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Can Diarrhea Cause Low Blood Sugar

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Whether your head feels like it's stuffed with cotton because you have a cold or you're spending a lot of time on the toilet because of a stomach bug, being sick is no fun for anyone. For people with diabetes, being sick can also affect blood sugar levels. The good news is that taking a few extra precautions can help you keep your blood sugar levels under control. When you get sick whether it's a minor illness like a sore throat or cold or a bigger problem like dehydration or surgery the body perceives the illness as stress. To relieve the stress, the body fights the illness. This process requires more energy than the body normally uses. On one hand, this is good because it helps supply the extra fuel the body needs. On the other hand, in a person with diabetes, this can lead to high blood sugar levels. Some illnesses cause the opposite problem, though. If you don't feel like eating or have nausea or vomiting, and you're taking the same amount of insulin you normally do, you can develop blood sugar levels that are too low. Blood sugar levels can be very unpredictable when you're sick. Because you can't be sure how the illness will affect your blood sugar levels, it's important to check blood sugar levels often on sick days and adjust your insulin doses as needed. Your diabetes management plan will help you know what to do when you're sick. The plan might tell you: how to monitor your blood glucose levels and ketones when you're sick what changes you might make to your food and drink and diabetes medications In addition, people with diabetes should get the pneumococcal vaccine, which protects against some serious infections. You should also get a flu shot every year. These vaccines may help you keep your diabetes under better control and cut down on the number of sick d Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

I have a problem that I never see addressed. I've had type 1 diabetes for 36 years and been diagnosed as having diabetic diarrhea. Numerous tests have ruled out all other gastrointestinal problems. Is there any treatment for this problem? Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia is a dangerous condition in which your blood sugar drops perilously low. Low blood sugar will most often make you feel shaky and weak. In extreme cases, you could lose consciousness and slip into a coma. People develop hypoglycemia for different reasons, but those with diabetes run the greatest risk of developing the condition. Glucose and Hypoglycemia Your body uses glucose as its main fuel source. Glucose is derived from food, and it's delivered to cells through the bloodstream. The body uses different hormones to regulate the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucagon, cortisol, and epinephrine are some hormones that help regulate glucose. Your body uses another hormone called insulin to help your cells absorb glucose and burn it for fuel. If your blood sugar level drops below a certain point, your body can develop various symptoms and sensations. For people with diabetes, this typically happens when blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), although the exact level may vary from person to person. Causes of Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar often happens in people with diabetes who are using insulin or other medicines that increase insulin production or its actions. Too much insulin can make your blood glucose drop too low. Low blood sugar can happen if: Your body's supply of glucose is used up too quickly. Glucose is released into your bloodstream too slowly. There's too much insulin in your bloodstream. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Although no two people will have the exact same symptoms of low blood sugar, there are some common signs to watch out for: Sudden, intense hunger Dizziness or light-headedness Excessive sweating (often sudden and without regard to temperature) Shaking or tremors Sudden feelings of anxiety Irritability, mood swings, and Continue reading >>

What Makes Blood Sugar Levels Get Low?

What Makes Blood Sugar Levels Get Low?

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is uncommon in persons without diabetes. In otherwise healthy adults, fasting (lack of food) is the most common cause of low blood sugars. Medications such as insulin and drugs like alcohol are other primary culprits. Adults who are critically ill can also develop low blood sugars. In rare instances, hormonal disorders or tumors can be the problem. If for any reason you believe you are having symptoms related to low blood sugar that do not improve after eating, see a doctor for help. Hypoglycemia occurs for a variety of different reasons. Certain medications may cause hypoglycemia like insulin taken to lower the blood sugar in people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, your eating, exercising, and medication must be carefully balanced to keep your blood sugar within the normal range. Too much exercise or not enough food, relative to your medication, can cause low blood sugar. In people who do not have diabetes, certain medications, drinking alcoholic beverages, eating disorders, and tumors can cause hypoglycemia. Problems with your liver, kidneys, or the endocrine system may cause hypoglycemia. Sometimes hypoglycemia may occur when the body makes too much insulin in response to eating. A tendency toward hypoglycemia can be hereditary, but dietary carbohydrates usually play a central role in its cause, prevention, and treatment. Simple carbohydrates, or sugars, are quickly absorbed by the body, resulting in a rapid elevation in blood sugar level; this stimulates a corresponding excessive elevation in serum insulin levels, which can then lead to hypoglycemia. Insulin is the hormone responsible for lowering blood sugar by taking sugar out of the blood and putting it into cells. High levels of insulin mean low levels of blood glucose. Normal Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Mini-faq

Hypoglycemia Mini-faq

3. Thoughts on panicattacksby Miryam Williamson Revised: 12/18/95 1. HYPOGLYCEMIAby R. PaulSt. Amand, M.D., Assistant Clincial Professor of Medicine Endocrinology- U.C.L.A.. 4560 Admiralty Way, Suite 355, Marina del Rey, CA. 90292,(310)577-7510 'Hypoglycemia' isa wordoften used to denote a disease when it is actually only a symptom. Theterm means "low blood sugar" but often symptoms occur without aparticularlylow value. This syndrome is better defined as carbohydrate intoleranceresulting in symptoms due mainly to an overzealous neuro-endocrineresponse.Alternatively, it is the inability to effectively use certaincarbohydrateloads without adverse consequences. When one eatssugar orcomplex carbohydrates blood sugar rises and triggers insulin releasefromthe pancreas. This hormone facilitates entry of some carbohydrates intovarious parts of the body for utilization or storage. The liverconvertsthe excess to fatty acids and insulin drives deposits into fat cells astriglycerides, our fuel reserve. In hypoglycemics, insulin cut-off isinadequate,orhormonal release excessive or inappropriate for the situation. Thiscreatesa system-wide stress which results in the endocrine 'fatigue' syndromewe call "hypoglycemia". The standard fordiagnosishas been the five hour glucose tolerance test. A certain sugar solutionis given, and blood is drawn and tested at various intervals. Suchtestswere done in 1994 by Genter and Ipp(1) on a group of young, healthypeoplewho had no symptoms of hypoglycemia. Blood was sampled every tenminutesin order to measure the timing and amount of various hormones which arereleased to counter-balance insulin. These secretions attempt topreventexcessive decreases in blood sugar. One-half of these test subjectsdevelopedacute symptoms of hypoglycemia Continue reading >>

Post-prandial Reactive Hypoglycaemia And Diarrhea Caused By Idiopathic Accelerated Gastric Emptying: A Case Report

Post-prandial Reactive Hypoglycaemia And Diarrhea Caused By Idiopathic Accelerated Gastric Emptying: A Case Report

Go to: Abstract The majority of cases of post-prandial reactive hypoglycemia are considered idiopathic. Abnormalities of B-cell function and glucose regulation by insulin and glucagon have been postulated as causes but associated gastrointestinal dysfunction has not been reported. We report the first case of accelerated gastric emptying associated with post-prandial reactive hypoglycemia, abdominal bloating and diarrhea. We consider that gastric dysmotility is an important cause of this condition as treatment of the underlying abnormal gastric emptying allows effective control of symptoms. A 20-year-old Caucasian woman presented with post-prandial fatigue, sweating, nausea, faintness and intermittent confusion, which had led to pre-syncope and syncope on occasions. She also experienced marked abdominal bloating and diarrhea over the same period. These episodes responded to oral administration of sweet drinks. Her symptoms were ameliorated by modification of her diet. This is an original case report of the association of idiopathic accelerated gastric emptying with post-prandial reactive hypoglycemia and diarrhea. Family physicians, endocrinologists and gastroenterologists often consult patients with a constellation of post-prandial symptoms, which are considered to be idiopathic in most cases. This case indicates that gastric dysmotility might be the primary cause of these symptoms in some patients and, if found, offers a therapeutic target which in our case was successful. Go to: Idiopathic post-prandial reactive hypoglycemia has been defined as a one or two hour post-prandial glucose level of ≤3.9mmol/L, or a one to two hour glucose level lower than the fasting glucose level [1]. Others have defined it as a plasma glucose level of <3mmol/L in the post-prandial perio Continue reading >>

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

If you have “gut issues” – meaning diarrhea, constipation, cramping, abdominal pain or nausea – and you have diabetes, you are not alone. In fact, this relationship is more common than you – or your doctor – may realize. Up to 75% of people with diabetes have at least one gastrointestinal symptom. These GI problems can include diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The most common GI problem that results in diarrhea is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and the links between gut problems, namely IBS and blood sugars are tightly woven and interconnected. Even the severity of symptoms is closely linked to the glycemic control of the individual. Meaning the worse the glycemic control, the worse the GI symptoms. High blood sugars make it hard for the stomach and small intestine to work normally. At the same time, IBS itself can make it harder for your body to control post-prandial (or “after meal”) blood sugars. A Missed Diagnosis and Continued Suffering Sadly, people with diabetes suffer from the effect of undiagnosed IBS or other digestive disruption every day. Some people with diabetes are told their abdominal pain and gastrointestinal discomfort is just a complication of their poorly controlled blood sugars—leaving Irritable Bowel Syndrome (or other digestive disorders) undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. To complicate matters further, symptoms of both diabetes and IBS are greatly impacted by diet, stress, and general health. In diabetes, GI problems are often related to what’s referred to as autonomic gastrointestinal neuropathy resulting in abnormal motility. “Motility” refers to your body’s ability to move through the digestive system – including your stomach, small and large intestine at the right speed: not too fast, not to Continue reading >>

Diarrhoea

Diarrhoea

Tweet Diarrhoea is commonly experienced as a result of gastroenteritis but may also be caused by specific medication including statins and metformin. Diarrhoea is defined as passing loose, watery stools more than three times a day. Diarrhoea may also result from conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, coeliac disease and autonomic neuropathy. Common causes of diarrhoea The NHS lists gastroenteritis, bowel infection, as the most common cause of diarrhoea. Gastroenteritis can be caused by a bacterial or viral infection. Other relatively common causes of diarrhoea include: Food intolerances - such as lactose or gluten intolerance Irritable Bowel Syndrome Drinking too much coffee or alcohol Read further below for causes more specifically related to diabetes. Diagnosing diarrhoea In most cases diarrhoea will clear within a week. If diarrhoea persists longer is accompanied by other symptoms such as: Fever Blood in your stools Vomiting Unexplained weight loss If you have recently been treated in hospital or have recently been put onto antibiotics see your GP. To diagnose the cause of persistent diarrhoea, your GP will review the medications you are on and will likely ask questions about your bowel movements and other questions which may help to isolate a possible cause. Your GP may need to take a stool sample or a blood test or perform a rectal examination if further information is needed. Treating diarrhoea Depending on the cause of diarrhoea, treatment may vary. See further below for more about specific causes related to diabetes. Whilst you have diarrhoea, it is important to take regular drinks of fluid, ideally water, as you will lose more water than usual through diarrhoea. High blood glucose, which can also commonly result from viral infections, can also increase th Continue reading >>

Is Diarrhea A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Is Diarrhea A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Diabetes occurs when your body is unable to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that your pancreas releases when you eat. It allows your cells to absorb sugar. Your cells use this sugar to make energy. If your body isn’t able to use or absorb this sugar, it builds up in your blood. This causes your blood sugar levels to increase. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. People with either form of diabetes experience many of the same symptoms and complications. One such complication is diarrhea. About 22 percent of people with diabetes experience frequent diarrhea. Researchers are unsure whether this is related to issues in the small bowel or the colon. It’s unclear what causes persistent diarrhea in people who have diabetes. Most people have experienced diarrhea at one point in their lives. People with diabetes may often need to pass a significant amount of loose stool at night. Being unable to control a bowel movement, or having incontinence, is also common in people who have diabetes. Diarrhea may be regular, or it may alternate with periods of regular bowel movements. It may also alternate with constipation. Learn more: Diabetes and constipation: What’s the connection? » The cause for the connection between diabetes and diarrhea isn’t clear, but research suggests that neuropathy may be a factor. Neuropathy refers to numbness or pain resulting from nerve damage. If you have diabetes, high blood sugar levels can damage your nerve fibers. This generally occurs in the hands or feet. Issues with neuropathy are common causes for many of the complications that accompany diabetes. Another possible cause is sorbitol. People often use this sweetener in diabetic foods. Sorbitol has proven to be a potent laxative in amounts as small as 10 grams. An imba Continue reading >>

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

Upswing: Caffeine Your blood sugar can rise after you have coffee -- even black coffee with no calories -- thanks to the caffeine. The same goes for black tea, green tea, and energy drinks. Each person with diabetes reacts to foods and drinks differently, so it's best to keep track of your own responses. Ironically, other compounds in coffee may help prevent type 2 diabetes in healthy people. Many of these will raise your blood sugar levels. Why? They can still have plenty of carbs from starches. Check the total carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts label before you dig in. You should also pay attention to sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol. They add sweetness with fewer carbs than sugar (sucrose), but they may still have enough to boost your levels. One study found that people with type 2 diabetes who switched to a vegan (or all vegetable-based) diet had better blood sugar control and needed less insulin. A boost in fiber from whole grains and beans might play a role, by slowing down the digestion of carbs. But scientists need more research to know if going vegan really helps diabetes. Talk to your doctor before you make major diet changes. Blood sugar can dip dangerously low during shut-eye for some people with diabetes, especially if they take insulin. It's best to check your levels at bedtime and when you wake up. A snack before bed may help. For some people, blood sugar can rise in the morning -- even before breakfast -- due to changes in hormones or a drop in insulin. Regular testing is important. One option is a continuous blood glucose monitor, which can alert you to highs and lows. Physical activity is a great health booster for everyone. But people with diabetes should tailor it to what they need. When you work out hard enough to sweat and raise your h Continue reading >>

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

Print Overview Low blood pressure might seem desirable, and for some people, it causes no problems. However, for many people, abnormally low blood pressure (hypotension) can cause dizziness and fainting. In severe cases, low blood pressure can be life-threatening. A blood pressure reading lower than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for the top number (systolic) or 60 mm Hg for the bottom number (diastolic) is generally considered low blood pressure. The causes of low blood pressure can range from dehydration to serious medical or surgical disorders. It's important to find out what's causing your low blood pressure so that it can be treated. Symptoms For some people, low blood pressure signals an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms such as: Dizziness or lightheadedness Fainting (syncope) Blurred vision Nausea Fatigue Lack of concentration Shock Extreme hypotension can result in this life-threatening condition. Signs and symptoms include: Confusion, especially in older people Cold, clammy, pale skin Rapid, shallow breathing Weak and rapid pulse When to see a doctor If you have indications of shock, seek emergency medical help. If you have consistently low blood pressure readings but feel fine, your doctor is likely just to monitor you during routine exams. Even occasional dizziness or lightheadedness may be a relatively minor problem — the result of mild dehydration from too much time in the sun or a hot tub, for example. Still, it's important to see your doctor if you have signs or symptoms of hypotension because they can point to more-serious problems. It can be helpful to keep a record of your symptoms, when they occur and what you're doing at the time. Causes Blood pressure is a measurement of the pressure i Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia may be described as low levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. This is commonly seen in people who are diabetic, and their blood sugar levels fall too low - either because they took their medications and did not eat properly, or the dosage of medication is too high for them. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels much lower than these can indicate hypoglycemia. Causes of Hypoglycemia: Causes of hypoglycemia may include: Excessive exercise, or lack of food intake Certain forms of alcohol may cause low blood sugar levels Certain kinds of tumors, affecting the pancreas (insulinomas) After stomach surgery People with kidney failure, who are on dialysis, may experience hypoglycemia. If you have liver disease, you may be at risk for hypoglycemia. You may have problems with your thyroid, adrenal, or pituitary glands. You may not be absorbing food that you eat very well, thus resulting in hypoglycemia. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: You may feel sweaty, shaky or hungry. You may feel faint. Extremely low blood sugar levels may cause you to be confused, or disoriented. Severely low levels of blood sugar may cause coma. You may have a fast heartbeat, or feel palpitations. Things You Can Do About Hypoglycemia: If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels as a result of your treatment of diabetes, your healthcare provider may instruct you on the use of close blood sugar monitoring during this time. Follow all of your healthcare provider's instructions. Try to exercise. Low blood sugar levels are often temporary. If you are diabetic, you will have high blood sugars as well. Make a daily walk either alone, or with a friend or family member a part of your routine. Even light wal Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

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