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Can Diabetics Use Corn Removers?

Why Cant Diabetics Use Callus Remover

Why Cant Diabetics Use Callus Remover

Most of the diabeticshave an open-ended question as towhy cant diabetics use callus remover? Well, Diabetic feet need special care and attention, as they are among the major causes of health issues as well as hospitalization due to impair circulation and nerve damage. Too much accumulation of glucose in blood which is often termed as blood sugar can cause nerve damage and poor blood flow. This further leads to serious foot problems. A diabetic patient may suffer from numbness in their feet and lower leg region which many times leads to minor issues escalated into bigger serious health problems just like an amputation or infection of the toes and feet. When the person is suffering from diabetes, paying proper attention to the feet is quite mandatory. This is especially more important for the people who are suffering from diabetic neuropathy, which is a side effect of diabetes in the nerve end of the feet and leads to painful feet. The calluses and corns contribute a lot in making the matter worse and increase the sufferings of the person. Callus is basically the thickening of skin due to excessive pressure and friction on that particular region of the feet. In normal cases, the thickened parts contribute in protecting the parts from becoming wounds. But in case of diabetes patients, the same callus can hide the graver wounds inside, which lead to foot ulcers. These ulcers are quite painful and can also cause infection. Since the feet of diabetics are quite sensitive, that is one of the classical answers to the question why cant diabetics use callus remover. Most of the physicians strongly recommend that a diabetic patient should seek a podiatrist on a regular basis in order to get a regular foot care. A small cut or abrasion during the electric callus remover might lead Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes Foot Care: How Are Corns & Calluses Treated?

Understanding Diabetes Foot Care: How Are Corns & Calluses Treated?

Our talented and compassionate doctors all have clinical appointments at the Mt Sinai School of Medicine or are part of the Mt. Sinai Beth Israel Faculty practice. As the official podiatrists for the NYC Triathlon, Hamptons Marathon, Bridgehampton Half and NY Lizards, we know the needs and concerns of runners, triathletes, and other athletes. Dr. Geldwert is now seeing patients at Manhattan Orthopedic and Sports Medicine at 57 West 57th Street on Wednesdays between 8:30am and 12:30pm At the Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine, our only goal is to get you walking, running, biking, hiking, or whatever you enjoy- without pain. Understanding Diabetes Foot Care: How Are Corns & Calluses Treated? Posted by Jenn F. on Wednesday, September 25th, 2013 It is estimated that 65 out of 1,000 people have a corn or a callus. These skin aberrations may not seem like a big deal, because often, they cause little if any pain to the person who has them. However, for a diabetic, these little foot blights can open up the body to infection and cause ulcers that may lead to amputation or even death! No foot issue, no matter how insignificant it may seem, should be overlooked by a diabetic. Learn more about corns and calluses in todays post The New York Times defines a corn as a protective layer of dead skin cells that forms due to repeated friction. Corns are cone-shaped and knobby, and pressure on them can cause sharp pain. They most often develop along the pinky toe, but they can also form on top of or between toes. They can be hard or soft, depending on how much sweating and moisture that part of the foot receives. Sometimes corns develop as the result of deformed or crooked toes, but they are most often formed by tight shoes that place too much pressure on the foot. Though there Continue reading >>

Foot Care For Diabetics – Appendix D

Foot Care For Diabetics – Appendix D

Although not directly related to the normalization of blood sugars, this short but important section on foot care has been included because of the constant danger diabetes can present to the lower extremities. The incidence of limb-threatening ulcerations in diabetics is very high, affecting approximately one in six to seven patients. Nonhealing “diabetic” ulcers are the major cause of leg, foot, and toe amputations in this country, after traumatic injuries such as those occurring in motor vehicle accidents. These ulcerations do not occur spontaneously; they are always preceded by gradual or sudden injury to the skin by some external factor. Preventing such injuries can prevent their sad consequences. Virtually all diabetics who have experienced ongoing higher-than normal blood sugars for more than five years suffer some loss of sensitivity in their feet to pain, pressure, and temperature. This is because prolonged blood sugar elevation can injure and eventually destroy all sensory nerves in the feet (sensory neuropathy). Furthermore, the nerves that control the shape of the foot are likewise injured, with a resultant deformity that includes “claw” or “hammer” toes, high arch, and prominent heads of bones at the bases of the toes on the underside of the foot. The nerves that stimulate perspiration in the feet are also affected. This results in the classic dry, often cracked skin that we see on diabetic feet. Dry skin is both more easily damaged and slower to heal than is normal, moist skin, and cracks permit entry of infectious bacteria. Long term elevated blood sugar also may cause impairment of circulation in the major arteries of the legs, as well as in the minor arteries and small capillary blood vessels that supply the skin of the feet. In order to heal Continue reading >>

Foot Care And Diabetes

Foot Care And Diabetes

A small cut on a toe once sent Stella Anderson* to the emergency room. Most people would have just slapped a band-aid on the "injury" and forgotten about it. But most people don't have diabetes. Unlike people with normal blood sugar, diabetics need to examine their feet daily for the slightest injury. Since diabetes can cause neuropathy -- nerve death or damage -- a small cut could go undetected and lead to serious infection. After living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years, Anderson knew she had to be careful. The disease had already killed many nerves in her feet, which meant she couldn't feel scrapes, cuts, blisters, or other sores. "I always joked that somebody could cut off my toes, and I'd never feel it," Anderson says. Worse, the disease had harmed her circulation, so that the blood flow to her feet had slowed to a trickle. As a result, even the most trivial sores would be slow to heal. Anderson usually checked her feet after her morning shower, but she let the chore slide during a hectic week. She never noticed the small cut on her toe. By the time she saw a thin red streak running from her foot to her ankle, an infection was already raging. It took a trip to the emergency room and intravenous antibiotics to save her foot. What are diabetes-related foot problems? Anderson still walks on two feet, but many people with diabetes aren't so fortunate. Every year, about 80,000 diabetics lose a leg, foot, or toes. And in almost every case, this catastrophic injury had very humble beginnings. If diabetes has already dulled the sensations and slowed down circulation in your feet, just about any break in the skin can turn into a dangerous, festering wound. It may start with a callus, a small blister, a corn, a cut, or a scrape. Often, these seemingly trivial problems turn i Continue reading >>

Anonymous Question - Why Can't I Use Corn Plasters? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Anonymous Question - Why Can't I Use Corn Plasters? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Anonymous Question Why can't I use corn plasters? Anonymous Question Other Diabetes Team Member Why shouldn't I use corn plasters I know they are impregnanted with an acid type solution to burn the corn out but why can't I use them. What harm can be caused To submit a question, please go to There are constant warnings around for those with diabetes and many medicines include these. The asumption is that you have very high blood sugar and at risk of infection etc. If you blood sugar is well-controlled then I see no reason for a diabetic to be treated any differently from anyone else. I now ignore most of these warnings unless I can see a good reason. I think the reason is that some diabetics lose sensation in some of their extremities. For individuals like that, the acid could do quite a bit of damage, without the individual feeling any pain or discomfort. I think manufacturers will always err on the side of caution, which clearly makes sense. Personally, I wouldn't want to be using a corn plaster; diabetic or not. My understanding is they work by two means - the cut off the oxygen to the skin, which inhibits growth of the corn, and the acid softens the callous. The best way to treat the corn would be to take it to a chiropodist which as a diabetic you can be referred to by your GP the acid could do quite a bit of damage, without the individual feeling any pain or discomfort. A conundrum: If the individual is not feeling any pain or discomfort why does the corn hurt? A con Continue reading >>

Danger: Diabetics And Medicated Corn Pads!

Danger: Diabetics And Medicated Corn Pads!

Danger: Diabetics and Medicated Corn Pads! First, to quickly review, corns and calluses are very different from each other in location, size, appearance, and pain level. Corns are very painful lesions that usually develop on non-weightbearing areas of the foot, such as the top of the toes or in between the toes. Their appearance is very different from calluses in that they are usually red, small, and have hard center. A callus is usually found in areas of weightbearing on the foot, such as the heel or ball of the foot. Calluses are large and the entire lesion is rough and hard. Both corns and calluses develop due to friction from either not wearing shoes or poorly fitting shoes that rub on the feet. Corns are usually much more painful than calluses, so many patients seek any type of relief they can find; however, beware that the advertised over-the-counter pre-medicated corn pads are dangerous. What is in a pre-medicated corn pad that makes it dangerous? To simplify, salicylic acid is a chemical that works to get rid of the corn by melting or burning the thick and hard skin. This is extremely dangerous for patients who have peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy causes a loss of sensation in the feet. Patients who usually suffer from peripheral neuropathy include: Diabetics-at least 50% of all patients with diabetes Autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome Patient undergoing chemotherapy treatment If you are patient who has one of these diseases you should not use pre-medicated corn pads. The reasoning for not using these pre-medicated corn pads is that you may be unaware, due to the decreased sensation caused by the peripheral neuropathy, that the corn pad is melting/burning your skin too much. If the pre-medicated co Continue reading >>

Minor Wound Care For Diabetic Patients

Minor Wound Care For Diabetic Patients

Within the realm of nonprescription products and devices, several carry a specific warning against use on diabetic skin. The greatest concern is with salicylic acid, which acts to intentionally create a wound. Its ability to slowly erode epidermis is useful for minor problems such as warts, corns and calluses. However, all salicylic acid products carry a strict contraindication against use by diabetic patients. This warning should be extended to various corn and callus removal devices. These products present varying degrees of danger to diabetic patients. There are "pumice stones," a type of solid rock; some are attached to contoured handles. These rocks may even be labeled "beauty stones." The patient is encouraged to intentionally abrade the skin by rubbing it with the rock in a misguided attempt to remove rough skin. The fallacy is that skin (e.g., elbows and knees) roughens in response to trauma. Thus, abrasion with a rock is counterproductive at best, and could cause serious infection in the diabetic who uses it to reduce a corn or callus. Other products to be avoided resemble vegetable graters, and are either perforated metal plates attached to a handle, or are actual files. A final group is "corn planes" which appear to be hair removal razors, except the distal end has a curved razor blade in it. The patient is instructed to draw it across the skin, removing successive layers of epidermis, much as a dermatologist uses a dermatome to remove skin prior to transplantation. These graters, files and planes should be advised against, and the diabetic patient who contemplates their use must be cautioned most strongly to see a podiatrist or a physician instead. If a diabetic patient has an existing infection that is not located on the foot (e.g., folliculitis, carbuncle Continue reading >>

Medicated Foot Pads Could Pose Diabetics Significant Danger

Medicated Foot Pads Could Pose Diabetics Significant Danger

Diabetics commonly have corns and calluses on their feet, which are the result of abnormal skin pressure due to an underlying prominent bone that presses skin into a shoe in the case of a corn or the ground below in the case of a callus. These corns and calluses can either be simply a nuisance, or they can cause pain and discomfort. Unfortunately, these pressure areas can lead to skin wounds if the corn or callus is not kept thin, as the pressure from a thick callus can lead to death of the healthy skin below, leading to a diabetic ulcer. Since corns and callus care is so very important for diabetics, the need for proper treatment becomes vital in the effort to protect the skin of the foot from harm. Unfortunately, many diabetics go about this the wrong way, and cause more harm than good. Since diabetics often have poor sensation in the feet, the act of trying to shave one's own corns or calluses is obviously a poor choice, as it is too easy to accidentally cut into the flesh without feeling much pain, which can lead to an infection. However, another more dangerous treatment solution lurks innocently on pharmacy shelves, luring unsuspecting diabetics. Medicated corn pads may sound benign, but are actually quite dangerous to someone with skin at risk of harm, such as diabetics and those with poor circulation. These 'medicated' pads usually contain salicylic acid, which is anything but medicine. This acid is used legitimately to dissolve hard skin, often for treatment of warts and other skin lesions. While it can be used to dissolve callus tissue, the problem lies in how the acid solution is applied to the skin. Salicylic acid and similar compounds do not make a distinction between callus tissue and the surrounding healthy skin. When applied for a prolonged period of time Continue reading >>

Corn On Toe | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Corn On Toe | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Anyone had a corn on their toe Ive got one (well I think it's a corn) went to get some treatment from tesco n all the info in the back of the packet states not suitable for diabetics, spoke with the pharmacist who said I need to see my doctor, got an appointment on sat what treatment will they give me? Amy one any ideas? Not sure what treatment they will give you, but you've done the right thing getting the toe checked by your Dr, as diabetics we do have to be extra careful when it comes to our feet. My doctor has told me that the reason they mention diabetics should avoid pedicures or treatment like this is because cuts and infections can go unnoticed due to neuropathy, thus causing it to get much much worse before its noticed. Corns are caused by improperly fitting foot ware, so perhaps try switching up the shoes for a while, and due small bit of pumice stoning at home while being extra careful not to go to deep ? One of the causes of corns is poorly fitting footwear, but it is far from the only cause. My corn is caused by the way my foot locomotes when walking causing pressure at a certain point on the sole of my foot causing a corn. Footwear doesn't seem to have anything to do with it. I had a corn a few months ago, in the middle of my foot. My surgery booked me in with a podiatrist, although it took three or four weeks to get the appointment. He was good though, sorted the corn out no problem. It's helpful to see a foot specialist sometimes anyway, while I was there he checked my feet for signs of neuropathy (all healthy at the moment ), and gave me some general advice about keeping my feet in good condition. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nerve Pain: 10 Foot Care Tips To Protect Yourself

Diabetic Nerve Pain: 10 Foot Care Tips To Protect Yourself

Diabetes can mean double trouble for your feet. First, diabetes can reduce blood flow to your feet, depriving your feet of oxygen and nutrients. This makes it more difficult for blisters, sores, and cuts to heal. And second, the diabetic nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy can cause numbness in your feet. When you can't feel cuts and blisters, you're more likely to get sores and infections. If you don't notice or treat the sores, they can become deeply infected, and lead to amputation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can also cause sharp pain in your feet. You may become excruciatingly sensitive to the lightest touch, like the sheets on your bed. Fortunately, a little TLC goes a long way in preventing foot problems from diabetes. Look over both feet carefully every day, and be sure you check between all of your toes. Blisters and infections can start between your toes, and with diabetic neuropathy, you may not feel them until they've become irritated or infected. If a physical challenge keeps you from checking your own feet, ask a family member to help. Wash both of your feet briefly each day with warm -- not hot -- water. You may not be able to feel heat with your feet, so test the water with your hands first. Avoid soaking too long in water, since waterlogged sores have a harder time healing. Dry your feet right away, and remember to dry gently between all of your toes. It's an investment worth making. Even the slightest rubbing or misfit shoe can cause a blister that turns into a sore that becomes infected and never heals. Buy better-fitting shoes, or try different socks, even at the most minor signs of redness or irritation, since you may not be able to feel when it's getting worse. Before buying or putting on the shoes check your shoes for rough seams, sharp e Continue reading >>

Can I Use Over-the-counter Corn And Callus Removers?

Can I Use Over-the-counter Corn And Callus Removers?

Can I Use Over-the-Counter Corn and Callus Removers? If you notice a corn or callus on your foot, you might be tempted to use an over-the-counter medication to treat them. But you should not use these OTC products if you have diabetes. (Usually the productbox will say "not for use by people with diabetes".) Corn and callus removers, corn plasters and similar products are harsh chemicals, usually acids. They decrease the build-up of hard skin by softening and burning away the corn or callus. If you have diabetic nerve damage, you might not be able to feel it if the chemicals burned too much or got on the surrounding normal skin. Breaks in the skin can cause infection and difficulty with healing for a person with diabetes. Therefore, you should avoid putting harsh chemicals on your feet. You might try a green clay poultice to soften corns and calluses. Most important, try to determine whats causing them. The American Diabetes Association recommends that you see your regular provider or podiatrist if you have a corn or callus that needs to be treated. Reprinted from 101 Foot-Care Tips for People with Diabetes by Jessie H. Ahroni, PhD, ARNP, CDE. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. If you spend time on social media, why not get your diabetes tips there also? Lifescript has just launched a dedicated type 2 diabetes Facebook page that will offer diabetes tips, recipes, inspiration and more. Youll get advice, find friends, and discover solutions to everyday living. Come join us! Thanks for signing up for our newsletter! You should see it in your inbox very soon. Continue reading >>

How To Care For The Diabetic Foot, Holistic Health Information For Diabetics

How To Care For The Diabetic Foot, Holistic Health Information For Diabetics

Home / How to Care for The Diabetic Foot, Holistic Health Information for Diabetics How to Care for The Diabetic Foot, Holistic Health Information for Diabetics Diabetic Foot Care from Holistic Health Solutions Removing Special Foot Care Instructions Corn Removal, Correct Footwear Caring for the Diabetic foot Foot Ulcers, Corns, Calluses, Cold Feet and Other Foot Conditions. Learn the best way to smooth corns and calluses on the diabetic foot. Importart tips on how to protect your feet from hot and Learn tips on checking your feet, and tips for removal for corns and calluses. Under a physicians care, Diabin+ is safe and effective for those experiencing Diabetes Type I and Type II. It should not ever be considered a replacement for medical supervision and treatment. This formula is a special Advanced Nutraceutical medicine which supplements the bodys natural ability to use Insulin more efficiently as well as to use other energy sources when sugar-energies are erratic and are at a low. Caring for the Diabetic Foot Diabetes Selfcare Article Did you know diabetes is the fastest growing health problem in the United States and did you know more of You may be wondering what to do about corns and calluses on the diabetic foot? These frequently asked questions about diabetic footcare cover the best way to smooth corns and calluses on the diabetic foot. Smooth corns and calluses gently after bathing or showering, use a pumice stone to smooth corns and calluses. A pumice stone is a type of rock used to smooth the skin. After showering or bathing, your skin will be softer so it will be easier to do. Make sure to rub gently, and Only in one direction to avoid tearing your skin. Do not cut corns and calluses. That means if you were thinking of using a razor blade, corn plaster, or l Continue reading >>

Is It Ok For Diabetic To Use Corn Remover On Feet?

Is It Ok For Diabetic To Use Corn Remover On Feet?

I am a type 2 diabetic with an average hemoglobin A1C of 6.1. Would it be safe to use an over-the-counter liquid corn remover on my foot? Dear Brian: Thanks for your question. It's a wonderful opportunity to review what adult-onset or type 2 diabetics should be doing to prevent complications. Most family physicians and internal medicine specialists are qualified to care for uncomplicated type 2 diabetes. In addition to encouraging the patient to follow a strict diet in which carbohydrates are restricted and patients measure their blood sugar several times a day, we generally will do several other blood tests several times a year. For example, cholesterol and lipids are measured and abnormal levels treated. Kidney function tests are done to assess for damage. A hemoglobin A1C blood test is usually done every three to six months. The hemoglobin A1C is a measure of blood sugar control levels over the past three months or so. Less that 6.5 percent is good blood sugar control. That test also offers additional information beyond the measured blood sugars. Diabetics are at risk of diseases of the eye, kidney, nervous system and cardiovascular system. Keeping blood sugars in control decreases the risks of these diseases but does not decrease risk to zero. Every diabetic needs ongoing visits to a physician to handle general diabetes treatment, a podiatrist for foot care, an ophthalmologist for eye exams and a dentist to monitor for gum and tooth disease. Most physicians would strongly suggest that a diabetic patient see a podiatrist on a regular basis for routine foot care and for examinations. I suggest this even to those who have good control of their disease. Most diabetic patients should have their toenails professionally cut by a podiatrist or a pedicurist trained by a podi Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Corn Caps In Diabetics? (query)

How To Deal With Corn Caps In Diabetics? (query)

I am a diabetic and suffer from corns and calluses. As I need to take care of my foot, can I use corn caps? I have heard a lot about it. Do I need to change my footwear? What is the best way to deal with corn caps? Please help. The query is answered by Dr Sanjay Kalra – Consultant Endocrinologist, Bharti Hospital, Karnal & Vice President, South Asian Federation of Endocrine Societies. Dr Sanjay Kalra says, ‘Corn are associated with severe pain and hence, most people tend to pop a painkiller. However, always consult your doctor before popping a painkiller to get rid of a severe pain. Though the use of ointments to heal the skin condition is advised in some cases, the use of corn caps is not known to show any significant effect in relieving pain and treating corn and callus. Moreover, diabetics should ensure proper foot care and avoid using corn caps as it might aggravate the condition. Hence, it is wise to avoid the use of corn caps, if possible, for diabetics.’ The right footwear to deal with corn and calluses Did you know that different shoes have different stress pattern on the feet, like the balls of the feet are more prone to constant stress? Also, there are various pressure points on the soles of the feet, which are distributed all over and hence, constant pressure on any of these points increases your risk of corns and calluses. Also, read about 8-foot care tips diabetics must follow. First of all, it is important to wear comfortable footwear because if the footwear is too tight or loose, it can further worsen the condition. Also, taking your shoes on and off throughout the day is not a bad idea (if you have the scope to do so) as it will only help you to relieve the sore foot muscles and relax your feet. If you are experiencing severe pain due to corn or ca Continue reading >>

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