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Can Diabetics Use Salicylic Acid?

My Doctor Online The Permanente Medical Group

My Doctor Online The Permanente Medical Group

Are you having back pain with any of the following? Severe pain, weakness or tingling in your leg(s). Difficulty stopping urination or loss of control of bladder or bowels. A history of cancer or unexplained weight loss. No, I am not experiencing any of the above health issues. Yes, and I have not discussed these health issues with my doctor. Yes, I have one or more of these health issues but have been cleared by my doctor to proceed with this program. We understand that you are experiencing one or more of the health issues that might be impacting your back pain. We recommend that you discuss these health issues with your doctor before proceeding with this program. Once you are cleared by your doctor to do this program, we hope it helps you find relief from your back pain. Corns and calluses are areas of thick, hard skin that develop from repeated pressure and friction on the skin, usually over bony areas. The cause is often wearing tight shoes that rub on your toes or working with your hands and not wearing gloves. Corns usually appear on the sides and tops of your toes. Calluses typically develop on the soles or your feet or on your hands. The skin tries to protect itself from friction or pressure by thickening and hardening. In healthy people, corns and calluses eventually go away on their own once you remove the cause, such as by wearing properly fitted shoes or gloves. Corns and calluses are not serious for most people. However, if you have diabetes or circulation problems, be sure to schedule an appointment so we may promptly treat your corns or calluses to prevent infection or other complications. Corns and calluses appear as hard, thick, raised bumps of skin that are often tender. Your skin might also be dry and flake or peel. Corns and calluses develop in area Continue reading >>

Potential Role Of Salicylates In Type 2 Diabetes.

Potential Role Of Salicylates In Type 2 Diabetes.

Ann Pharmacother. 2010 Jul-Aug;44(7-8):1207-21. doi: 10.1345/aph.1M483. Epub 2010 Jun 1. Potential role of salicylates in type 2 diabetes. Drug Information, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10032, USA. [email protected] To review the evidence base supporting the use of salicylates for glucose level control in patients with type 2 diabetes and provide a comprehensive review of available information describing the potential role of salicylates and, in particular, salsalate, for glucose control in type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. A literature search using MEDLINE (1966-March 2010), PubMed, and Google Scholar was conducted using the search terms salicylates, salicylic acid, aspirin, salsalate, acetylsalicylic acid, insulin, glucose, glycemic control, diabetes, hyperglycemia, and nuclear factor. The bibliographies of identified articles were reviewed for additional citations. All relevant English-language information on the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of salicylates for glucose control related to insulin resistance or diabetes prevention were reviewed. Preclinical data, clinical trials, and case reports were identified, evaluated, and included in this systematic review. Treatment of inflammation may be a potential novel strategy in prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, in which the body is resistant to the effects of insulin. Previous and recent studies reveal a possible relationship between inflammation and obesity. The chronic activation of the immune system due to low-grade inflammation was found in several studies to be associated with obesity, and this, in turn, can promote development of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. Administration of salicylates was shown over a century ago to lower glucose levels in patients with Continue reading >>

Salicylic Acid (topical Route)

Salicylic Acid (topical Route)

Use this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than recommended on the label, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. To do so may increase the chance of absorption through the skin and the chance of salicylic acid poisoning. This medicine is for use only on the skin. Do not get any of it in your eyes, nose, or mouth . Rinse it off with water right away if it does get on these areas. Before using an OTC acne product for the first time, apply a small amount to one or two small affected areas of the skin for 3 days. If no discomfort occurs, follow the directions on the drug facts label of the product. If your doctor has ordered an occlusive dressing (airtight covering, such as kitchen plastic wrap) to be applied over this medicine, make sure you know how to apply it. Since an occlusive dressing will increase the amount of medicine absorbed through your skin and the possibility of salicylic acid poisoning, use it only as directed. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor. Keep this medicine away from the eyes and other mucous membranes, such as the mouth and inside of the nose. If you should accidentally get some in your eyes or on other mucous membranes, immediately flush them with water for 15 minutes. Apply enough medicine to cover the affected area, and rub in gently. Before using salicylic acid gel, apply wet packs to the affected areas for at least 5 minutes. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor. Apply enough gel to cover the affected areas, and rub in gently. Do not rinse off medicine after treatment. To use the plaster for warts, corns, or calluses: This medicine comes with patient instructions. Read them carefully before using. Do Continue reading >>

Diabetic Footcare

Diabetic Footcare

Diabetics are often more susceptible to infections that dont heal, poor circulation, known as peripheral vascular disease and numbness in the feet, known as peripheral neuropathy. High blood sugar makes the skin a perfect breeding ground for bacteria, a dangerous situation if you cant feel injuries to your feet. Because an infection that doesnt heal can lead to serious complications it is essential that the diabetic patient prevents infections with careful foot care. Diabetic feet require special care and attention. The following recommendations are all important and necessary. They have been designed to help you establish a daily routine to care for your feet and to avoid, rather than invite trouble that can lead to more serious problems including ulcers, infections, gangrene, loss of toe or toes, and in some cases, loss of life. DO wash your feet daily in warm, but not hot water. Test the temperature of the water with the elbow or a thermometer not the hand, which may also be affected. Use soap, not detergent or an emulsion prescribed by your GP if the skin is excessively dry. Dry the feet thoroughly with a soft towel, patting rather than rubbing the skin. Ensure that you have dried thoroughly between your toes. DO use an emollient based foot cream to massage your feet morning and night to keep the skin soft and smooth. DO examine your feet thoroughly on a daily basis. Inspect all surfaces of the foot, check between the toes for cracks, corns, blisters etc. Use a mirror on the floor to see underneath the foot if this helps. If you cannot see well enough to do this for yourself, ask the assistance of someone who can. ALWAYS have your Foot Health Practitioner or Podiatrist/Chiropodist trim your nails because an ingrown nail or even the slightest nick in the skin from n Continue reading >>

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you should be aware of foot damage as a potential complication. Foot damage is often caused by poor circulation and nerve damage. Both of these conditions can be caused by high blood sugar levels over time. Taking good care of your feet can help lower your risk of foot damage. Although some people soak their feet in Epsom salt baths, this home remedy isn’t recommended for people with diabetes. Soaking your feet may raise your risk of foot problems. Talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in Epsom salts. Epsom salt is also called magnesium sulphate. It’s a mineral compound that’s sometimes used as a home remedy for sore muscles, bruises, and splinters. In some cases, people add Epsom salt to baths or tubs to soak in. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in an Epsom salt bath. Soaking your feet may actually increase your risk of foot problems. It’s recommended that you wash your feet every day, but you shouldn’t soak them. Soaking can dry out your skin. This can cause cracks to form and lead to infections. Some people may recommend Epsom salts as a magnesium supplement. Instead, you should look for magnesium supplements designed for oral use. Check the vitamin and supplement aisle at your local pharmacy. People with diabetes often have low levels of magnesium, a mineral that plays an important role in your body. Research suggests that oral magnesium supplements may help improve blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels in some people with diabetes. Unless your doctor advises otherwise, avoid using Epsom salt footbaths. If you’re interested in oral magnesium supplements, ask your doctor for more information. They can help you assess the potential benefits and risks of taking them. They can also recommend a Continue reading >>

Medicated Foot Pads Could Pose Diabetics Significant Danger

Medicated Foot Pads Could Pose Diabetics Significant Danger

Diabetics commonly have corns and calluses on their feet, which are the result of abnormal skin pressure due to an underlying prominent bone that presses skin into a shoe in the case of a corn or the ground below in the case of a callus. These corns and calluses can either be simply a nuisance, or they can cause pain and discomfort. Unfortunately, these pressure areas can lead to skin wounds if the corn or callus is not kept thin, as the pressure from a thick callus can lead to death of the healthy skin below, leading to a diabetic ulcer. Since corns and callus care is so very important for diabetics, the need for proper treatment becomes vital in the effort to protect the skin of the foot from harm. Unfortunately, many diabetics go about this the wrong way, and cause more harm than good. Since diabetics often have poor sensation in the feet, the act of trying to shave one's own corns or calluses is obviously a poor choice, as it is too easy to accidentally cut into the flesh without feeling much pain, which can lead to an infection. However, another more dangerous treatment solution lurks innocently on pharmacy shelves, luring unsuspecting diabetics. Medicated corn pads may sound benign, but are actually quite dangerous to someone with skin at risk of harm, such as diabetics and those with poor circulation. These 'medicated' pads usually contain salicylic acid, which is anything but medicine. This acid is used legitimately to dissolve hard skin, often for treatment of warts and other skin lesions. While it can be used to dissolve callus tissue, the problem lies in how the acid solution is applied to the skin. Salicylic acid and similar compounds do not make a distinction between callus tissue and the surrounding healthy skin. When applied for a prolonged period of time Continue reading >>

Foot Care For Diabetics – Appendix D

Foot Care For Diabetics – Appendix D

Although not directly related to the normalization of blood sugars, this short but important section on foot care has been included because of the constant danger diabetes can present to the lower extremities. The incidence of limb-threatening ulcerations in diabetics is very high, affecting approximately one in six to seven patients. Nonhealing “diabetic” ulcers are the major cause of leg, foot, and toe amputations in this country, after traumatic injuries such as those occurring in motor vehicle accidents. These ulcerations do not occur spontaneously; they are always preceded by gradual or sudden injury to the skin by some external factor. Preventing such injuries can prevent their sad consequences. Virtually all diabetics who have experienced ongoing higher-than normal blood sugars for more than five years suffer some loss of sensitivity in their feet to pain, pressure, and temperature. This is because prolonged blood sugar elevation can injure and eventually destroy all sensory nerves in the feet (sensory neuropathy). Furthermore, the nerves that control the shape of the foot are likewise injured, with a resultant deformity that includes “claw” or “hammer” toes, high arch, and prominent heads of bones at the bases of the toes on the underside of the foot. The nerves that stimulate perspiration in the feet are also affected. This results in the classic dry, often cracked skin that we see on diabetic feet. Dry skin is both more easily damaged and slower to heal than is normal, moist skin, and cracks permit entry of infectious bacteria. Long term elevated blood sugar also may cause impairment of circulation in the major arteries of the legs, as well as in the minor arteries and small capillary blood vessels that supply the skin of the feet. In order to heal Continue reading >>

Salicylic Acid Topical

Salicylic Acid Topical

Pronunciation: SAL i SIL ik AS id TOP ik al Brand: Acnevir, Compound W, DermalZone, Dermarest Psoriasis Skin Treatment, Dr Scholl's Callus Removers, Dr Scholl's Clear Away Wart Remover, Dr Scholl's Corn Removers, Freezone Corn Remover, Keralyt, Mediplast, Oxy Face Scrub, Salex, Scalpicin Scalp Relief, Stri-Dex, UltraSal-ER, Wart Remover What is the most important information I should know about salicylic acid topical? Salicylic acid topical can cause a rare but serious allergic reaction or severe skin irritation. Stop using this medicine and get emergency medical help if you have: hives, itching; difficult breathing, feeling light-headed; or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. There are many brands and forms of salicylic acid available. Not all brands are listed on this leaflet. Salicylic acid is a keratolytic (peeling agent). Salicylic acid causes shedding of the outer layer of skin. Salicylic acid topical (for the skin) is used in the treatment of acne, dandruff, seborrhea, or psoriasis, and to remove corns, calluses, and warts. Salicylic acid topical may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using salicylic acid topical? You should not use salicylic acid topical if you are allergic to it. Do not give this medication to a child or teenager with a fever, flu symptoms, or chicken pox. Salicylic acid can cause Reye's syndrome, a serious and sometimes fatal condition in children. Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use this medicine if you have other medical conditions, especially: It is not known whether salicylic acid topical will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant. It is not known whether salicylic acid Continue reading >>

Foot Care

Foot Care

Drugstore Do’s and Don’t’s Even with diabetes, your feet can last a lifetime, and they stand a better chance of doing so if you treat them with tender, loving care. That includes giving them a daily inspection for cuts and abrasions as well as asking your doctor to examine them periodically for any signs of nerve damage, such as loss of sensation, or reduced blood flow, such as coldness or hair loss on the feet and legs. The tools or products you use on your feet at home can have profound effects on their health, particularly if you have any degree of nerve damage or reduced blood flow in your feet. Using the right products can help to keep your skin – and feet – intact, while using the wrong ones can lead to breaks in the skin, which can allow bacteria to enter and, in the worst-case scenario, lead to foot ulcers. Here, then, is your guide to over-the-counter foot products, including some that are safe to use and some to avoid. Soap Washing your feet with warm or tepid water and soap every day keeps them clean and gives you a good chance to do that daily inspection. (If it’s hard to see your feet, run your fingers over them to feel for calluses or sore spots. The backs of your hands are sensitive to heat and can be run over your feet to find hot spots, which can indicate infection.) There must be at least 50 varieties of soap on the shelves of most drugstores – liquid soaps, solid bar soaps, scented soaps, unscented soaps, etc. Which to choose? In general, bar soaps are a better choice than liquid soaps, and soaps that have moisturizing lotion in them are the best choice of all. The compound in soap that gives it its lather is a fatty acid called lanolin, and the more lather, the softer the soap. In most cases, bar soaps have more lather than liquid. The Continue reading >>

Can A Unique Ointment Improve Daily Foot Care In Patients With Diabetes?

Can A Unique Ointment Improve Daily Foot Care In Patients With Diabetes?

Can A Unique Ointment Improve Daily Foot Care In Patients With Diabetes? While there are a plethora of over-the-counter (OTC) foot care treatments podiatrists may recommend to patients, DPMs have cited Kerasal Foot Ointment for its unique properties and over a decade of reliability. Michael Golf, DPM, PA, has been recommending Kerasal Foot Ointment for over 10 years. Both Dr. Golf and Marc A. Brenner, DPM, acknowledge the benefits of the ointments composition, which consists of salicylic acid 5% and urea 10%. Dr. Golf explains that the urea hydrates the skin while the salicylic acid component enhances the ureas keratolytic effects. This is a good combination for people who have developed hyperkeratosis and dyshidrosis, claims Dr. Golf, who is certified by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery and is in private practice in Austin, Tx. Kerasal Foot Ointment comes in 15g and 30g sizes. According to the manufacturer, Alterna, LLC, the salicylic acid 5% component of the ointment exfoliates dead cells from skin surfaces while the urea 10% component helps to retain moisture in new surface skin cells. Encouraging Patients To Take An Active Role In Self-Care Drs. Brenner and Golf agree that the ointment is an effective option for treating the diabetic foot as well. Dr. Brenner recommends the ointment to almost every diabetic patient. Dr. Golf cites the ointments hydration and natural sloughing properties. Drs. Brenner and Golf agree that the OTC availability of Kerasal Foot Ointment has advantages. By getting the patient to mechanically touch his or her feet by applying the ointment, it helps facilitate better self-care, states Dr. Golf. Dr. Brenner agrees, adding that educating the diabetic patient about foot care, particularly regular examination, definitely helps facilitat Continue reading >>

Minor Wound Care For Diabetic Patients

Minor Wound Care For Diabetic Patients

Within the realm of nonprescription products and devices, several carry a specific warning against use on diabetic skin. The greatest concern is with salicylic acid, which acts to intentionally create a wound. Its ability to slowly erode epidermis is useful for minor problems such as warts, corns and calluses. However, all salicylic acid products carry a strict contraindication against use by diabetic patients. This warning should be extended to various corn and callus removal devices. These products present varying degrees of danger to diabetic patients. There are "pumice stones," a type of solid rock; some are attached to contoured handles. These rocks may even be labeled "beauty stones." The patient is encouraged to intentionally abrade the skin by rubbing it with the rock in a misguided attempt to remove rough skin. The fallacy is that skin (e.g., elbows and knees) roughens in response to trauma. Thus, abrasion with a rock is counterproductive at best, and could cause serious infection in the diabetic who uses it to reduce a corn or callus. Other products to be avoided resemble vegetable graters, and are either perforated metal plates attached to a handle, or are actual files. A final group is "corn planes" which appear to be hair removal razors, except the distal end has a curved razor blade in it. The patient is instructed to draw it across the skin, removing successive layers of epidermis, much as a dermatologist uses a dermatome to remove skin prior to transplantation. These graters, files and planes should be advised against, and the diabetic patient who contemplates their use must be cautioned most strongly to see a podiatrist or a physician instead. If a diabetic patient has an existing infection that is not located on the foot (e.g., folliculitis, carbuncle Continue reading >>

Is It Ok For Diabetic To Use Corn Remover On Feet?

Is It Ok For Diabetic To Use Corn Remover On Feet?

I am a type 2 diabetic with an average hemoglobin A1C of 6.1. Would it be safe to use an over-the-counter liquid corn remover on my foot? Dear Brian: Thanks for your question. It's a wonderful opportunity to review what adult-onset or type 2 diabetics should be doing to prevent complications. Most family physicians and internal medicine specialists are qualified to care for uncomplicated type 2 diabetes. In addition to encouraging the patient to follow a strict diet in which carbohydrates are restricted and patients measure their blood sugar several times a day, we generally will do several other blood tests several times a year. For example, cholesterol and lipids are measured and abnormal levels treated. Kidney function tests are done to assess for damage. A hemoglobin A1C blood test is usually done every three to six months. The hemoglobin A1C is a measure of blood sugar control levels over the past three months or so. Less that 6.5 percent is good blood sugar control. That test also offers additional information beyond the measured blood sugars. Diabetics are at risk of diseases of the eye, kidney, nervous system and cardiovascular system. Keeping blood sugars in control decreases the risks of these diseases but does not decrease risk to zero. Every diabetic needs ongoing visits to a physician to handle general diabetes treatment, a podiatrist for foot care, an ophthalmologist for eye exams and a dentist to monitor for gum and tooth disease. Most physicians would strongly suggest that a diabetic patient see a podiatrist on a regular basis for routine foot care and for examinations. I suggest this even to those who have good control of their disease. Most diabetic patients should have their toenails professionally cut by a podiatrist or a pedicurist trained by a podi Continue reading >>

Help Getting Rid Of A Wart

Help Getting Rid Of A Wart

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have a stubborn wart on my index finger. Normally I'd treat it with one of those salicylic acid dots or the liquid form, but they say not to use them if you are diabetic. I don't have insurance right now, so seeing a dermatologist to have it frozen off isn't an option. I've seen the freeze option available as a home use now, but was hesitant if it was worth the money. anyone have any methods of getting rid of these that are safe for diabetics? also, why is the salicylic acid harmful to diabetics? as far as I know, it's the only ingredient in the concoction. I had two tiny warts on my forehead. I got rid of them by applying a liquid given to me by an ayurvedic doctor. The liquid did burn a lot if applied to normal skin. I think it would be the same salicylic acid that you are talking about. I hadn't heard of diabetics not using the solution, and since it was an external affair, I didn't even bother about it. the advise that diabetics should not use acids or freezing solutions to remove warts without medical supervision is one of safety akin to printing "may cause drowsiness" on the side of a sedative. If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy, and thus cannot feel pain in the area you are treating, it is a bad idea to try and treat it yourself. Otherwise you should be fine! I have a stubborn wart on my index finger. Normally I'd treat it with one of those salicylic acid dots or the liquid form, but they say not to use them if you are diabetic. I don't have insurance right now, so seeing a dermatologist to have it frozen off isn't an option. I've seen the freeze option available as a home use Continue reading >>

Salicylic Acid Topical Advanced Patient Information - Drugs.com

Salicylic Acid Topical Advanced Patient Information - Drugs.com

Acne Advice: Skin Care Solutions For Both Teens and Adults Alike Salicylic acid topical is used to treat many skin disorders, such as acne, dandruff, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis of the skin and scalp, calluses, corns, common warts, and plantar warts, depending on the dosage form and strength of the preparation. Salicylic acid is available without a prescription. Some of these preparations are available only with your doctor's prescription. In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For salicylic acid, the following should be considered: Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to salicylic acid or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully. Young children may be at increased risk of unwanted effects because of increased absorption of salicylic acid through the skin. Also, young children may be more likely to get skin irritation from salicylic acid. Salicylic acid should not be applied to large areas of the body, used for long periods of time, or used under occlusive dressing (air-tight covering, such as kitchen plastic wrap) in children. Use of salicylic acid topical in children younger than 2 years of age is not recommended. Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of salicylic acid topical in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related blood vessel disease, which may require caution in patients receiving salicylic acid topic Continue reading >>

Danger: Diabetics And Medicated Corn Pads!

Danger: Diabetics And Medicated Corn Pads!

Danger: Diabetics and Medicated Corn Pads! First, to quickly review, corns and calluses are very different from each other in location, size, appearance, and pain level. Corns are very painful lesions that usually develop on non-weightbearing areas of the foot, such as the top of the toes or in between the toes. Their appearance is very different from calluses in that they are usually red, small, and have hard center. A callus is usually found in areas of weightbearing on the foot, such as the heel or ball of the foot. Calluses are large and the entire lesion is rough and hard. Both corns and calluses develop due to friction from either not wearing shoes or poorly fitting shoes that rub on the feet. Corns are usually much more painful than calluses, so many patients seek any type of relief they can find; however, beware that the advertised over-the-counter pre-medicated corn pads are dangerous. What is in a pre-medicated corn pad that makes it dangerous? To simplify, salicylic acid is a chemical that works to get rid of the corn by melting or burning the thick and hard skin. This is extremely dangerous for patients who have peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy causes a loss of sensation in the feet. Patients who usually suffer from peripheral neuropathy include: Diabetics-at least 50% of all patients with diabetes Autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome Patient undergoing chemotherapy treatment If you are patient who has one of these diseases you should not use pre-medicated corn pads. The reasoning for not using these pre-medicated corn pads is that you may be unaware, due to the decreased sensation caused by the peripheral neuropathy, that the corn pad is melting/burning your skin too much. If the pre-medicated co Continue reading >>

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