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Can Diabetics Take Protein Supplements

Eating Whey Protein Before Breakfast Could Prevent Diabetes: Substance Used By Bodybuilders Helps To Stop Blood Sugar Levels Spiking From Food

Eating Whey Protein Before Breakfast Could Prevent Diabetes: Substance Used By Bodybuilders Helps To Stop Blood Sugar Levels Spiking From Food

Protein shakes are the go-to item for bodybuilders. But new research suggests they could have benefits for the general population too - not just those looking to bulk up. Eating whey protein, which can be bought as a powder to be made into a smoothie, before breakfast could help to prevent type 2 diabetes, scientists claim. The substance, also found in milk and cheese, additionally improved blood sugar levels in a small study on obese men with the condition. Researchers from Newcastle University conducted two studies to assess the effects of whey protein. Their first experiment involved giving 12 obese men either a 30 minute rest or a light treadmill session for the same time frame, The Diabetes Times reports. The participants were then either given 20g of the supplement or a placebo before consuming a carbohydrate-filled breakfast. Blood sugar levels, which normally spike after eating, were found to be controlled as a result of the whey protein. In the second study, 11 men suffering from type 2 diabetes were given 15g of the supplement. And in the findings, which were presented at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference, they found their blood sugars were kept under control. They were also found to be more full, helping to curb their desire to have a snack before lunch. Study author Dr Daniel West told the news website: 'We know that high blood glucose levels after eating can contribute to poor blood glucose management and can also be detrimental to cardiovascular health. 'We’ve shown that consuming small amount of whey protein before a meal could help people avoid those high blood glucose levels and may help them to feel more satisfied after mealtimes.' This comes after research in October found that drinking a protein supplement could help to reduce the risk of hea Continue reading >>

Protein Powder For Diabetes – Supplements

Protein Powder For Diabetes – Supplements

Doctors and dieticians around the world now advise the diabetic patient to include protein powders in their diet. Why? Because protein is what the body wants and it is the safest bet for prolonged health. The human body naturally turns to proteins when faced with low glucose levels. The protein contained in the muscles is broken down into amino acids to be converted into glucose by the liver. So, protein powders are the natural way to sustain the glucose levels in a diabetic. A research done in 2011 by Heather Leidy, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology at the University of Missouri brought forth some interesting facts. One was that consuming a protein-rich meal suppresses the regions in the brain responsible for food cravings and the motivational drive to eat. This is added good news for diabetics as one of the most constant problems for diabetics is hunger. Protein powder is an easy to use alternative for snacks. While travelling, one can easily carry them and consume at will. Protein powders are preferred over other types of nutrients to meet the dietary requirements and sustain steady glucose levels in a diabetic because these are the safest with minimum problems over longer periods of time. Carbohydrates and fats cause many problems for the diabetic including organ damage. A carbohydrate rich diet can result in uncontrolled blood sugar levels causing diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy and kidney failure in course of time. A fat rich diet may increase incidences of atherosclerosis, large vessel disease and cardiac complications. Diabetes: Incidence and Types Diabetes, as we know, is a condition in which glucose absorption becomes impaired due to low insulin hormone production from pancreas. The result is glucose is not abs Continue reading >>

Are Meal Replacement Drinks For You?

Are Meal Replacement Drinks For You?

If it seems like a hassle to figure out the difference between calories and carbs, or saturated and unsaturated fats, meal replacement drinks might seem like a tempting solution. Promoted as a tasty, all-in-one source of nutrition, they are easy to consume on the go. And the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada recommended them for the first time in the 2013 edition, noting that substituting them for regular food at one to two meals per day can help people with type 2 diabetes lose weight—and improve their blood glucose (sugar) levels as a result. But you might also reach for them if you are regularly eating on the run and find yourself with limited options for nourishment. “A lot of people struggle with what to eat, especially if they haven’t prepared food in advance. Their selection is often what’s fast and nearby,” says Joanne Lewis, diabetes education manager for the CDA. “Often those food choices could be higher in calories than what you’d get in a meal replacement drink.” “Meal replacement drinks are not an excuse to eat without a plan. Ideally, people should plan proper meals and use food as their main source of nutrition.” – Joanne Lewis, diabetes education manager, Canadian Diabetes Association No substitute for meal planning With set amounts of carbohydrates, protein, fat, and fibre all ready to go in a pre-portioned container or easy-to-measure mix, these drinks can give people with diabetes the key nutrients they need to stay energized and keep their blood sugar levels steady. But, Lewis cautions, “it’s not like you can just replace food with a meal replacement drink and forget about meal planning. If you’re going to replace food with one of these Continue reading >>

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Diabetes has become one of the most serious health risks in the world today! According to the CDC, it's estimated that 29.1 million people in the U.S. suffer from diabetes. That's nearly 10% of the U.S. population! Roughly 1 in 3 adults (86 million people) suffers from pre-diabetes, and anywhere from 15 to 30% of those adults will develop full-on diabetes within 5 years. The mortality rate among diabetic adults is 50% higher than non-diabetics. The health complications of diabetes can be pretty terrifying to consider: heart disease, loss of limbs, strokes, kidney failure, and blindness. If you want to reduce your risk of diabetes, there are three things that will work: 1. Lose weight -- Obesity increases your risk of diabetes, as the excess body fat reduces your body's sensitivity to insulin. This causes your blood sugar levels to spike out of control. If the high blood sugar levels persist, over time it can lead to diabetes. By losing weight, you essentially increase insulin sensitivity, making it easier for your body to control blood sugar levels. 2. Do exercise -- Exercise helps to promote weight loss, but it also uses up the glucose (sugar in your blood). This helps to keep your blood sugar levels under control, preventing excessively high blood sugar that causes diabetes. Even just 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day is enough to drastically reduce your risk of diabetes. 3. Change your diet -- This is one of the most important lifestyle changes, and one of the easiest. A healthy morning breakfast diet includes a balance between fats, carbs, and protein, a reduction in sugar and salt intake, and plenty of raw foods. Almost any balanced, calorie-controlled diet will work wonders to control your blood sugar level and reduce your risk of diabetes. As you change up Continue reading >>

Protein Powder For Diabetes

Protein Powder For Diabetes

“Is taking whey protein powder good or bad for people with type 2 diabetes?” This was a correspondent’s recent question. I told him that this is such a good question that I would answer him here. Many people supplement their protein intake with a daily scoop or two of protein powder. Years ago I did that myself. We have a wide variety of types and brands of protein powder to chose from. Besides whey protein, we can get casein, soy, and egg white protein powder from many vendors. Some years ago I decided that using the most complete protein was the best idea. I discovered that egg protein powder was the most complete. That means it has the best balance of the nine essential amino acids that comprise protein. One way to check this is to consult NutritionData.com. This comprehensive nutrition website rates foods in many respects, including “protein quality.” An amino acid score of 100 or more indicates a complete or high-quality protein, based on the recommendations of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. NutritionData’s report for whole dried eggs awards it an amino acid score of 131, the highest such score I can find for any food. Its amino acid report for dried egg whites is also high, 125. Whey is also a high quality protein, scoring 102 for sweet dried whey and 109 for acid dried whey. But a separate NutritionData score for a food’s inflammation factor indicates that whey and whole dried egg is inflammatory, while dried egg whites are anti-inflammatory. So, for several years I would make an egg white protein powder drink every day. Until I realized that I was already getting too much protein in my diet. Like other men, I need just 56 grams of complete protein per day, according to the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Med Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Weight training can be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When individuals hear the term "bodybuilding," they automatically think of competitive bodybuilding. In all reality, this is just one very small sector of a large subset of the population who weight trains (e.g., body builds) for general aesthetics and health. Weight training itself can also be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A Brief Background About Diabetes The rate of diabetes is soaring at an unthinkable level in North America. This increase is related to the obesity epidemic in this country; diabetes is one of the many diseases associated with obesity. There Are Two Main Types Of Diabetes: Type I Type II In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas (organ responsible for insulin production) completely stops producing insulin. Insulin is the hormone necessary to use glucose (sugar) found in foods for energy. Therefore, individuals with type 1 diabetes must take insulin shots. This usually develops in children between the ages of 8 to 12, but can develop at any age. I'm aware of one woman who developed type I diabetes in her mid 50's. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented; it is an autoimmune disease that ultimately results in the cells of the pancreas which produce insulin to stop functioning. On the contrary, type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to produce and/or unable to properly use insulin. This accounts for about 90% of the t Continue reading >>

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whether you are looking to kick start your current weight loss plan or gain muscle in the gym, protein powders can very helpful. However, if you are diabetic you need to take extra care when choosing a protein powder. Ensuring that the supplement you choose fits with your current lifestyle and dietary needs is very important. Read on to find out exactly what the best protein powder for diabetics is. Who Are Protein Powders Designed For? There are a number of protein powders available, all of which are usually marketed for specific uses. For example, you can find protein for weight loss, powders for bulking up and gaining muscle and meal replacements. Traditionally though, most people tend to use protein powder as a post workout shake in order to aid their fitness goals. The Benefits Of Protein Powder Protein Powder Aids Weight Loss While Preserving Muscle If you are starting a serious weight loss program, especially if you’re attempting to improve or reverse the effects of type 2 diabetes, following a very low calorie diet (VLCD) is a good plan. Programs such as the blood sugar diet can be a great way to lose weight fast. One thing to be careful of is that restricting calories to this level can cause your body to break down muscle as you workout while it attempts to hold onto your fat stores. Drinking a protein shake post workout can help preserve muscle and burn more calories. Protein Powder Controls Hunger If you are trying your best to complete a weight loss program, constantly feeling hungry can be a huge obstacle. However, research has shown that drinking shakes with 50 grams of whey protein can reduce the hormones which tell the brain you’re hungry for up to four hours (source). Protein Powder Can Help You Beat Stress If you are feeling stressed, run down and Continue reading >>

How Whey Protein Helps Weight Loss & Type 2 Diabetes

How Whey Protein Helps Weight Loss & Type 2 Diabetes

Whey protein offers tremendous metabolic advantages for healthy people as well as those who are struggling to improve their metabolism. This article reviews the latest findings on how whey protein assists weight loss and type 2 diabetes, based on a recent scientific article. Whey is far more than simply “grams of protein.” The protein itself is composed of bioactive peptides: β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, proteose peptone, immunoglobulins, bovine serum albumin, lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase. The whey protein used for food supplementation is a byproduct of the cheese making industry, thus it also contains glycomacropeptides (GMPs), which are produced by enzymatic reactions. Whey protein is an excellent source of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). As whey protein is digested it produces additional bioactive peptides, many of which help circulation or immunity. Many mechanisms are in play and contribute to the wide range of benefits from whey protein consumption. Whey Protein Boosts Metabolic Rate Dietary protein is well known to exert a higher level of metabolic activity compared to fats or carbohydrates. This food based thermogenic is important to overall metabolism. Whey protein has been shown to be a superior metabolic activator, much better than the other dairy protein (casein) or soy. Because whey protein contains 50 percent - 75 percent more leucine than other proteins it has a much more dynamic ability to stimulate muscle metabolism. In higher amounts whey protein stimulates an important gene signaling system called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). mTOR is central to your body building up its structure via protein synthesis, including muscles, joints, and bone. Because whey protein is so easy to absorb compared to other proteins, its higher surg Continue reading >>

Can You Have Protein Supplements Or Powders If You Are Suffering From Diabetes?

Can You Have Protein Supplements Or Powders If You Are Suffering From Diabetes?

For people suffering from diabetes, there are too many diet rules and restrictions to follow. This makes one think twice before picking up anything labelled as healthy, even the protein supplements or powders. Many diabetics wonder if they are good for them. Remember, unlike protein from food, protein powders and supplements that are available in the markets are loaded with sugar and other added chemicals, which might have an adverse effect on one’s sugar levels. Here is a gym beginner’s guide to whey and other supplements. But if you are going to the gym to keep your blood sugar level in control, you need to pay attention to your protein requirements. Proteins help to rebuild and repair the muscles you damage in the gym. This is the reason why a protein rich snack is advised post workout and the most favourable ones are either the supplements or powders that readily make into a shake. However, if you are a diabetic, you need to spare some thoughts before investing in one. ‘There are protein supplements available in the markets that are sugar-free, titrated for diabetics and are safe to drink,’ says Dr Niti Shah diabetologist, Advanced Multispecialty Hospital, Mumbai. So, if you have diabetes pick up the right one after a consultation either with your doctor or a nutritionist. Here are seven gym-safe rules for diabetics to follow. Here are a few things that you need to keep in mind if you plan to have protein supplements post workout: If you are a diabetic, the ideal post workout snack should be a mix of complex carbohydrates and proteins. Since there would be a dip in sugar levels post workout, complex carbohydrates that release energy slowly would help to regulate blood sugar levels. Protein supplement, on the other hand, would help to repair the damaged muscl Continue reading >>

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Go to: Abstract A cost-effective nutritional approach to improve postprandial glycaemia is attractive considering the rising burden of diabetes throughout the world. Whey protein, a by-product of the cheese-making process, can be used to manipulate gut function in order to slow gastric emptying and stimulate incretin hormone secretion, thereby attenuating postprandial glycaemic excursions. The function of the gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, particularly during the postprandial period, and this review will discuss the mechanisms by which whey protein slows gastric emptying and stimulates release of gut peptides, including the incretins. Whey protein is also a rich source of amino acids, and these can directly stimulate beta cells to secrete insulin, which contributes to the reduction in postprandial glycaemia. Appetite is suppressed with consumption of whey, due to its effects on the gut-brain axis and the hypothalamus. These properties of whey protein suggest its potential in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal dose and timing of whey protein ingestion are yet to be defined, and studies are required to examine the long-term benefits of whey consumption for overall glycaemic control. Keywords: Whey protein, Postprandial glycaemia, Type 2 diabetes, Dietary intervention, Preload, Gastric emptying, Incretins, Gut hormones, Appetite, Amino acids Core tip: Whey protein, a by-product of cheese-manufacture, shows promise in the dietary management of diabetes. Whey can slow gastric emptying, stimulate insulin and gut hormones including the incretins, and thereby reduce postprandial blood glucose, especially when consumed some minutes before a meal. Whey may also suppress appetite and reduce food intake. This review will sum Continue reading >>

Muscle Milk: Side Effects And Benefits

Muscle Milk: Side Effects And Benefits

Muscle Milk Side Effects Muscle Milk is a relatively new protein product that basically has the usual side effects that many proteins have including things like: Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Nausea But probably the biggest unwanted effect of muscle milk is the cost. Sure, it has a lot of bells and whistles, but Muscle Milk is really a combination between a quick release protein like whey protein, a slower release protein, and medium chain triglyceride fats for energy. The reason why I was first intrigued by Muscle Milk was because the producers of Muscle Milk claimed that they designed it after actual human mother's milk. This surprised me because babies often build large stores of fat that stay with them for many months after they're finished breastfeeding. Yet Muscle Milk claims the opposite, that it promotes efficient fat burning and lean muscle growth. Muscle Milk in fact has around 330 calories according to GNC and one of the Muscle Milk side effects is unwanted weight gain due to high calorie intake and not enough fat burning. G-amine, which is one of the ingredients used in Muscle Milk has been shown to elevate levels of a compound known as homocysteine in the blood. This has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. In addition to this, people suffering from diabetes should be careful when considering Muscle Milk because of the L-Glutamate that's used in Muscle Milk, because it can have some unpredictable effects on blood sugar. Another reported Muscle Milk side effect is bloating and gas. This is because of a compound called Crystalline Fructose, which is the main ingredient in Muscle Milk. There have also been reports that one of the Muscle Milk side effects is an adverse effect on the reproductive system. I've been doing a lot of research to find out if Continue reading >>

Muscle Building Supplement For Diabetic Patients

Muscle Building Supplement For Diabetic Patients

Most of the people think that those who suffered from diabetes cannot workout or take muscle building supplements like others but having diabetes is not a problem for you if you want to build your muscles. But the diabetic patients have to follow some precautions and when it comes to gaining muscles. Strong muscles more efficiently collect nutrients and oxygen from the blood as compared to weak ones, which means any physical activity you can do, will put less strain and cardiac work on your heart. This will also good for the heart as they also improve weight control and to the hormone insulin it helps the body to remain sensitive. Here are some tips and muscle building supplements that help you to build lean and strong muscles without affecting your diabetes. Load up on Protein or Protein Bars: For healthy muscle building and muscle growth, protein intake is vital. Protein of your body is constantly drains and reserves for other uses like producing the hormones that result in less protein available for the building of muscles. As you body breaks down old proteins, you need to store and build new proteins faster. Those who are suffering from diabetes can consume protein about 1 gram per pound of the body, which is roughly the maximum amount of protein that your body can use in a day. Good sources of protein as a muscle building supplement for diabetic patients are Tuna, chicken, milk, eggs, cottage cheese and protein shakes. Protein bars is also a healthy muscle building supplement for diabetic patients. As most of the protein bars are high in sugar and saturated fats to overcome the taste of healthy ingredients. However, there are also some proteins bars available that contain low-sugar and low-fat which may not significantly impact your level of blood glucose. Proteins Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Use Protein Supplements Like Whey Protein?

Can Diabetics Use Protein Supplements Like Whey Protein?

Yes of course. But you need to be aware of the quality of whey used in your supplement. For example whey protein comes in the form of concentrates and isolates. The whey concentrates usually has protein content ranging from 30% all the way up to 80%. The rest of the product is usually simple sugar (lactose/sucrose) and fat. Whey isolates on the other hand usually have 90% or more protein content and hence the carb/fat content is very low. So you get the idea. A small scoop of 10 grams of your supplement could be holding anywhere between 0.5g to 5g of sugar. So make it a point to carefully read the calorie chart and take a call. Plug: We manufacture protein bars under the brand name HYP. And we have a diabetic friendly range in our portfolio which has been formulated with a blend of whey and milk proteins. Continue reading >>

Best Whey Protein Powder For Diabetics

Best Whey Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whey protein has a ton of health benefits, even though most people immediately associate it with the health and fitness realm. And, within that application, there’s a good reason for its popularity: Whey protein has been shown to encourage an overall healthy body composition – meaning it helps to builds lean muscle and reduce fat. The popular powder, though, has plenty of other uses. For one thing, whey can be extremely useful to diabetics. How? Is there a particular type of whey protein they should look for? The Benefits of Whey Protein for Diabetics The first thing to consider when discussing whey protein and diabetes is the fact that whey is a high protein food. This also means that it is naturally low in carbohydrates. Considered together, these nutritional facts mean that whey has a very low glycemic index (meaning that it will have little effect on insulin levels) and will still be a filling food. In general, this places whey within the bounds of the type of foods usually recommended for diabetics. But, recent research has found yet another reason for diabetics to use whey: the powder can actually reduce the severity of an insulin response even after a meal that would normal cause a massive spike. In the study, 15 subjects with type 2 diabetes took 50 grams of whey 30 minutes before eating a high glycemic index meal and had their blood tested periodically before and after the meal. The team of researchers found that, after drinking whey, the insulin response was reduced by 28 percent. Clearly, whey could (and should) have a place in a healthy eating plan to control diabetes. Other Considerations for Whey Protein Powders & Diabetes Unfortunately, not all whey protein powders are the same. Many have been loaded with other ingredients – including sweeteners. As Continue reading >>

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Diabetes SpectrumVolume 13 Number 3, 2000, Page 132 Marion J. Franz, MS, RD, LD, CDE In Brief People with diabetes are frequently given advice about protein that has no scientific basis. In addition, although weight is lost when individuals follow a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, there is no evidence that such diets are followed long-term or that there is less recidivism than with other low-calorie diets. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are in poor metabolic control may have increased protein requirements. However, the usual amount of protein consumed by people with diabetes adequately compensates for the increased protein catabolism. People with diabetes need adequate and accurate information about protein on which to base their food decisions. In the United States, ~16% of the average adult consumption of calories is from protein, and this has varied little from 1909 to the present.1 Protein intake is also fairly consistent across all ages from infancy to older age. A daily intake of 2,500 calories contributes ~100 g of protein—about twice what is needed to replace protein lost on a daily basis. Excess amino acids must be converted into other storage products or oxidized as fuel. Therefore, in theory, the excess ingested protein could, through the process of gluconeogenesis, produce glucose. This would mean that 100 g of protein could produce ~50 g of glucose. This has been the basis of the statement that if about half of ingested protein is converted to glucose, protein will have one-half the effect of carbohydrate on blood glucose levels. However, this belief has been challenged.2-4 Protein controversies exist either because research has not provided conclusive answers or because professionals are not aware of the research. This article will review Continue reading >>

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