis: Health system 'oblivious to suffering' of one in 10 women affected by 'silent epidemic' With one in 10 women affected by endometriosis, chances are you know a woman who has it. No dedicated medical professional for endometriosis, women "have to become own expert" Endometriosis as common as asthma and diabetes In 2016, NHMRC allocated $14.7m to asthma research, $64.1m to diabetes research, $837,433 to endometriosis research But, given it takes an average of seven to 10 years to diagnose the disease experts call the "silent epidemic", she may not even know she has it. And advocates say she will almost certainly be forced to become a self-taught expert on the incurable disease because there is no such thing as an endometriosis specialist, and not enough money is spent on research. Women with endometriosis cannot receive a complete treatment from one doctor because of its "complicated maze of symptoms" including pelvic pain, heavy or irregular periods, bowel and bladder symptoms and fertility problems, Pelvic Pain Foundation of Australia director Dr Susan Evans said. "There is no area of medicine that feels completely trained to cover all the aspects of a woman with endometriosis's care," Dr Evans said. "It's up to women to learn themselves to recognise what's happening. "[But] it is very hard for a lot of women to learn all that by themselves." She said that, along with a lack of public awareness, meant women were "falling through the cracks". Many women have never heard of endometriosis, and some think their symptoms are "just part of being a woman", Dr Evans said. But doctors are also often unfamiliar with the disease, in which tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows in other parts of the body, and they may not recognise it in patients leading to Continue reading >>

Tame Your Blood Sugar, Calm Your Endo

Tame Your Blood Sugar, Calm Your Endo

Do you have blood sugar regulation issues? If you have hypoglycemia, relate to the word hangry (hungry+angry), have huge ups and downs with your energy throughout the day. If you are hungry ALL the time, rely on a steady stream of snacks, get shaky or lightheaded when you dont eat. If you wake up in the middle of the night wide-awake OR cant go for more than a few hours without being hungry, it can be assumed you have some blood sugar regulation issues. The more symptoms or the more severity, the more you can see the significance blood sugar plays a roll in your life... for the worse. This is the "blood sugar out of control" emoji. Can you relate? Also, if you follow a low fat diet or even find yourself under-eating or slashing calories and still gaining weight or maintaining, you can also assume youre in this club due to something called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is directly related to poor blood sugar handling and if unchecked will lead to PCOS, pre-diabetes, and eventually diabetes. In these cases you most definitely can assume youre in this category. If you've woken up in the morning for a fasting blood test (where you don't eat beforehand) so they can test your glucose levels, which ended up "fine", you may think you're in the clear. Here's the thing, that test will often will only catch blood sugar issues once they become incredibly severe, like how cancer is often only diagnose after it's metastasized all over. If you want to stop the issue before it gets to that stage, read on :) What the heck is blood sugar regulation? I promise not to bore you Have you ever cut yourself and noticed the blood was sticky? Congratulations, you've meet your blood sugar. Sugar in its simplest form is called "glucose", and your body needs glucose to function. Your bloo Continue reading >>

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