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Can Diabetics Use Beet Sugar?

Top 10 Questions About Sugar & Kombucha

Top 10 Questions About Sugar & Kombucha

Sugar is truly a wondrous, misunderstood building block of life. It is nature’s gasoline: real, honest and pure energy, and when delivered in an easily digestible form, incredibly efficient! And yet, is there a necessary-for-life substance in our society with which we have a more tortured relationship than sugar? How did we end up in such a BATTLE with something we desperately need to survive? I have some ideas, but as always, the answers to “how” are not as important as the answers to “what now?” Pounding candy bars and soda pop is a rite of childhood that is born directly from the needs of the body. Kids are growing and they need energy. That’s how horrible/wonderful products of my youth like FunDip or Pixy Sticks became my favorites. As I grew up, I started taking my alcohol with lots of sugar. Dessert was my favorite meal. Snacks took their toll. But then something funny happened on the way to the Kombucha Forum. As my Kombucha consumption became more regular, I noticed that my sugar cravings were decreasing. At the same time, the “sour” taste of the Booch dissipated and became more natural to my palate. As Kombucha slowly alkalized my blood, my body kicked those cravings completely. These days, my sugar cravings are entirely mental. Once I have dessert in front of me, I rarely eat more than a few bites. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is *strong* and doesn’t want anything to do with that insulin spike. This is one of the greatest Kombucha benefits I have experienced. That is why misgivings about Kombucha & Sugar are mostly misguided. Without the sugar, there is no fermentation, and without fermentation, there’s no good stuff to feed your body. So let’s ask Wiki before we get started. Hey Wiki, what’s sugar? Sugar is a term for a class o Continue reading >>

Beetroot And Diabetes.

Beetroot And Diabetes.

I want to know is beetroot beneficial or harmful in diabetes. Please share the experience. Thanks. I was advised by my Doc. that those who are confirmed having stone in the belly,small or big ,such persons should not take beetroot at all.This was advised for my wife a day before. K.Rangaswamy Beetroot Juice For Diabetic Patients Vegetable and fruit juices, packed with nutrients, are often considered an ideal item on any diet menu. Beetroot juice is also similarly replete with health boosting compounds and is ideal for diabetes. Beet root juice has a detoxifying effect on the body. This explains why a feeling of nausea is experienced when you start drinking beetroot juice on a daily basis. It is helpful to combine the juice of red beet with other vegetables like carrot, so that the body can get accustomed to it. A glass of beetroot juice can also ward off any signs of fatigue in the body. Its chlorine content proves good for the digestive system. At the same time, the nitrates in red beet help in lowering the blood pressure of your body, thus keeping hypertension off the limits. Read more on health benefits of beetroot juice Compared to consuming this vegetable, drinking the juice of red beets provides a sudden boost of ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenes, phenolic acids, and phytoestrogens to the body. This acts positively on the overall cardiac function. Drinking beetroot juice also introduces a greater concentration of potassium than when eating the vegetable. Hence, beetroot juice is often given for diabetes as this allays the formation of any stones in the kidneys or gallbladder. Devoid of any fat and rich in vitamins and natural sugars, beetroot juice is a good choice for excess weight management, which is essential in keeping diabetes in check. The benefits of bee Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers About Fructose

Questions And Answers About Fructose

What is fructose? Fructose is a monosaccharide, or single sugar, that has the same chemical formula as glucose but a different molecular structure. Sometimes called fruit sugar, fructose is found in fruit, some vegetables, honey, and other plants. Fructose and other sugars are carbohydrates, an important source of energy for the body. What other types of sugars are there? The food supply contains a variety of sugars called monosaccharides (single sugar units like fructose and glucose) and disaccharides (two monosaccharides linked together). Glucose is the main source of energy for the body because most complex sugars and carbohydrates break down into glucose during digestion. Starches contain many single sugar units linked together. The various sugars perform different functions in the body, but they all can provide energy. Sucrose is a disaccharide that contains equal parts of glucose and fructose. Known as table or white sugar, sucrose is found naturally in sugar cane and sugar beets. Other sugars in foods and beverages include: Lactose Disaccharide containing glucose and galactose Naturally occurring in milk Maltose Disaccharide containing two glucoses Crystallized from starch Dextrose Another name for glucose Crystallized from sugar cane, sugar beets and starches Corn Syrup Primarily single glucose units Produced from corn starch High Fructose Corn Syrup Primarily a mixture of glucose and fructose single units Produced from corn starch Is fructose safe? High fructose corn syrup and all other sugars are “generally recognized as safe” by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health, the National Academy of Sciences report Diet and Health, and Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objec Continue reading >>

Beet Pickled Eggs

Beet Pickled Eggs

Hi. I'm interested in making a couple of jars of beet pickled eggs. Recipes on the internet vary from 2 Tb. to 1 cup of sugar. Can Splenda, Stevia liquid, or Erithritol be used instead? Will the taste change much? Have you checked the low carb sites for pickled eggs? I'm sure they use a sugar substitute. When I pickle beets for dh (they don't play nice with my numbers), I use unseasoned rice wine vinegar and seasonings (no sugar or subs). Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. I suppose it would depend on which sweetener you like best. There are a couple recipes I saw online that used Stevia but I would assume any sweetener you like would be fine. My hubby just puts the hard boiled eggs in a jar of pickled beet juice--he's always preferred them that way. He'll eat the beets and save the juice for the eggs. But I just looked at the jar and although the carbs were fairly low for the serving of beets, the juice contains High Fructose Corn Syrup. I will have to get on him about that, lol. He's not diabetic and I don't eat them myself but I still put my foot down. The thread I mentioned made me think of the Mt. Olive s.f. pickles and that I have used the juice for various veggies (blanched). This only works if you want something that tastes like bread & butter pickles (not dill), but I have also put stuff in the dill jars. I have put extra dills into the bread & butter juice and it makes them sweet & sour. I frequently make pickled eggs. I use either white vinegar or rice vinegar, both of which are much milder than apple cider or red wine vinegar. Then I add "French's Mixed Pickling Spices" and the eggs. I don't use any sweetener. If you use one of the milder vinegars you won't need much, if any, sweetener. If you still want to add some sweetener, I'm su Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes – Using Alternative Sweeteners

Gestational Diabetes – Using Alternative Sweeteners

Whether we speak of Type 1, Type 2, or juvenile diabetes, we’re talking about the inability of insulin to convert sugar into energy. For some women, pregnancy hormones inhibit the production or function of insulin and results in gestational diabetes. Some people have a genetic family tendency toward diabetes. But for most of us, excess consumption of sugar and empty carbohydrates is at the heart of diabetic complications like heart disease, strokes, vision problems, kidney disease, nerve damage, or digestive issues. But sugar is more addictive than cocaine. Avoiding sugar in modern life means investigating every product’s ingredient list! Sugar is hidden everywhere—from foods to detergents to toothpaste. And it comes in many forms: Barbados sugar Barley malt Barley malt syrup Beet sugar Brown sugar Buttered syrup Cane juice Cane juice crystals Cane sugar Caramel Carob syrup Castor sugar Coconut palm sugar Coconut sugar Confectioner’s sugar Corn sweetener Corn syrup Corn syrup solids Date sugar Dehydrated cane juice Demerara sugar Dextrin Dextrose Evaporated cane juice Free-flowing brown sugars Fructose Fruit juice Fruit juice concentrate Glucose Glucose solids Golden sugar Golden syrup Grape sugar HFCS (High-Fructose Corn Syrup) Honey Icing sugar Invert sugar Malt syrup Maltodextrin Maltol Maltose Mannose Maple syrup Molasses Muscovado Palm sugar Panocha Powdered sugar Raw sugar Refiner’s syrup Rice syrup Saccharose Sorghum Syrup Sucrose Sugar (granulated) Sweet Sorghum Syrup Treacle Turbinado sugar Yellow sugar Have you ever tasted breastmilk? To complicate the sweet vs. healthy problem even more, humans are designed to like sweetness. With its combination of lactose + 30 oligosaccharides, breastmilk is sugary enough to make your sweet tooth ache! Parents are Continue reading >>

Sugars & Diabetes

Sugars & Diabetes

by Madelyn Wheeler and Marcia Levine Mazur Recently, "Diabetes Forecast" received a letter about a subject that concerns many people with diabetes: sugar. The writer wanted to know why a magazine for people with this disease would publish a recipe (March 1996, p. 34 "Coconut Pineapple Compote") that had 20 grams of sugars in one serving. It's an excellent question and one that "Forecast"would like to answer in print, not only for the writer, butfor all our readers who have similar "sugar" concerns. First, we agree. The sugar content in the recipe ishigh. But that's not the whole story. The sugars in the compote come mainly from the fructose(fruit sugar) in the pineapple, while a small percentagecomes from the lactose (milk sugar) found in the milk andyogurt. Clearly, many nutritious foods have some form of sugaror a combination of sugars in them. Fruits, in fact, areparticularly high in sugar. That means that virtually anyfruit we eat--if it had a food label--would list a largequantity of sugar on that label. (To be more scientific, itwould list most of its carbohydrates as sugar, but moreabout carbohydrates later.) If "Forecast" could not print recipes that contained alarge quantity of sugars--such as the 20 grams of sugars perserving in the Pineapple Compote--it could not print recipesthat had fruit in them. But "Forecast" does print such recipes, because sugars--when used appropriately--are not forbidden foods for peoplewith either type of diabetes. It's understandable that people with diabetes worrymore about sugar than about any other food. For centuries,sugar has been considered the enemy, the worst possiblething people with diabetes could ever consume. Why? The very name of the disease for one thing. Foryears diabetes mellitus was commonly referred to as "sugard Continue reading >>

Sugar Vs. High-fructose Corn Syrup: Is One Sweetener Worse For Your Health?

Sugar Vs. High-fructose Corn Syrup: Is One Sweetener Worse For Your Health?

High-fructose corn syrup has long been portrayed as a major villain in the American diet. But a new school of thought contends that plain old table sugar or even all-natural honey can be just as harmful to a person's health. Any source of excess sugar contributes to obesity and diabetes, and singling out high-fructose corn syrup might distract consumers from the real health hazards posed by any and all added sugars, many dietitians now say. For example, people swigging all-natural sodas sweetened with pure cane sugar are still doing themselves harm, just as if the sodas had been loaded instead with high-fructose corn syrup, said Mario Kratz, a research associate professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle. "The science is pretty clear that normal household sugar doesn't differ from high-fructose corn syrup," said Kratz, who specializes in nutrition and metabolism. "They are equally bad when consumed in sugar-sweetened beverages." Some researchers, such as Shreela Sharma, maintain that high-fructose corn syrup poses a unique health threat. They are concerned that the human body may process high-fructose corn syrup differently than regular sugar, in a way that contributes to obesity and its attendant problems, such as diabetes and heart disease. "In the end, sugar is sugar when it comes to calories, but it's not the same when your body is metabolizing these different sugars," said Sharma, a registered dietitian and associate professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. "To me, these small differences ultimately do end up making a big difference." But such views are now being challenged by other researchers and nutritionists who say that all sugars used in food are pretty much the same. High-fructose corn syrup i Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing works amazingly well for all sorts of conditions. It can help add nutrients, increase overall caloric intake, and helps stomach problems. But, can juicing really help diabetes? This is a question that we’re going to answer. For most people, they don’t have to worry too much about the finer details of juicing. They don’t have to worry about how many carbohydrates they take in, and can juice whatever they want to. Diabetics, on the other hand, have to be very concerned with a number of sugars they take in. And unfortunately, juicing tends to concentrate sugars. So, diabetics really need to pay attention to the type of juices they use and the quantity. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes the person to lose their pancreas function because of the autoimmune system attacks and destroys the islet cells that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes most often occurs between the ages of 4 and 10, but anyone can be affected by type 1 diabetes. This type of diabetes cannot be cured. Because type 1 diabetics do not have pancreas function or have very minimal pancreas function that’s declining, they have to rely on an external source of insulin. For every sugar molecule they take in, they have to inject a corresponding amount of insulin. We won’t go into how much insulin it takes because every person is different. So, when juicing, type 1 diabetics have to know how many sugars they will be taking in. That way, they can take an appropriate amount of insulin to metabolize the sugars. Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle condition that is caused by a person consuming too many sugars for too long. The pancreas has worked so hard for so long, that it is worn out. The over-consumption of sugars has also caused the body to become resistant to its own insulin and this Continue reading >>

The Real Difference Between Agave, Honey, And Other Natural Sweeteners

The Real Difference Between Agave, Honey, And Other Natural Sweeteners

In the never-ending, always-confusing battle of good versus bad foods, we may not be sure where wheat and saturated fats stand today, but there's one thing we would all probably agree on: Sugar is the devil. And since we love our sweets (in fact, humans innately crave sweet flavors), it would be best to ban the white stuff and appease our appetites with so-called “natural” sweeteners. It makes sense if you believe the hype: Some of these sugar substitutes have vitamins and minerals; others prevent the roller-coaster blood sugar response that's typical of sugar; and—of course—all of them are natural! So they've got to be better for you. Except that they're still sweeteners—and many of those “health benefits” are minuscule (at best) at the doses you should be eating. Plus, not everything works in every recipe (go ahead and try sweetening coffee with whole dates). Let's break down some of the most common types of natural sweeteners so you can decide what's best for you. What it is: Since it doesn't undergo bleaching and some other processing, sugar in the raw is darker in color and has a richer, more caramel-like flavor than table sugar. Best uses: Anywhere you’d use white sugar at a one-to-one ratio. Is it better for you? Less processing also means it retains tiny amounts of minerals like calcium and iron—but there’s less than a milligram of either in a teaspoon, says culinary nutritionist Rachel Begun, R.D.N. Like white sugar, that teaspoon also comes with 16 calories, and both sweeteners are made by boiling and evaporating cane sugar juice to form solid sugar crystals, so your body processes them in the same way, Begun says. What it is: A syrup derived from the agave plant (yup, the same one that’s used to make tequila). It’s about as sweet as ho Continue reading >>

Home Baking And Diabetes

Home Baking And Diabetes

Since The Great British Bake Off hit our TV screens, it seems everyone has been rediscovering the pleasuresof home baking. Having diabetes doesnt mean you have to miss out. In fact, home baking is ideal for people withdiabetes. Unlike shop-bought baked products, which may contain lots of added sugar and unhealthy fats, you can make your baking healthier as youre in charge of what goes into themix. Search for 'baking & desserts' in our recipe finder for some healthier bakes you can try. All are nutritionally analysed so you'll have the precise calculations of carbs, fat and sugar to help with insulin management and weight control. So, whether you're a confident baker or just starting out, why not have a go? Wholemeal flour is healthier than white and can help with gut and heart health. It's morefilling than white, processed flour, so a smaller portion satisfies for longer. It works in mostrecipes, but if you find it a bit heavy for things like sponge cakes, try using a ratio of 30:70 or50:50 wholemeal flour to plain flour. Mashed banana or pured apple can be beaten with a little sugar and rapeseed oil to createa similar effect to creaming butter without the extra saturated fat from butter. It also addsnatural sweetness. The key is to beat it well, which helps add air to the mixture. Add fresh fruit grated or finely chopped apples, pears, blueberries, blackberries, orchopped peaches and nectarines all add flavour and natural sweetness. Add vegetables finely grate and add to a cake mixture. Courgettes, carrots and beetrootwork well and soften once cooked, adding moisture without overpowering flavour. Add porridge oats reducing flour and replacing it with the same weight of oats also addssoluble fibre, which can help lower cholesterol, and help promote good blood glucoseco Continue reading >>

Ask The Experts: Canned Beetroot

Ask The Experts: Canned Beetroot

Q: "I notice that all canned beetroot seems to have sugar in it. I drain the liquid off and replace it with my own sugar-free variety. Will the canned beetroot have absorbed a significant amount of the sugar used in its processing or is it likely that my 'system' will make it safe for a diabetic to use regularly?" Jessie A: Nutritionist Claire Turnbull replies: "A serving of beetroot (say two slices or around 60g) contains the same amount of carbohydrate as half a slice of bread. Beetroot is perfectly okay for people with diabetes, provided the carbohydrate is included as part of your normal daily allowance. With diabetes, although it is helpful to limit the amount of sugar in your diet to help manage your blood sugars, it is equally important to look at the total amount of carbohydrate (starches and sugars) that you are eating every day. Beetroot is a root vegetable which is about 10g carbohydrate/100g, of which most is naturally occurring sugar. Canned varieties may contain added sugar in the liquid, but when they are drained, are only slightly higher in sugar at around 11g/100g so it’s not a huge concern.” Continue reading >>

Dogs And Sugar: Good Or Bad?

Dogs And Sugar: Good Or Bad?

Dogs have taste buds that react to sweets just as we do. This means dogs tend to be attracted to sweets, just like us. In addition to enjoying the taste of sweet foods, dogs can also suffer from sugar addiction just like us. When sugar is consumed, the nucleus accumbens area of the brain releases dopamine which makes us feel good. When sugar is consumed often and in increasing amounts, less dopamine is released, and to get that good feeling, more sugar needs to be consumed. In other words, sugar is addicting. We share more than just sugar addiction with our dogs, though. Unfortunately, dogs can also suffer the same harmful effects of sugar consumption: diabetes, obesity, dental problems, and more. This discussion is about sugars or sweeteners that are added to your dog’s foods or treats. It’s not about the sugars naturally found in carbohydrates that might be in your dog’s daily diet. When you share an apple slice with your dog, for example, that contains fructose. Those naturally occurring sugars can be the basis of another discussion. Right now, let’s talk about added sugars. Dog Foods Often Contain Sugar It might surprise you to know that many dog foods contain sugar. Sugar in the food can mask the bitter taste of some other ingredients, can make the food more palatable and changes the texture of the food. Most importantly to many dog food manufacturers, however, is that adding sugar to the food creates an addiction to a particular brand of food. After all, if your dog wants to eat one brand of food (and only that brand), then you’ll buy it over and over again. Plus, when dogs become addicted to dog foods containing sugar, it can be difficult to convince the dog to eat a healthier food or a food without the added sugar. Sugar is Added to Many Dog Treats Ove Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Beat Your Sugar Addiction

8 Ways To Beat Your Sugar Addiction

In the world of fantasy wish lists, wouldn't it be great if—instead of prompting us to snack all the time—our bodies would just use up fat we have already stored? One major reason this doesn't happen has to do with our diets. When you consume starch and refined sugar, these foods enter the bloodstream quickly, causing a sugar spike. Your body then produces the hormone insulin to drive that sugar from your bloodstream into cells. But over time, excessive levels of insulin can make your muscle cells lose sensitivity to the hormone, leading to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Your fat cells are another story: They always remain sensitive. Insulin spikes lock fat into them, so you can't use it for energy. How do you break this cycle and get your body to work optimally again? Happily, you don't need to go on an extreme diet. The first step is just to reduce the blood sugar spikes that produce sharp increases of insulin. The substance in our diet that's most responsible for these surges is starch—namely, anything made from potatoes, rice, flour, corn, or other grains. (Think pasta, lasagna, white bread, doughnuts, cookies, and cakes.) You could cut out these foods entirely. But wouldn't it be great if there were a way to solve the problem without completely eliminating these carbs? It turns out there is. You can blunt the blood sugar-raising effects by taking advantage of natural substances in foods that slow carbohydrate digestion and entry into the bloodstream. No matter what kind of sugar blocker you use, your waistline (and health) will win in the end. Have a fatty snack 10 to 30 minutes before your meals. Reason: You remain fuller longer. At the outlet of your stomach is a muscular ring, the pyloric valve. It regulates the speed at which food leaves your stomach Continue reading >>

Beetroot For Diabetes

Beetroot For Diabetes

Beetroot is a naturally occurring root vegetable that is commonly found in the temperate and tropical regions. It is also extremely low in calories, specifically 36 calories per 100 gm of beet. As a result, the juicy vegetable has been widely accepted at dining tables owing to its low calorie and high nutritive content. Small to moderate helpings of beet root are sufficient to provide all the vitamins, minerals, flavonoids, and fiber of the vegetable. The pigments, namely, betacyanins, account for the red color of sugar beets, and beta carotene is the antioxidant that is found in abundance in beetroot leaves. The root is also rich in vitamin C, fiber, and potassium. 1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 2 3 Foods to Keep Out Is This Why Your Stomach Has Digestive Problems? nucific.com High in proteins, fiber, and essential nutrients, beetroot has a glycemic index of 64, which is in the medium range. Although the vegetable is high in naturally occurring sugars, the rate of its conversion to glucose is considerably low. This avoids any sudden surge of glucose levels in the blood stream. Beetroot is also considered effective in the reduction of hemocysteine, which can lead to chronic ailments in the heart and other organs. The presence of betaine in beetroot accounts for its high medicinal value. Betaine also helps in mitigating fatty deposits in the body. This ensures that the onset of type-2 diabetes can be allayed for those who regularly consume the red beet. Beetroot, in its raw form, is considered better for diabetic patients. This is due to its high level of natural sugars. Beetroot is included in a diabetes menu plan if it can be had in the form of salads during any meal. Beetroot is best eat Continue reading >>

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