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Can Eating Too Much Fruit Cause Insulin Resistance?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Almost 10 percent of Americans have diabetes and that number is growing. Unfortunately, the myths surrounding diabetes are as widespread as the disorder itself. Here we debunk the most common diabetes myths. For the past 50 years, people diagnosed with all forms of diabetes have been advised to eat low-carb diets high in fat and protein, and to avoid eating high-carbohydrate foods like fruits, potatoes, squash, corn, beans, lentils, and whole grains. Despite this popular opinion, more than 85 years of scientific research clearly demonstrates that a low-fat, plant-based whole foods diet is the single most effective dietary approach for managing type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This means that a low-fat diet—not a low-carb diet—has been shown across the board to minimize oral medication and insulin use, stabilize blood glucose, and dramatically reduce long-term disease risk in people with diabetes. Myth #1: You Develop Type 2 Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar Eating sweets is not a direct cause of type 2 diabetes. People develop type 2 diabetes over time by slowly developing a resistance to insulin, the hormone that escorts glucose out of your blood and into tissues like your muscle and liver. I like to think of type 2 diabetes as a very advanced form of insulin resistance in which glucose remains trapped in your blood because your body cannot use insulin properly. In this way, elevated blood glucose is a symptom of diabetes, and NOT the root cause. The real cause of insulin resistance is dietary fat. We discussed it at length in this article. People with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are told to eat foods that are low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein simply because they don’t create an immediate need for insulin. But in the hours and days after a meal hi Continue reading >>

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Insulin is a hormone that helps the body absorb glucose, keeping blood sugar levels in balance. Insulin resistance makes it harder for glucose to be absorbed. This causes problems for muscles, fat, and the liver, as they need glucose (sugar). Over time, insulin resistance can cause high blood sugar levels and damage cells. Insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes. People with insulin resistance are often diagnosed with prediabetes. They may need extra checks to make sure they don't develop diabetes. Diet and other lifestyle choices can increase the risks related to insulin resistance. Making diet changes can reduce insulin insensitivity. This reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes and the health problems that go with it. Contents of this article: Understanding insulin resistance Glucose is a vital source of energy for the body. However, many of the body's cells can't absorb glucose on their own. The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. It joins up with glucose, and travels to the body's cells, where it attaches to insulin receptors. Insulin allows the cells to absorb glucose, making sure that: blood sugar levels remain at a safe level muscle, fat, liver, and other cells are able to get energy Insulin resistance makes cells less sensitive to insulin. This means the body has to produce more insulin to keep blood sugar levels healthy. If the pancreas is unable to keep up with the increased demand for insulin, blood sugar levels go up. When this happens, cells can't use all of the excess glucose in the blood. This leads to type 2 diabetes. Diet tips Following a healthful diet plan, such as the Mediterranean Diet, can improve insulin sensitivity. This diet recommends eating lots of seasonal plant-based foods, having fruit as a dessert, and olive oil as the main Continue reading >>

What About All The Sugar In Fruit?

What About All The Sugar In Fruit?

If the fructose in sugar and high fructose corn syrup has been considered “alcohol without the buzz” in terms of the potential to inflict liver damage, what about the source of natural fructose, fruit? If you compare the effects of a diet restricting fructose from both added sugars and fruit to one just restricting fructose from added sugars, the diet that kept the fruit did better. People lost more weight with the extra fruit present than if all fructose was restricted. Only industrial, not fruit fructose intake, was associated with declining liver function and high blood pressure. Fructose from added sugars was associated with hypertension; fructose from natural fruits is not. If we have people drink a glass of water with three tablespoons of table sugar in it, which is like a can of soda, they get a big spike in blood sugar within the first hour (as you can see in my video If Fructose is Bad, What About Fruit?). Our body freaks out and releases so much insulin we actually overshoot, and by the second hour we’re relatively hypoglycemic, dropping our blood sugar below where it was when we started out. In response, our body dumps fat into our blood stream as if we’re starving, because our blood sugars just dropped so low so suddenly. What if you eat blended berries in addition to the sugar? They have sugars of their own in them; in fact, an additional tablespoon of sugar worth; so, the blood sugar spike should be worse, right? Not only was there no additional blood sugar spike, there was no hypoglycemic dip afterwards. Blood sugar just went up and down without that overshoot and without the surge of fat into the blood. This difference may be attributed to the semisolid consistency of the berry meals, which may have decreased the rate of stomach emptying compared Continue reading >>

Excess Sugar In Liver Causes Insulin Resistance, Say Researchers

Excess Sugar In Liver Causes Insulin Resistance, Say Researchers

Excess sugar in liver causes insulin resistance, say researchers Excess sugar in liver causes insulin resistance, say researchers Molecular map unveils genetic differences between people with and without type 2 diabetes 27 September 2016 The body's inability to use insulin normally during the development of type 2 diabetes is caused by excess sugar in the liver , according to a study claiming to settle a long-standing scientific dispute. A controversial debate about whether sugar lies behind type 2 diabetes exists, with some researchers suggesting it has not contributed to a major rise in the condition across the world. But now a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation is claiming insulin resistance could be caused by a process triggered by excess sugar in the liver. Researchers from Duke University say this is because of a metabolic process involving a molecular factor known as carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein, or ChREBP. The protein is found in several organs and, in the liver, is triggered by excess consumption of a form of sugar called fructose , which is found naturally in fruit and added artificially to a growing number of processed foods and drinks. Fructose initiates a process that causes the liver to keep making glucose and raising blood glucose levels , even as insulin tries to keep glucose production in check, the researchers discovered. Lead researcher Dr Mark Herman, Duke University School of Medicine, said: "There is still significant controversy as to whether sugar consumption is a major contributor to the development of diabetes. "Some investigators contend that commonly consumed amounts of sugar do not contribute to this epidemic. While others are convinced that excessive sugar ingestion is a major cause. This paper Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Myths About Eating Fruit

The Top 10 Myths About Eating Fruit

I’m literally shocked by the amount of confusion around nutrition that exists in the natural movement, especially the confusion surrounding the particular issues with eating fruit. Fruit has universally been recognized as the healthiest food there is, yet it’s also the one natural food that’s vilified the most by many trends of the natural health and raw food movements. This of course started with the dangerous low-carb trend, which would like you to believe that eating slabs of butter on grilled steaks is actually healthier than eating the natural “sugar” in fruit. This unscientific trend has also been picked up by the largest proportion of the raw food theorists, many of which go to the extreme of saying that eating lots of sweet fruit is actually unnatural and unhealthy. Even the popular Hippocrates Health Institute has launched a fear campaign on eating fruit, claiming that fruit eating is responsible for the common health problems experienced by the majority of raw foodists. It would not be an exaggeration to say that a lot of people in the raw food movement are actually scared of eating fruit. Literally. So let’s take a look at the most common statements made about fruit, and bust them once and for all. 1-Eating too much fruit will cause symptoms of blood sugar problems. It’s no secret that a proper, healthy raw food diet contains a lot of fruit. In fact, the quantity of fruit that I consume in one single day probably exceeds the quantity consumed by an average family on a weekly, if not monthly basis. When people look at all that fruit, they’re suddenly afraid that eating so much of it will cause them health problems, the most common being cited is blood sugar issues. I’ve known many people who are absolutely convinced that whenever they eat a l Continue reading >>

Surprising Health Hazards Associated With All-fruit Diet

Surprising Health Hazards Associated With All-fruit Diet

'Canary In Your Trousers': Why Erectile Dysfunction Can Signal Heart Disease Ashton Kutcher recently disclosed he suffered pancreatic problems brought on by following an all-fruit diet adopted in preparation to play the character of Steve Jobs in the upcoming film Jobs. Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 Fruits are loaded with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, which is why eating a small amount of them is fine for healthy people. However, many benefit by restricting their fruit intake due to its high fructose content Research suggests fructose may have a particularly significant impact on pancreatic cancer, as pancreatic cancer cells have been shown to use fructose for cell division, speeding up the growth and spread of the cancer As a general guideline, I recommend limiting your total fructose consumption to 25 grams of fructose per day. If you suffer with any fructose-related health issues, such as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, obesity or cancer, you would be wise to limit your total fructose consumption to 15 grams of fructose per day. This includes fructose from ALL sources, including whole fruit Fruits are loaded with healthy antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, which is why eating them in moderation is fine for healthy people. However, many benefit by restricting their fruit intake. Fructose, a simple sugar found in fruit, is preferentially metabolized to fat in your liver, and eating large amounts has been linked to negative metabolic and endocrine effects. So eating very large amounts or worse, nothing but fruit can logically increase your risk of a number of health conditions, from insulin and leptin resistance to cancer. For example, research has shown that pancreatic tumor cells use fructose , specifically, to divide and Continue reading >>

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Loading your diet with fruit seems like a no-brainer, right? Your body gets a boost from nutritious superstars like fiber , vitamins, and antioxidants, plus juicy berries might even satisfy your sweet tooth . But that doesnt mean maintaining a 24/7 fruit free-for-all is good for your health. Fruit is high in a sugar known as fructose. Even though the sugar is coming from this healthy source, you still have to use moderation, says Brigitte Zeitlin, MPH, RD, CDN, a dietitian at B-Nutritious . If youre panicking because youve been devouring fruit salad to your hearts content, dont worry. Heres what you need to know about how much fruit you should really be eating every day. Why Eating Too Much Fruit Might Impact Your Health Sugar comes in a few different forms: Glucose, fructose and sucrose. Glucose helps keep all your systems chugging along smoothly. Carbohydrates break down into glucose, your bodys main source of fuel, says Beth Warren , MS, RDN, CDN, registered dietitian and author of Living a Real Life with Real Food . Then you have fructose, the only type of sugar found in fruits. Its metabolized in the liver, as opposed to in the blood stream. Sucrose, more commonly known as table sugar, is simply a combination of both glucose and fructose. RELATED: The Bitter Truth About Sugar and Its Effects on Our Health High blood sugar, which is caused by too much glucose in your blood, can lead to diabetes. Refined carbohydrates, like white rice or white-flour baked goods, are common culprits leading to high blood sugar. In addition to their sugar content, they lack the fiber that prevents glucose spikes, wreaking havoc on your blood sugar levels. Too much sugar in the blood stream at once leads to fat storage and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, says Zeitli Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Trigger Gestational Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Trigger Gestational Diabetes?

Women who eat large amounts of fruit during pregnancy may have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. A new study found that women who ate lots of fruit during their second trimester were four times more likely to develop the disease. The raised risk was particularly associated with fruits high on the glycaemic index. However, those who ate more fruit also had a higher total intake of carbohydrates. This may be the real culprit (see our analysis below). The study, published in Nature, aimed to investigate the association between fruit consumption during the second trimester and the occurrence of gestational diabetes. It tracked the diets of 772 women for more than a year. Of the 772 participants, 169 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes during the study period. An increased likelihood of gestational diabetes was particularly associated with consumption of tropical and citrus fruits, along with fruits high on the glycaemic index, which include bananas, pineapple, apricots, kiwis, watermelon, dates and raisins. Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition during pregnancy but it raises the risk of type-2 diabetes in later life. Instant analysis This was a prospective cohort study evaluating the association of fruit consumption and the occurrence of gestational diabetes. This study design is insufficient on its own in establishing causality, but establishes correlation. Gestational diabetes is diabetes diagnosed in pregnancy usually between 24 to 28 weeks of gestation, when insulin resistance is at its highest, which was not evident before pregnancy and doesn’t persist longer than six weeks after childbirth. During the study period, 1,126 women were deemed eligible for inclusion, of which the data of 772 women was subsequently analysed. The patients were divided int Continue reading >>

Is Too Much Fruit Bad?

Is Too Much Fruit Bad?

Fruit or no fruit? the e3 Energy Evolved team weighs in. For years the authorities have told us that we should be consuming a lot of fruits and vegetables . While eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables is better than one consisting of processed, refined and fast foods, as fruits are packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, there are a number of potential health hazards associated with too much fruit consumption. Instead, we should be eating a lot of vegetables and a moderate fruit intake . Fructose is a simple sugar found in fruit, and is metabolized into fat by the liver. Diets high in fruits have been linked to metabolic and endocrine issues . Fructose has shown to increase the risks of high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, heart disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, and kidney disease, as well as feed cancer cells. Fructose is absorbed differently by the body than other sugars like glucose. Glucose increases insulin production, allowing the sugar in the blood to be transported into cells, providing them with energy. Glucose also regulates appetite and fat storage by increasing leptin production, and decreases production of ghrelin, which helps regulate food intake. Fructose, however, does not stimulate insulin or leptin production the same way and does not suppress ghrelin. Because sugars and refined foods elevate blood sugar levels, they are linked to insulin resistance. Even though fructose doesnt affect blood sugar levels in the same manner and increase insulin production like glucose or sucrose, diets high in fructose are also linked to insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas which, as mentioned earlier, acts as a transport mechanism allowing glucose and nutrients to be pumped into the c Continue reading >>

Eating Too Much Fruit?

Eating Too Much Fruit?

Yes, it can. Mother Nature clearly intended creatures of the earth to eat fruit. Fruit is delicious and appealing to animals so that they can help plants spread their seeds. Fruit offers quick energy in the form of sugar, as well as vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidant pigments, and other phytocompounds that reduce risks of disease. The main problem with fruit these days is that so little of it available to us is any good. The varieties in commercial production are much less nutritious than ancestral ones. Much fruit is picked before it is ripe, which is favorable to shippers and distributors but not to consumers. Then there is the problem of agrichemical residues. I try to get organic fruit. If I can’t, I peel fruit when possible or wash it in a weak soap-and-water solution to remove what’s on the surface. However, with some crops, such as strawberries, systemic pesticides are used that permeate the flesh of the fruit and cannot be washed off. If you’re trying to lose weight, eating a lot of fruit can sabotage your efforts. While calorie counts are modest in many types of fresh fruit, they can skyrocket if you’re sipping a lot of fruit juice, making smoothies (which can add up to 300 calories or more) or consuming a lot of dried fruits, which are a source of concentrated sugar. People who eat a lot of fruit are often health and weight-conscious but can’t understand why they’re not losing pounds. Eating too much fruit can also raise your serum triglycerides, which can increase cardiovascular risk. The high glycemic load of some forms of fruit can provoke insulin resistance and worsen metabolic syndrome. People with this problem are advised to eat only whole fruits and limit servings of dried fruits to one-quarter cup per day. If you eat canned fruits, choo Continue reading >>

Does Fruit Cause Insulin To Go Up?

Does Fruit Cause Insulin To Go Up?

Insulin is produced by your pancreas and is required to keep your blood sugar levels under control. However, consistently elevated insulin levels are associated with a higher risk of developing chronic diseases, such as certain types of cancer and type 2 diabetes, according to a scientific paper published in 2003 in "Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology." The carbohydrate content of the foods you eat is the main factor determining how your insulin levels will respond. Fruits contain carbohydrates and can raise your insulin levels. Carbohydrate Content Although the carbohydrates found in fruits are considered healthier because they are packed along with loads of fiber and essential nutrients, all carbohydrates, including those from fruits, are broken down into sugars. The sugar obtained from the digestion of fruits can elevate your blood sugar levels, which in turn push your pancreas to produce insulin. The more carbohydrates you eat at once, the higher your insulin levels are likely to increase. For example, your insulin levels will increase more after having a large banana and orange juice compared to after eating three grapes. Having other carbohydrates at the same time, such as a muffin, a slice of bread or oatmeal, can also further increase your insulin levels. Net Carbs If you want to compare different servings of fruits to determine which will raise your insulin levels the most, you will need to calculate their net carb content. The amount of total carbohydrates found in a serving of fruit include the natural sugars, starches and fiber. Fruits contain varying amounts of fiber that are counted as carbohydrates but cannot be broken down into sugar. Calculating the net carbs by subtracting the fiber from the total carbs gives you a better idea of the insulin-raisi Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

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