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Can Eating Too Much Sugar Make You Diabetic?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

It's almost impossible to completely eliminate sugar from your diet. You can certainly limit how much you eat, but if you enjoy too much sugar, can you get diabetes from eating too much sugar? The answer is complicated, but diets and lifestyles can lead to this disease. Read on to learn more about the condition, its effect on oral health, and what you can do to prevent and manage diabetes. What Is Diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association, carbohydrates increase blood glucose levels, not sugar. Type 2 diabetes is directly related to being overweight, the biggest risk factor of diabetes, and obesity results from eating calories from any food source. Don't confuse the two kinds of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a genetic disease where the body doesn't produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, also known as adult-onset, occurs when the body doesn't use insulin properly, leading to insulin resistance. Even if the pancreas tries to increase production, eventually it can't control blood sugar levels. Diabetes and Your Mouth What does this condition mean for oral health? It has long been recognized that a diet high in carbohydrates feeds cavity-forming bacteria in your mouth. These bacteria also form acids that break down the enamel and other tooth structures, resulting in decay. But did you know if you have diabetes you are at a higher risk for gum problems, including periodontitis and other infections? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, high blood glucose levels influence the severity of gum disease. There is more sugar present in a diabetic's saliva compared to the average healthy person. This sugar in the saliva promotes the growth of bacteria that then forms plaque. Additionally, gum disease may ma Continue reading >>

8 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

8 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

Sugar is delicious. Anyone who denies that is lying. But because life is unfair, sugar, especially in copious amounts, is really bad for your health. In fact, once you learn about all the ways sugar impacts your body, it's difficult to look at it the same way (despite knowing how heavenly it tastes). So how do you know if you're eating too much? Here are eight red flags your body is sending you that it's time to cut back on the sweet stuff. 1. You constantly crave sugary things. The more sugar you eat, the more you'll crave it. "More cravings then equal consuming more sugar—it becomes a vicious and addictive cycle," Brooke Alpert, M.S., R.D., author of The Sugar Detox: Lose Weight, Feel Great and Look Years Younger, tells SELF. This isn't just because your taste buds have adapted and left you needing more and more to get that same taste, but also because of how sugar gives you a high followed by a crash, just like an actual drug. "By eating a high sugar diet, you cause a hormonal response in your body that’s like a wave, it brings you up and then you crash down and it triggers your body to want more sugar." 2. You feel sluggish throughout the day. What goes up must come down. After sugar causes an initial spike of insulin and that "high" feeling, it causes an inevitable crash. "Energy is most stable when blood sugar is stable, so when you’re consuming too much sugar, the highs and lows of your blood sugar lead to highs and lows of energy," Alpert says. Eating a lot of sugar also means it's likely you're not eating enough protein and fiber, both important nutrients for sustained energy. 3. Your skin won't stop breaking out. "Some people are sensitive to getting a spike in insulin from sugar intake, which can set off a hormonal cascade that can lead to a breakout li Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. Because blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, a common notion has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. The American Diabetes Association and Diabetes UK have labeled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center, which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Sugar can play an aiding and abetting role in diabetes, but the idea that “eating sugar causes diabetes” is simplistic and interferes with efforts to help the public understand the actual causes of the disease and how to protect themselves and their families. Here is what you need to know: The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it, you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort Continue reading >>

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

5 Ways to Beat Bad Breath Why Orgasms Feel Good WebMD Expert Answers: Is sugar the enemy? Where does/can it fit in the diet of someone with diabetes? Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar?

What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar?

By Dr. Mercola You add it to your morning cup of coffee or tea. You bake it into pastries, cakes, and cookies. You even sprinkle it all over your breakfast cereal or your oatmeal for added "flavor." But that's not all. It's also hidden in some beloved "treats" that people consume on a daily basis, such as sodas, fruit juices, candies, and ice cream. It also lurks in almost all processed foods, including breads, meats, and even your favorite condiments like Worcestershire sauce and ketchup. It's none other than sugar. Most people view sugary foods as tasty, satisfying, and irresistible treats. But I believe that there are three words that can more accurately describe sugar: toxic, addicting, and deadly. Sugar, in my opinion, is one of the most damaging substances that you can ingest – and what's terrifying about it is that it's just so abundant in our everyday diet. This intense addiction to sugar is becoming rampant, not just among adults, but in children as well. But how exactly does sugar work in our body, and what are the side effects of eating too much sugar on people's health? Why Is Excessive Sugar Bad for Your Health? Today, an average American consumes about 32 teaspoons of sugar per day. New numbers came out in February 2015. The Washington Post did a story on it using grams (4 grams = 1 tsp). They quoted Euromonitor's study, which said Americans are now consuming 126 grams, which would equal close to 32 teaspoons. Euromonitor's study costs $1200 to access; the Washington Post interprets the study for free here. It's definitely alarming, considering the average Englishman during the 1700s only consumed four pounds of sugar per year1 – and that's most likely from healthful natural sources like fruits, and not from the processed foods you see in supermarket s Continue reading >>

15 Disturbing Consequences Of Eating Too Much Sugar

15 Disturbing Consequences Of Eating Too Much Sugar

Can you stop at one?Ginny / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0 People have been sounding warnings about the dangers of too much sugar for a long time. As early as 1957, John Yudkin, a professor of nutrition at Queen Elizabeth College in London, began arguing that when it came to heart disease and other chronic ailments, sugar — not fat — was the primary culprit. Yet decades ago, after a landmark study by a team of Harvard scientists pointed to fat as the primary dietary risk factor for heart disease, Yudkin's hypothesis was buried, and fat became public enemy No. 1. Now it turns out that the sugar industry deliberately engineered that groundbreaking study, compensating the scientists for their efforts that essentially let sugar off the hook. That's the conclusion of a September 12 report in JAMA Internal Medicine, which summarized an analysis of historical industry documents. Even before that eye-opening report, however, evidence documenting the ill effects of too much sugar has continued to pile up. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says people should cap consumption at 50 grams of sugar a day — about 4 tablespoons or a little more than a can of Coke. The World Health Organization (WHO), meanwhile, suggests no more than half that amount for best results. Yet the average American, trained to be wary of fat, gobbles up 22 teaspoons of sugar per day. And now we can say for sure: We should never have abandoned a diet rich in healthy fats, and all that sugar we're eating instead is associated with a litany of health problems — just as Yudkin suggested all those decades ago. Keep scrolling to see the potential consequences of eating too much sugar, according to the latest scientific research. Cavities. Trust your dentist on this one: Of all of sugar's potential ills, the conne Continue reading >>

Myth: Sugar Causes Diabetes

Myth: Sugar Causes Diabetes

We all know the stereotype – if you’ve got diabetes, you must have eaten too much sugar. But, with this sweet ingredient found in so much of our food – and, recently, so many of our newspapers – what’s the truth about sugar? And how does it affect diabetes? What is sugar? Sugar is found naturally in fruit, vegetables and dairy foods. It’s also added to food and drink by food manufacturers, or by ourselves at home. The debate about sugar and health is mainly around the ‘added sugars’. This includes: table sugar that we add to our hot drinks or breakfast cereal caster sugar, used in baking sugars hidden in sauces, ready meals, cakes and drinks. Does sugar cause diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the insulin producing cells in your pancreas are destroyed by your immune system. No amount of sugar in your diet – or anything in your lifestyle – has caused or can cause you to get Type 1 diabetes. With Type 2 diabetes, though we know sugar doesn’t directly causes Type 2 diabetes, you are more likely to get it if you are overweight. You gain weight when you take in more calories than your body needs, and sugary foods and drinks contain a lot of calories. And it's important to add that fatty foods and drinks are playing a part in our nation's expanding waistline. So you can see if too much sugar is making you put on weight, then you are increasing your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes. But Type 2 diabetes is complex, and sugar is unlikely to be the only reason the condition develops. If I have diabetes, can I eat sugar? Having diabetes doesn’t mean you have to cut sugar out of your diet completely. We all enjoy eating sugary foods occasionally, and there’s no problem including them as a treat Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dessert

Diabetes And Dessert

Eating desserts with diabetes A popular misconception about diabetes is that it is caused by eating too many sugary foods. While sweets can and do affect your blood sugar, they do not cause you to develop diabetes. However, when you have diabetes, you must carefully monitor your carbohydrate intake. This is because carbohydrates are responsible for raising your blood sugar levels. While you can enjoy sugary foods when you have diabetes, it is important to do so in moderation and with some understanding of how it could impact your blood sugar. This includes sugars found in desserts. 10 Diabetes Diet Myths » When you have diabetes, your body is either not able to use insulin correctly or not able to make any or enough insulin. Some people with diabetes experience both of these issues. Problems with insulin can cause sugar to build up in your blood since insulin is responsible for helping sugar move from the blood and into the body’s cells. Foods that contain carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carbohydrates need to be regulated when you have diabetes to help you manage your blood sugar. On nutrition labels, the term “carbohydrates” includes sugars, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. In desserts, a number of sweet-tasting ingredients can be added to enhance sweetness. While some foods, such as fruits, naturally contain sugars, most desserts have some type of sugar added to them. Many dessert labels will not list “sugar” as a key ingredient. Instead, they will list the ingredient as one or more of the following: dextrose fructose high-fructose corn syrup lactose malt syrup sucrose white granulated sugar honey agave nectar glucose maltodextrin These sugar sources are carbohydrates and will raise your blood sugar. They can be found in cookies, cakes, pies, puddings, ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only cause of weight gain. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy them sometimes. People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is not Continue reading >>

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

A: Not specifically. But too much of any unhealthy food can make you fat, which can cause diabetes. Our expert: Prof Ian Caterson It's a warning that rings harshly in the ear of anyone with a sweet tooth. You're about to tuck into a bag of your favourite lollies when someone shrieks in horror: "Don't eat those! You'll get diabetes!!" But do high-sugar foods really pose this risk? It's true that diabetes is a disease where there's too much glucose — a type of sugar — in your blood. But just because you have high blood sugar doesn't mean eating a lot of sugar is what got you there, says Ian Caterson, Boden Professor of Human Nutrition at the University of Sydney. In fact, the notion there's a direct link between eating sugar and developing diabetes is a myth, Caterson says. However, eating too many sugary foods can lead to weight gain, a key trigger for the most common form of diabetes: type 2. But so can eating too much of many other unhealthy foods, not just those high in sugar. "It is more being overweight — particularly around the waist — that is linked with type 2 diabetes than any particular food you eat," he says. Body fat and insulin Weight gain can lead to diabetes because extra body fat causes chemical changes in your body. "We used to think fat was just a storage tissue but we now know it's more than that," Caterson says. It's an active tissue which produces hormones — chemical messengers that influence processes in the body, he says. In particular, hormones produced by fat influence the activity of another hormone, insulin, which controls the uptake of glucose from your blood. Glucose is the body's main source of energy and it comes from carbohydrates such as potatoes, bread, pasta and rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is rele Continue reading >>

Q: Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Q: Can eating too much sugar cause diabetes? Not in the same smoking-gun way that cigarettes cause cancer, but research shows that sugar may play a part--and it's smart to limit your intake. First and foremost, being overweight does increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and consuming too much sugar (especially when coupled with little to no physical activity) can contribute to weight gain. Excess body fat seems to trigger the release of certain proteins from fat cells that mess with the secretion of insulin (a hormone that metabolizes blood sugar and keeps it at healthy levels), according to a 2009 Cell Metabolism study. This may eventually overwork the pancreas and increase blood sugar, leading to type 2 diabetes. But some emerging research suggests that excess sugar intake can increase diabetes risk regardless of weight. A landmark JAMA study found that women nearly doubled their diabetes risk when they increased the number of sugar-added drinks they consumed from 1 or fewer a week to 1 or more per day over a 4-year period. Rapidly absorbed sugars--like those in colas--may damage the pancreas cells that secrete insulin. In contrast, real-fruit drinks were not associated with increased diabetes risk, perhaps because of the other nutrients absorbed along with the sugar. Bottom line: To be safe, keep your weight at a healthy level; eat plenty of high-fiber foods (like veggies and whole grains), which keep blood sugar and insulin levels steady; and choose water or tea instead of sugary soft drinks whenever possible. --Stephanie Woodard Source: Frank B. Hu, MD, PhD, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health Continue reading >>

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

What is that saying? Everything is good but only in moderation? Well this rings true when it comes to eating sugar with diabetes too. You probably already know that eating a lot of sugar is not great for your body. The problem is that sugar comes in a natural form and in an added form, so sometimes you have no idea that you are consuming it. Also, it is in many foods that you don’t even think to consider. Foods that you think are healthy, such as tomato sauce and protein bars, are packed full of sugar. This article breaks down the facts about eating sugar with diabetes and how you can make the best choices for your body in order to effectively manage your diabetes. How does sugar impact the blood sugar levels? Normally, when you eat something that contains sugar, your pancreas releases insulin. This insulin partners up with the sugar molecules and together they enter into the cells and provide energy to your body. When you have diabetes, your body either isn’t making enough insulin anymore, or your body is resistant to the insulin that you are creating. This prevents the sugar from being used by your cells and it just hangs out in your bloodstream causing high blood sugar levels. Having sugar in your bloodstream can lead to many problems and is dangerous for your health. Sugar, which is also known as carbohydrates or glucose, is found naturally in many different foods such as dairy, fruits, and starchy vegetables. It is also added to many foods like pastas, grains, baked goods, processed foods, and beverages. Since liquids are digested faster, they increase your blood sugar faster than solids do. More about what contains sugar is found later in this article. The myth about sugar and diabetes There are many myths about diabetes in general. One of the biggest ones is Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Headaches?

Does Sugar Cause Headaches?

Sugar is a vital component of your body chemistry. Too much or too little sugar can cause problems, including headaches. This is because sugar has a direct effect on your brain and nervous system. Learning how to maintain a proper level of sugar in your diet may prevent future headaches. If you have persistent headaches related to sugar, you should talk to your doctor. Headaches caused by sugar have a lot to do with your blood glucose level. Glucose gives your body energy by entering your blood stream after you consume sugar. Your body maintains a proper blood sugar level by breaking down glucose with insulin. Fluctuations in your glucose level affect your brain more than any other organ. These rises and drops can result in a headache. The headaches caused by glucose and your brain are also related to hormones activated by sugar levels. How much sugar do you need? It’s increasingly difficult to manage a proper sugar intake. Americans eat far more sugar than they should on average. The American Heart Association recommends women consume no more than six teaspoons of sugar a day and men consume no more than nine teaspoons. This is in sharp contrast to what Americans actually consume, which is 22 teaspoons for adults and 34 teaspoons for children daily. Learn more: America’s deadly sugar addiction has reached epidemic levels » In general, you should maintain a blood sugar level between 70–120 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). This number may change if you have diabetes or another health condition. Always follow your doctor’s recommendations about blood sugar levels. Consuming a lot of sugar or not consuming enough may cause an occasional sugar-related headache. Some conditions, like diabetes, may also make you more likely to experience sugar-related headaches. Tha Continue reading >>

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