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Can Ear Infection Cause High Blood Sugar

Can An Ear Acke Cause My Sugar Levels To Go Up If I'm A Diabetic??

Can An Ear Acke Cause My Sugar Levels To Go Up If I'm A Diabetic??

Can an ear acke cause my sugar levels to go up if I'm a diabetic?? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: I thought it might be better to quote a doctor 2007 Copyright Harvard Health Publications Can a viral or bacterial infection cause an elevated blood glucose level in a diabetic? For a person who has diabetes, it is very common for a viral or bacterial infection to result in elevated blood glucose levels. In fact, elevated sugar levels are sometimes the first clue that an infection has developed. During an infection, your body chemistry changes as your immune system becomes active. Your body produces hormones (cortisol and others) that interfere with your usual insulin production. These hormones can also blunt the effect insulin has in your body, making you more resistant to insulin than you already are. Occasionally, blood sugar levels can be dangerously high in the setting of infection. It is important for a person with diabetes to drink plenty of fluids during any infection, and to see a doctor without delay if an infection has developed. When the infection is cleared, blood sugar returns to usual levels. Mary Pickett, M.D., is a lecturer for Harvard Medical School and an assistant professor of medicine at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, OR. At OHSU, she practices general internal medicine and teaches medical residents and students. Absolutely. My husband is an insulin dependent diabetic. He stopped drinking sugar free (aspertane sweetened) drinks because of concern about other effects of aspertane and immediately his insulin need dropped by 40-50% . He has switched to sugar sweetened drinks so that seemed really strange to me. His doctor says that is not uncommon, In The Good Calorie Diet Dr Phillip Litetz explains why aspertan Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Symptoms

Hyperglycemia Symptoms

The basic defect in all patients with diabetes is the decreased ability of insulin to induce cells of the body to remove glucose (sugar) molecules from the blood. Whether this decreased insulin activity is due to a decreased amount of insulin produced (type 1 diabetes), or from the insensitivity of the cells to a normal amount of insulin (type 2 diabetes), the results are the same: blood glucose levels which are too high. This is termed "hyperglycemia" which means "high glucose in the blood." hyper = high, glyc = glucose, and emia = of the blood. What happens when you have hyperglycemia? Common Symptoms of Hyperglycemia The Classic Symptoms Polyphagia (frequently hungry) Polyuria (frequently urinating) Polydipsia (frequently thirsty) Other Symptoms Might Include Blurred vision Fatigue Weight loss Poor wound healing (cuts, scrapes, etc.) Dry mouth Dry or itchy skin Impotence (male) Recurrent infections such as vaginal yeast infections, groin rash, or external ear infections (swimmers ear) It is important to remember that not everyone with diabetes will have all these symptoms. In fact, many people with type 2 diabetes may not have any of them. Who can develop hyperglycemia? To learn about other diabetes complications and how to prevent them, see our type 1 diabetes complications and type 2 diabetes complications articles. The classic symptom of being hungry frequently stems from the fact that a person with diabetes cannot utilize glucose well as an energy source within cells. The glucose is circulating in the blood, but the cells can't absorb it to use it as a fuel. The excess blood sugar molecules also "spill" into the urine, meaning that as the blood filters through the kidneys, some of the sugar comes out of the blood and is not reabsorbed. The extra sugar which is no Continue reading >>

Infection In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Infection In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Infection in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Author: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Diabetes increases susceptibility to various types of infections. The most common sites of infection in diabetic patients are the skin and urinary tract. Malignant otitis externa and rhinocerebral mucormycosis are 2 head-and-neck infections seen almost exclusively in patients with diabetes. Malignant or necrotizing otitis externa principally occurs in diabetic patients older than 35 years and is almost always due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. [ 1 ] Infection starts in the external auditory canal and spreads to adjacent soft tissue, cartilage, and bone. Patients typically present with severe ear pain and otorrhea. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis collectively refers to infections caused by various ubiquitous molds. [ 2 ] Invasive disease occurs in patients with poorly controlled diabetes, especially those with diabetic ketoacidosis. Organisms colonize the nose and paranasal sinuses, spreading to adjacent tissues by invading blood vessels and causing soft tissue necrosis and bony erosion. Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and pyuria, cystitis, and, more important, serious upper urinary tract infection . [ 3 , 4 ] Intrarenal bacterial infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with diabetes who presents with flank or abdominal pain. Pyelonephritis makes control of diabetes more difficult by causing insulin resistance; in addition, nausea may limit the patient's ability to maintain normal hydration. Treatment of pyelonephritis does not differ for patients with diabetes, but a lower threshold for hospital admission is appropriate. Sensory neuropathy, atherosclerotic vascular disease, Continue reading >>

The Ears Have It

The Ears Have It

All About Hearing Loss Many people think that having hearing loss is like listening to a radio set to a low volume — the sound is simply not as loud. Although it is true that certain kinds of hearing loss can make sounds noticeably softer and more difficult to hear, there are in fact different types of hearing loss that can have vastly different effects on how sounds are heard and understood. The different types of hearing loss tend to have different causes, and it appears that having diabetes can contribute to the development of certain types of hearing loss. The mechanics of hearing Hearing is a process in which the ear is only the beginning of the story. The chain of events starts when sound enters the ear canal and causes the eardrum to vibrate. The vibrations set in motion the three tiny bones that form a chain in the middle ear space that connects the eardrum to the cochlea — a hollow structure that is coiled in the shape of a snail’s shell, containing three tubes filled with fluid. The last bone in the middle ear chain is connected to a membrane covering a small opening called the oval window at one end of the cochlea, and the vibrations of this membrane cause waves in the fluids inside the cochlea. This, in turn, causes movement of microscopic structures called hair cells, which are present in one of the tubes in the cochlea. The movement of these tiny hair cells creates an electrical signal that is sent to the hearing nerve, which connects the cochlea to the brain stem. The electrical signal travels up the brain stem and through a system of nerve pathways before arriving at specialized auditory centers of the brain where the message is finally processed. Amazingly, this entire chain of events takes only tiny fractions of a second. (See “A Look Inside th Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

Infection, Stress And Raised Fasting Blood Glucose

Infection, Stress And Raised Fasting Blood Glucose

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Infection, stress and raised fasting blood glucose I have had a series of infections overt the last 2 months including noro virus , flu , tonsillitis with an ear infection I have also had a colonoscopy which thank fully was fine but caused a lot of stress. A blood test prior to my colonoscopy and just after the noro virus showed my BG to be hgher than normal . I was invited to have a Fasting BG test. At that test I was recovering fom the flu and was developing a throat infection. The test has come back as 6.7 and I have been asked to return for a second fasting BG test. I still have a throat infection and have been testing myself on my husbands BG monitor [he's a type 1 diabetic] After fasting I have had readings of 7.1 and 7.2 Can these repeated infections and stress raise BG to these levels, or am i going to be diagnosed as diabetic I am also "prediabetic". My fasting blood sugars were in tthe so-called 'normal' range, when tested, but my post prandial readings are too high for a non-diabetic. Last year I went though three months if bronchitis which I could not fight off, on top of which I developed a throat infection and then a few weeks after came down with a cold, at the same time I had developed a secondary bronchial infection. I felt so bizarre at times, as if I had been poisoned. Knowing what I know now, it was probably raised BG. Due to having a 'normal' fasting result, my (pre)diabetes was missed. The inability to fight off infection is a characteristic of diabetes, and I'd never known anything like it. This week I will be seeing the GP to make some progress on arranging further tests, but in the meantime I am testing at home. I have been at Continue reading >>

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

Upswing: Caffeine Your blood sugar can rise after you have coffee -- even black coffee with no calories -- thanks to the caffeine. The same goes for black tea, green tea, and energy drinks. Each person with diabetes reacts to foods and drinks differently, so it's best to keep track of your own responses. Ironically, other compounds in coffee may help prevent type 2 diabetes in healthy people. Many of these will raise your blood sugar levels. Why? They can still have plenty of carbs from starches. Check the total carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts label before you dig in. You should also pay attention to sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol. They add sweetness with fewer carbs than sugar (sucrose), but they may still have enough to boost your levels. One study found that people with type 2 diabetes who switched to a vegan (or all vegetable-based) diet had better blood sugar control and needed less insulin. A boost in fiber from whole grains and beans might play a role, by slowing down the digestion of carbs. But scientists need more research to know if going vegan really helps diabetes. Talk to your doctor before you make major diet changes. Blood sugar can dip dangerously low during shut-eye for some people with diabetes, especially if they take insulin. It's best to check your levels at bedtime and when you wake up. A snack before bed may help. For some people, blood sugar can rise in the morning -- even before breakfast -- due to changes in hormones or a drop in insulin. Regular testing is important. One option is a continuous blood glucose monitor, which can alert you to highs and lows. Physical activity is a great health booster for everyone. But people with diabetes should tailor it to what they need. When you work out hard enough to sweat and raise your h Continue reading >>

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Even if you do not have diabetes, you can experience drops and spikes in blood sugar levels for many reasons. If your blood sugar level gets too high or too low, you might develop many symptoms and/or health problems. Stress, poor diet, illness and infections can all cause your blood sugar level to change, and if you notice the warning signs, it is important to talk to your physician about the best treatment approach. Video of the Day After a meal, your body breaks food down into glucose either for immediate use, or else it's stored for later use. The hormone insulin, as well as other chemicals, regulate how much glucose is in your system. If the level of glucose in your bloodstream gets too high, many complications can result. A general goal for everyone is to keep your blood sugar levels no higher than 100 mg/dL, says MedlinePlus. A blood sugar level higher than this can indicate not just diabetes, but also some forms of cancer, Cushing syndrome, an imbalance of various hormones, thyroid disorders or it might be the body's reaction to stress, trauma or an infection. Infections and Blood Glucose Levels When your body is under mental or physical stress, such as when fighting off an infection, hormones such as cortisol are released to help your body cope. The hormones that are released to fight off the infection might have the side effect of raising your blood sugar levels, so your body has the energy it needs to get better. This effect can happen to both diabetics and nondiabetics. If you have an infection and are concerned about your blood sugar levels, it is important to know the warning signs of nondiabetic hyperglycemia, which are the same symptoms that occur in diabetics: hunger, sweating, shakiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, thirst, sleepiness, confusion, diffic Continue reading >>

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

Hearing loss is a very common condition that usually develops gradually with age or as a result of repeated exposure to loud noise. There are a number of other factors which can cause loss of hearing, including illness and physical trauma. Some researchers believe the presence of diabetes could contribute to hearing lossor deafness. In fact, hearing loss has been shown to be twice as common in adults with diabetes compared to those without the disease. The terms hearing loss, hearing impairment and deafness refers to apartial or total inability tohear. Cases of impaired hearing are usually categorised by their type, their severity (mild, moderate, severe, or profound deafness are the 4 different levels of hearing loss), and the age of onset (before or after a person can recognise and understand language). In the UK, approximately 1 in 6 people, or 10 million Britons, suffer from apartial or total inability tohear. Hearing loss develops when sound signals are unable to reach the brain. Damage tothe auditory nerve - the sensitive hair cells inside the cochlea (part of the inner ear), which transmit the impulses from the cochlea to the hearing centre in the brain. This is an age-related and permanent form of hearing loss known assensorineural hearing loss. Blockages or build-up of fluid - earwax, ear infections, a perforated ear drum or damage to the hearing bones can all prevent sounds from passing from your outer ear to your inner ear. This is known as conductive hearing impairment, and is often a temporary problem. In somecases, both of these problems can occur and/or combine to cause what is known as mixed hearing loss. Factors that can lead to sensorineural, conductive, or mixed hearing loss, in addition to aging, include: Prolonged exposure to loud noises or sounds Continue reading >>

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hearing Loss

Diabetes And Hearing Loss

A Surprising Complication Ed Weinsberg wasn’t surprised when he developed burning sensations in his feet in 2006. His health care provider had told him he might experience this sign of peripheral neuropathy, a side effect of his recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Medication helped reduce the sensations. But a few years ago, Ed, 62, a former rabbi and author living in Sarasota, Florida, began to experience frustrating problems with his hearing. “Every sentence began with, ‘What did you say?’ ” he says. “My ear, nose, and throat doctor wasn’t sure what was behind it.” By then Ed had already lost 50 percent of his hearing in his left ear. “But I suspected there might be a connection with my diabetes. I know it reduces blood flow to other parts of the body.” Ed was onto something. Research shows that people with uncontrolled type 1 or type 2 diabetes are twice as likely as others to experience hearing loss. In a large study of people ages 20–69, researchers from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases found a strong association between diabetes and hearing problems, emerging as early as age 30. A recent study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit reached much the same conclusion. Researchers found that in women younger than 60, hearing was worse among those with type 1 or type 2 diabetes compared to women without diabetes, according to study coauthor Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., chair of otolaryngology at the hospital. And women ages 60–75 with poorly controlled diabetes had significantly worse hearing than those whose diabetes was considered well-controlled. “When you think about complications of diabetes, this is not what you think about,” says Joanne Rinker, RD, CDE, with the North Carolina Diabetes Prevention and Cont Continue reading >>

6 Things Your Ears Are Trying To Tell You

6 Things Your Ears Are Trying To Tell You

Prevention may earn money from the links on this page. Why trust us? 6 Things Your Ears Are Trying To Tell You Have you ever taken a minute to appreciate your ears? You should. That's because they do a lot more than hear. (Other major tasks: regulating balance and sending info about your head position to your brain.) In fact, everything about your earsfrom the way they look to the wax they produce can potentially provide clues about the state of your general health. Here, 6 things your ears may be trying to tell you. (Heal your whole body with Rodale's 12-day liver detox for total body health !) You have diabetesor are at higher risk for developing it. Hearing loss is the third most common health problem in the US, but it can also be a symptom of various systemic diseases, like diabetes. According to a 2008 study funded by the National Institutes of Health, hearing loss is twice as common in diabetics versus those who don't have the disease. Furthermore, prediabetic adults (those with above-normal blood glucose levels) had a 30% higher rate of hearing loss than people with normal blood sugar levels. "We don't know exactly what the link is between hearing loss and diabetes, but it probably has to do with blood supply to the inner ear," which can be compromised in diabetics, says Seth Schwartz, MD, director of the Listen for Life Center at Virginia Mason in Seattle. What's more, metabolic changes that occur in diabetics "can be toxic to the inner ear, particularly when the disease isn't well managed," he adds. The upshot: Ear infections are more common, and can be more severe, in diabetes patients. Next time you pass a mirror, check out your earlobes. Are they smooth and unwrinkled? Carry on. If you spot a diagonal crease, however, it might be worth mentioning to your do Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Can Pain In My Ear Be Worsened With My Diabetes?

Can Pain In My Ear Be Worsened With My Diabetes?

Lawanna asked... I have Type 2 Diabetes, and I have pain in my ear. I am wondering if having diabetes can make this pain be more harmful to me than if not? Expert Answers Of course, ear pain should be evaluated by a doctor, whether or not you have diabetes. There are many possible causes of ear pain such as an ear infection, trauma to the ear, a foreign body in the ear, or a condition known as swimmer's ear, an infection of the outer ear and ear canal, characterized by pain, itchiness, and a feeling of stuffiness in the ear. Diabetes won't make ear pain more harmful, but not getting your ear evaluated in a timely manner could be harmful. Diabetes is a disease that can affect many different parts of the body, including the ear. Patients with diabetes are particularly prone to infections, including infections of the ear. Pain and swelling in the ear could indicate such an infection, which can be treated with ear drops and/or antibiotics. In addition, people with diabetes may have problems with hearing loss. If you are also experiencing hearing loss, you should have your hearing tested when you visit your doctor. Read this blog post to learn more about diabetes and hearing loss. Community Answers there seems to be adisaggrement amongst MD 's with your respone I have an external Ear infection now 3/22/11. I had to go to the E.R. My EAR on the out side was bothering me when I woke up,it was really red and swollen.I waited 1 day and then had to go it keep me awake. Kept hurting . Dr. Said that I could be bad for my Cartilage if it got into it. Need to watch out when you have Diabeties.I have Diabetes #2.I have POLYPERREFIAL SYMIMOTOR NUEROPOTHY AND MY FEET BOTHER ME ON A DAILY 24 HR. BASIS SEE DR.FOR PAIN MEDS.ITS HARD FOR ME TO WALK AND I USE A CANE. I AM ONLY 58 AND HAVE HA Continue reading >>

Malignant Otitis Externa

Malignant Otitis Externa

Otitis externa is a common ear infection also known as swimmer’s ear. It develops in the ear canal leading to the eardrum. In some cases, otitis externa can spread to surrounding tissue, including the bones of the jaw and face. This infection is known as malignant otitis externa. Although otitis externa is also known as swimmer’s ear, malignant otitis externa isn’t due to water remaining in the ear canal. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus often cause malignant otitis externa. Over 90 percent of people who develop malignant otitis externa have diabetes. Malignant otitis externa is an aggressive infection rather than a malignancy, or cancer. An alternative name for malignant otitis externa is necrotizing external otitis. If it’s not treated malignant otitis externa can be life-threatening. Malignant otitis externa isn’t commonly a complication of swimmer’s ear. Typically, the condition occurs when you have other health problems or you’re receiving treatment that can weaken your immune system. These can include: Read more: Everything you need to know about HIV and AIDS » If you have a compromised immune system and aggressive bacteria enter your ear canal, your body will have difficulty warding off infection. If the bacteria cause an infection, the infection can damage the tissue of your ear canal and the bones at the base of your skull. If it’s left untreated, the infection can spread to your brain, cranial nerves, and other parts of your body. The symptoms of malignant otitis externa are easily recognizable. They can include: persistent and foul-smelling yellow or green drainage from the ear ear pain that gets worse when moving the head swollen and red skin around the ear If any of these symptoms develop, contact your docto Continue reading >>

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