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Can Drugs Affect Diabetes?

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Medications That Increase Blood Glucose (sugar) Or Cause Diabetes

Medications That Increase Blood Glucose (sugar) Or Cause Diabetes

Introduction There are many types of medications that increase blood glucose (sugar), causing high blood glucose (hyperglycemia). Many of these medications worsen diabetes or increase the risk of diabetes. It is important to know which medications can increase blood glucose so that diabetic patients can use alternative agents or monitor their glucose levels and use appropriate methods to maintain control. Here are 9 types of medications that increase blood glucose. Medications that Increase Blood Glucose (Sugar) 1. Glucocorticoids (hydrocortisone, prednisone, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, triamcinolone, dexamethasone, fludrocortisone) Glucocorticoids are steroids and they affect how the body uses glucose. They affect the immune system and they are used for treatment of inflammatory, allergic, and immunologic conditions. Glucocorticoids are usually the most common cause of drug-induced hyperglycemia. Glucocorticoids cause an increase in blood glucose in various ways such as increased production of glucose in the liver, increased insulin resistance, and increased production of receptors (PPAR-gamma receptors) that regulate glucose uptake and conversion in the body. Patients that are treated with glucocorticoids should have their blood glucose monitored regularly. Inhaled steroids or creams are less likely to affect blood glucose levels. 2. Antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, chlorpromazine, perphenazine, iloperidone, paliperidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone) Antipsychotics are used for treatment of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and borderline personality disorder. Antipsychotic medications are associated with weight gain, obesity, and increase in triglycerides which are risk factors for developmen Continue reading >>

Recreational Drugs Can Have Serious Consequences For Diabetics

Recreational Drugs Can Have Serious Consequences For Diabetics

Recreational drug use can seriously interfere with proper diabetes care and pose a serious threat to your health. Here are some of the ways in which certain drugs can be detrimental to your wellbeing, especially if you have diabetes. 1. Cocaine Cocaine is a highly addictive drug derived from the leaves of the coca plant. According to Diabetes.co.uk, it is classified as illegal and very harmful. Since this drug causes users not to feel hunger or exhaustion, it can be particularly dangerous for diabetics. Without proper rest and nourishment, you can greatly increase your risk of hypoglycemia. You may also experience symptoms of this low blood sugar disorder and mistake them for drug effects, which can be very dangerous. While on the drug, it is easy to forget to use insulin, which can cause dangerously high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). 2. Ecstasy Ecstasy is an illegal chemical drug that typically comes in a tablet form. Like cocaine, this drug can suppress appetite, a dangerous side effect for diabetics who need to keep a regular meal schedule. It also gives the user a burst of energy, which usually causes them to stay up for hours and get very little sleep. Both of these can lead to hypoglycemia, notes Diabetes Health. People on this drug often experience dehydration as well, which can be very dangerous for diabetics, since they are already more prone to this. 3. LSD This hallucinogenic drug is created from fungus and chemicals. Both illegal and dangerous, LSD causes the user to go on "trips" or experience hallucinations, things that are not really happening. LSD often distorts time and space for users. This is dangerous for diabetics who need to use insulin regularly - they will often forget or not realize how much time has passed. As with some other illegal drug Continue reading >>

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

One of the main goals of any diabetes control regimen is keeping blood glucose levels in the near-normal range. The cornerstones of most plans to achieve that goal include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and taking insulin or other medicines as necessary. However, it’s not uncommon for people with diabetes to have other medical conditions that also require taking medicines, and sometimes these drugs can interfere with efforts to control blood glucose. A few medicines, including some commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and heart disease, have even been implicated as the cause of some cases of diabetes. This article lists some of the medicines that can worsen blood glucose control, the reasons they have that effect, the usual magnitude of the blood glucose changes, as well as the pros and cons of using these drugs in people who have diabetes. Where the problems occur To understand how various medicines can worsen blood glucose control, it helps to understand how insulin, the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose, works in the body. Insulin is released from the beta cells of the pancreas in response to rising levels of glucose in the bloodstream, rising levels of a hormone called GLP-1 (which is released from the intestines in response to glucose), and signals from the nerve connections to the pancreas. The secretion of insulin occurs in two phases: a rapid first phase and a delayed second phase. Both of these phases are dependent on levels of potassium and calcium in the pancreas. Insulin acts on three major organs: the liver, the muscles, and fat tissue. In the liver, insulin enhances the uptake of glucose and prevents the liver from forming new glucose, which it normally does to maintain fasting glucose levels. In muscle and f Continue reading >>

Recreational Drugs And Diabetes

Recreational Drugs And Diabetes

Tweet Recreational drugs are mind-altering chemical substances that are used for non-medicinal, leisure purposes (i.e. taking a substance for the sole purpose of getting 'high'). These are split into 3 main categories: Hallucinogenics - these affect the mind and what you see, feel or hear Downers - these affect thought, heart rate and breathing Uppers - which make the body faster in terms of speech, reaction and heart rate Recreational drugs are also known as psychoactive drugs, due to their effects on one's consciousness, cognition, mood and behaviour. This may lead to addiction or substance abuse which, in turn, can have a detrimental effect on the user’s physical and mental health. However, the consequences of recreational drug use can be a lot more severe for people whose health is already affected by conditions such as diabetes. What types of recreational drugs are there? There are many types of recreational drugs. Some people are often surprised to realise that caffeine is a drug. The most commonly used drugs are: Alcohol Alkyl Nitrite (Poppers) Amphetamines (Speed) Anabolic steroids Caffeine - found in tea and coffee Cannabis (or marijuana) Cocaine Crack Ecstasy Glue and solvents Heroin (opium) Methamphetamine Tobacco (Nicotine) What effects do these drugs have? Recreational drugs affect both the mind and body, causing a wide range of feelings and emotions. Some such as amphetamines and ecstasy are stimulants which act on the central nervous system, causing an increase in heart rate and a rush of blood through the heart and brain. Users often report increased confidence and energy levels combined with a physiological arousal, but as the body's energy levels reduce they become prone to feelings of: Anxiety Irritability Restlessness Dizziness The mental and physi Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Diabetes

Drug-induced Diabetes

Many therapeutic agents can predispose to or precipitate diabetes, especially when pre-existing risk factors are present, and these may cause glucose control to deteriorate if administered to those with existing diabetes. They may act by increasing insulin resistance, by affecting the secretion of insulin, or both. For convenience, these agents may be subdivided into widely used medications that are weakly diabetogenic, and drugs used for special indications that are more strongly diabetogenic. Examples of the former include antihypertensive agents and statins, and examples of the latter include steroids, antipsychotics and a range of immunosuppressive agents. There are also a number of known beta cell poisons including the insecticide Vacor, alloxan and streptozotocin. Introduction A wide range of therapeutic agents may affect glucose tolerance, and the list of known or suspected drugs is lengthy. This entry summarizes evidence concerning the agents most frequently implicated. Widely used medications A number of drugs used to reduce cardiovascular risk also predispose to the development of diabetes. These include the thiazide diuretics, beta-blockers and statins. It should however be appreciated that these are commonly offered to individuals who are at increased risk of diabetes by virtue of risk factors such as obesity and hypertension, and that risk association does not necessarily mean causation. Thiazides: Thiazide diuretics revolutionized the treatment of hypertension in the 1960s, but were soon noted to increase the risk of diabetes[1]. Subsequent experience showed that that this risk is greatly reduced by low-dose therapy, whose benefits therefore outweigh its risks. The thiazides have a weak inhibitory effect upon release of insulin from the beta cell. This eff Continue reading >>

Non-diabetes Drugs And Supplements That Affect Glucose Levels

Non-diabetes Drugs And Supplements That Affect Glucose Levels

A certified diabetes educator provides a list, and what to do to prevent a blood sugar swing caused by a new medication. The main medicine people with Type 1 diabetes take on a daily basis is insulin, but did you know that other non-diabetes-related medications can affect your blood sugar, too? This side effect can create havoc on your glucose management if you don’t adjust your insulin levels to accommodate it. sponsor Here’s a list of medications to consider: Some common medications that can increase glucose levels: Valium and Ativan (benzodiazepines) Thiazide diuretics, which are taken as blood pressure medicine The steroids cortisone, prednisone, and hydrocortisone Birth control pills Progesterone Catecholamines, which include the EpiPen and asthma inhalers Decongestants that contain pseudoephedrine Niacin Zyprexa and many other antipsychotic medications Some common medications or supplements that can cause low glucose levels include: Aspirin Asian ginseng Aloe Magnesium salicylate Quinine (This is a partial list. Diabetes in Control has created a PDF of a more complete list, which you can find by clicking here.) sponsor Each time you get a prescription for a new medication, try to read the info that comes with the medication or ask the pharmacist if they know about any effects the medicine might have on blood sugar levels. If you start to take any vitamins or herbal supplements, you should also mention these to your doctor so they can check if there are interactions. If you’ll be using a medicine long-term, talk to your doctor about its effect on glucose levels and if there is an alternative that could be taken that has no effect. If not, work on a plan with your diabetes care team to evaluate the effect and, if necessary, come up with a way to counter it. If Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Substance Abuse

Diabetes And Substance Abuse

Managing a diabetes problem means paying close attention to each and every molecule of food and drink that enters the body. Strict control like this can keep blood sugar levels in check, and sometimes a proper diet can reduce a persons need for diabetes medications. Unfortunately, some people add drugs or alcohol into their dietary mix, and when they do, control of the disease could become elusive. Anyone could choose to amend the bodys chemistry with drugs and alcohol. But people with diabetes might be prone to abusing substances, simply because of the pressures they face due to the day-in-day-out pressures of controlling a chronic condition. For example, young people with type1 diabetes grow up under a cloud of restrictions. They cant eat birthday cake, gorge on Halloween candy or run around barefoot in the springtime. They might feel just different than their peers, and they might long for the day in which they can shed all of their restrictions and live a life thats free. When these young people hit adolescence, they might choose to rebel against their diagnosis, dabbling in foods they shouldnt eat and skipping medication doses just to see what might happen. According to an article in Diabetic Medicine , the poorest level of glycemic control is seen in people who are between the ages of 16 to 18, and unfortunately, this is the point at which many young people are also tempted to abuse drugs. The consequences of poor diet control and drug use can be severe, as this article suggests that drug use is associated with death due to diabetes events in this age group. When adulthood arrives, people with diabetes might be slightly more likely to adhere to a strict diet and medication routine. However, people with diabetes might also feel as though they can control their dia Continue reading >>

Drugs Know The Score

Drugs Know The Score

Learning when you are going to have a hypo, recognising the warning signs and knowing what your limits are could save your life, however if you decide to experiment with drugs this becomes difficult to do. You may already know the some of the risks with drugs and how that can affect your health and that there are legal and illegal drugs but you may not be aware of how they can affect you if you have diabetes. Know the facts! Different drugs affect people in different ways. It depends on how your body handles it, how much you have and what you are using. Most recreational drugs can be divided into 3 main groups depending on the effect they have on the body. The information below tells you how different drugs affect your diabetes and this is in addition to the usual effects of the specified drug. 1. Uppers (Stimulants) Includes drugs such as speed, ecstasy, cocaine and nicotine in cigarettes. They speed up your heart rate, affect the way you think and even how you speak. Cigarettes - how they will affect your diabetes The nicotine in cigarettes is a stimulant, smoking will make your heart beat faster and work harder, this can give you problems later on in life. With diabetes you need to take extra care of your heart and circulation. Remember that any drug that changes your rate of metabolism could also affect your blood glucose levels. Regular blood testing of your glucose is important to keep you in control. Speed - How It Will Affect Your Diabetes Borrowed sugar - Although dealers sometimes mix speed with glucose, its not enough to give you the extra energy you need to get through the night - that comes from your own blood glucose reserves. The more active you are, the more vulnerable you are to a hypo. Day and Night, because you won’t feel like eating or sleeping, yo Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Drug Addiction

The Effects Of Diabetes On Drug Addiction

Addiction is always a dangerous disease, but it can be especially life-threatening for diabetics. Wild fluctuations in blood sugar can increase drug cravings and make long-term recovery all but impossible. Frequent drug abuse can also worsen the toll which diabetes already takes on people’s bodies. In order for diabetics to get healthy and stay sober, they need to understand the complex and dangerous relationship between their conditions. Understanding Diabetes Diabetes is a metabolic condition characterized by chronically high blood sugar levels. This phenomenon is caused by a malfunctioning in the body’s production and utilization of insulin – a hormone which normally diverts glucose from the blood into the cells of organs and muscle tissue. Type 1 diabetics are born with pancreases which don’t produce any insulin at all. On the other hand, type 2 diabetics develop their conditions later in life due to insulin insensitivity. Usually through poor diets, they overload their bodies’ insulin receptors, causing permanent damage to their abilities to use this crucial hormone. Most doctors believe this to be the reason why type 2 diabetics tend to be overweight or obese. Blood Sugar and Drug Cravings Although diabetes is a disease of high blood sugar, diabetics who treat their conditions often experience abnormally low levels. Since they either can’t produce insulin or can’t use it efficiently, they usually inject large amounts of it after meals. These injections can lead to the rapid uptake of glucose in their bodies, leaving them with extremely low concentrations of blood sugar – a phenomenon called hypoglycemia. Low blood sugar tends to induce hunger in healthy people, but the body’s feedback mechanisms for food and drug cravings are intertwined. Most ad Continue reading >>

You Might Like

You Might Like

Some medicines for conditions other than diabetes can raise your blood sugar level. This is a concern when you have diabetes. Make sure every doctor you see knows about all of the medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements you take. This means anything you take with or without a prescription. you might like Examples include: Barbiturates. Thiazide diuretics. Corticosteroids. Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) and progesterone. Catecholamines. Decongestants that contain beta-adrenergic agents, such as pseudoephedrine. The B vitamin niacin. The risk of high blood sugar from niacin lowers after you have taken it for a few months. The antipsychotic medicine olanzapine (Zyprexa). This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

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