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Can Diabetics Take Probiotics

One Of Your Favorite Snacks Might Reduce Your Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

One Of Your Favorite Snacks Might Reduce Your Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

You already know the importance of eating a healthy diet now that you're nourishing your growing baby. And now, with the publication of a recent study, you may have an excuse to snack on more yogurt: It turns out, the probiotics might reduce your risk of developing gestational diabetes (GDM), a condition which affects nearly one in 10 expecting women. What the study looked at A number of previous studies have found that probiotics may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Experts think that might be because these good bacteria help boost your gut microbiome (the viruses and bacteria that make up a huge portion of the cells in your body), reducing inflammation and helping your body more efficiently process glucose. So researchers in New Zealand focused on pregnant women, giving 187 a daily pill with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (a type often found in infant formula) and 189 a placebo pill containing no probiotics. The study was double-blind, meaning neither the researchers nor the women knew who got the probiotic and who got the placebo. Women started taking the pill every day between 14 to 16 weeks of pregnancy, and they were tested for gestational diabetes between 24 to 30 weeks of pregnancy. What the study found Overall, women who were at greater risk of a GDM diagnoses — those 35 or older and/or who had GDM in a previous pregnancy — were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. And using the New Zealand definition for gestational diabetes (which has a lower threshold for diagnoses than other international standards), the women who took the probiotic supplements were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with GDM — at 2.1 percent versus 6.5 percent of the women taking placebo. What this means for you Taking steps to p Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes. Can I Take Friendly Bacteria?

I Have Diabetes. Can I Take Friendly Bacteria?

Maybe this is a question you are used to hearing from your diabetic customers. No evidence exists to suggest that people with diabetes should not take probiotics. Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that compromises the body's production of insulin. Type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) usually occurs in younger individuals, and makes up less than 15% of all cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes (insulin-resistant diabetes) is much more common, and tends to affect people over the age of 30. Research into probiotics and their effects on patients with diabetes remains relatively sparse. Many people believe that probiotics can be beneficial for diabetics, as probiotic bacteria can improve immunity and should therefore help to correct autoimmune diseases such as diabetes. Furthermore some evidence suggests that the use of probiotics may lower the risk of contracting diabetes in the first instance, by supporting immunity and helping the body to maintain a healthy weight. Research on probiotics and Type 2 diabetes suggests that probiotics can help weight control in patients who are insulin-resistant. There is very little research into Type 1 diabetes and probiotics, but no evidence exists to suggest that probiotics should not be taken. Although we don’t add sugar as a sweetener to any of our products, diabetics should also note that a small amount of fructose is present in ‘Bifidobacteria & fibre’ (formerly known as ‘For maintaining regularity’). There is just 1.6g of fructose in each sachet (by comparison, an average apple has about 10g of fructose), but diabetics may need to factor this into their daily intake of carbohydrate, especially if taking multiple sachets each day. The fructose is present to ensure an even distribution of the bacteria and prebiotic fibr Continue reading >>

Biotech Bacteria Could Help Diabetics

Biotech Bacteria Could Help Diabetics

Genetically engineered gut bacteria trigger insulin production in mice. Friendly gut microbes that have been engineered to make a specific protein can help regulate blood sugar in diabetic mice, according to preliminary research presented last week at the American Chemical Society conference in Washington, D.C. While the research is still in the very early stages, the microbes, which could be grown in yogurt, might one day provide an alternative treatment for people with diabetes. The research represents a new take on probiotics: age-old supplements composed of nonharmful bacteria, such as those found in yogurt, that are ingested to promote health. Thanks to a growing understanding of these microbes, a handful of scientists are attempting to engineer them to alleviate specific ailments. “The concept of using bacteria to help perform (or fix) human disorders is extremely creative and interesting,” wrote Kelvin Lee, a chemical engineer at the University of Delaware, in Maryland, in an e-mail. “Even if it does not directly lead to a solution to the question of diabetes, it opens up new avenues of thought in a more general sense,” says Lee, who was not involved in the research. People with type 1 diabetes lack the ability to make insulin, a hormone that triggers muscle and liver cells to take up glucose and store it for energy. John March, a biochemical engineer at Cornell University, in Ithaca, NY, and his collaborators decided to re-create this essential circuit using the existing signaling system between the epithelial cells lining the intestine and the millions of healthy bacteria that normally reside in the gut. These epithelial cells absorb nutrients from food, protect tissue from harmful bacteria, and listen for molecular signals from helpful bacteria. “If Continue reading >>

Could Probiotics Ease Your Diabetes? Gut-improving Bacteria Could Reduce Disease Risk

Could Probiotics Ease Your Diabetes? Gut-improving Bacteria Could Reduce Disease Risk

The average healthy adult has around 100 trillion bacteria living in their gut, but should people we really believe the experts who tell us we need to take supplements or eat certain foods to boost the levels even further or is this just another ploy to sell us something we don’t really need? Express.co.uk takes a look at the what probiotics really do. Fermented foods like Kimichi, kerfir, kombucha tea and sauerkraut were one of the most popular food trends of last year. Fermented foods are considered to be a superfood is because people believe they contain probiotic bacteria – ‘friendly’ bacteria which live in the gut. “A growing body of research suggests that having the right balance of probiotic bacteria gut in the gut is important for health,” said Dr Arthur Ouwehand, Professor of Microbiology, and an expert in probiotics, from the University Of Turku, Finland. However he said while foods like sauerkraut and kimchi contain live bacteria, he can’t be sure the bacteria they contain are probiotic bacteria – the right strain of bacteria to reach the gut. What probiotic can do for you The type and the number of bacteria that you have living in your gut is important - they can keep the digestive system healthy by preventing the growth of unfriendly bacteria, said Fiona Hunter, nutritionist. She said: “The unfriendly bacteria has been linked to several health problems including food allergies, yeast infections, and inflammatory bowel disease. “Studies also show that probotics help reduce the risk of respiratory tract infections like coughs and colds and can help to relieve some of the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). “Other emerging research suggests that altering the balance of bacteria in the gut can help reduce the risk of metabolic synd Continue reading >>

Could A Probiotic Pill Cure Diabetes?

Could A Probiotic Pill Cure Diabetes?

More than 29 million people in the US have diabetes, and it is the seventh-leading cause of death in the country. But could a cure be on the horizon? According to researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, it could - in the form of a probiotic pill. In a proof-of-principle study published in the journal Diabetes, senior author John March and colleagues from Cornell reveal how they were able to reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic rats using a common bacteria found in the human gut. Diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas is either unable to produce enough of the hormone insulin, the body's cells do not effectively respond to the hormone, or both. As a result, blood glucose levels rise higher than normal - known as hyperglycemia. This can cause a number of complications, including stroke, heart disease and nerve damage. Diabetes prevalence has risen in the US in recent years, increasing from 25.8 million people affected in 2010 to 29.1 million in 2012. But with the findings of their study, March and colleagues say they may be one step closer to a cure for the condition. The researchers engineered a common strain of "friendly" human gut bacteria called Lactobacillus to secrete Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) - a hormone that releases insulin in response to food. Lactobacillus is a probiotic often used to prevent and treat diarrhea, as well as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn's disease and some skin disorders. Engineered probiotic reduced blood glucose levels by up to 30% Each day for 90 days, the team orally administered the modified probiotic to a group of diabetic rats. They monitored its effects on blood glucose levels, comparing the outcomes with diabetic rats that did not receive it. At the end of the 90 days, the researchers found the rats that Continue reading >>

Can Protein, Probiotics Aid Blood Sugar Control?

Can Protein, Probiotics Aid Blood Sugar Control?

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adding protein-rich or probiotic-laden foods to your diet may help control your blood sugar levels, according to a pair of new studies. Both proteins and probiotics appear to slow down digestion of carbohydrates, preventing blood sugar spikes that can lead to type 2 diabetes or exacerbate damage done by the disease, researchers found. Eating tuna fish with a slice of white bread produced a slower rise in blood sugar than eating carbs alone, said Huicui Meng, who led one of the studies. She's a postdoctoral researcher at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston in Boston. Meanwhile, people who added foods rich in probiotics -- a type of "good" bacteria -- to their heart-healthy DASH diet achieved a significant reduction in their blood sugar levels, said Arjun Pandey, a student at Waterloo Collegiate Institute in Ontario, Canada. you might like The results of both studies were presented this week at the American Heart Association's annual meeting, in New Orleans. But until peer-reviewed for publication in a medical journal, the conclusions should be considered preliminary. Although both were small-scale studies, the pair provide useful information that people can put into practice with their daily diets, said Dr. Prakash Deedwania, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, San Francisco. He is also vice chair of the American Heart Association's diabetes committee. "These are lifestyle changes that are easy to do, and important for the large amount of the population who have metabolic syndrome or are prediabetic," said Deedwania. People with metabolic syndrome have risk factors that can lead to heart disease, diabetes and stroke. For the protein-carbohydrate study, Continue reading >>

The Fascinating Link Between Type-1 Diabetes And The Human Gut

The Fascinating Link Between Type-1 Diabetes And The Human Gut

You are here: Home / Antibiotics / The Fascinating Link Between Type-1 Diabetes and the Human Gut The Fascinating Link Between Type-1 Diabetes and the Human Gut Interesting connections between our microbiomes and auto-immune disease like diabetes. It has been widely reported that auto-immune diseases, including Type-1 Diabetes, are on the rise world-wide. In an auto-immune disease, the immune system goes awry and launches an attack against the persons own cells, misidentifying them as a threat to attack. So why is it that in our developed world, where we have better access to nutrition, modern sanitation and advanced medical care, that auto-immune diseases such as Type-1 Diabetes are becoming more prevalent? Increasingly, doctors are coming to believe that there is a connection between the health of the gut microbiome and the increasing rates of Type-1 diabetes. This article will: examine the science behind the association between Type-1 diabetes and the health of the gut microbiome; look at how our modern world may be affecting the gut microbiome and leading to increased rates of Type-1 diabetes; and explore the science and logic behind how improving microbial health might prevent or delay the onset of Type-1 diabetes in those who are at risk of getting it. Diabetes is generally classified into two branches known as Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Type-1 diabetes, also known as Juvenile Diabetes or Insulin-dependent diabetes is an auto-immune disease in which the pancreas no longer produces (or produces in insufficient quantity) the hormone insulin. Insulin enables sugar to enter the cells of the body where it can be made into energy. When the sugar cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the bloodstream and causes lots of harm including blindness, and life-potentially de Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Yogurt can be a great nutrient-dense breakfast option or an easy snack. It is low in carbohydrates, meaning it won’t cause blood sugar spikes in people with diabetes. There may even be additional benefits for people with diabetes. What Research Shows Fermented foods, such as yogurt, contain good bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics have been shown to improve gut health. Research on gut health is ongoing, but gut bacteria and overall health could play a factor in a number of health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. What Do I Need to Know About Probiotics? Recent research shows that yogurt consumption might be associated with lower levels of glucose and insulin resistance, and lower systolic blood pressure. Another study found a potential link between regular yogurt consumption and a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. These studies are encouraging, but more research is needed to determine what link, if any, exists between yogurt and type 2 diabetes. What Makes Yogurt Great Most dairy products are low on the glycemic index. This makes them ideal for people with diabetes. To get the most out of your yogurt, check the labels before you purchase. If you want the gut benefits from the probiotics, choose a yogurt that contains live and active cultures. Also pay attention to the nutrition facts. Many yogurts have added sugars. Look for yogurts with high protein content and low carbohydrates, such as unflavored Greek yogurt. Sugar content among brands, and even among flavors within the same brand, can vary drastically, so check labels closely. Carbohydrates By Yogurt Type Yogurt Type (6 ounces) Carbohydrates Sugar plain Greek yogurt 6-8 grams 4-8 grams flavored Greek yogurt 16-22 grams 12-18 grams plain yogurt 11-15 grams 10-12 grams vanilla yogurt 22-33 grams 21-28 Continue reading >>

The Probiotic Used To Combat Stubborn Fat, Diabetes, And Depression

The Probiotic Used To Combat Stubborn Fat, Diabetes, And Depression

If you’re familiar with probiotics, you may also be familiar with the fact that there are many different strains of beneficial bacteria. One strain,Lactobacillus rhamnosus, may not be one you’re as familiar with, but it still holds some very impressive health benefits. This strain, among all the others, exist in what is called our “mircobiome,” which basically consists of the microbial genes that reside in your system. Good bacteria and bad bacteria live here, but it’s the helpful kind that keeps the harmful variety in check. The Benefits of Lactobacillus Rhamnosus Studies involving the Lactobacillus strain of bacteria suggest supplementation could lessen feelings of anxiety or ease symptoms of depression. Combining these probiotics with prebiotics also show significant benefits in mood health. [1][2] One study suggests taking L. rhamnosus might counteract weight gain and diabetes, and there’s a lot of research examining the benefits as a treatment for gastrointestinal issues like irritable bowel syndrome. [3] Another study suggests a link between good bacteria and seasonal allergies, particularly with hay fever. [4] Now, one cool thing about L. rhamnosus is that it can stay happy in rough conditions. Anyone who has ever had acid reflux knows how stomach acid can cause discomfort. Well, this probiotic strain actually thrives in anacidic stomach. [5] If you’re looking for something to strengthen your overall immune function, L. rhamnosus could help there. A promising study suggests this strain could be just as helpful as an antibiotic for treating urinary tract infections. [6] How to Take Lactobacillus Rhamnosus Taking a probiotic containing L. rhamnosus can certainly be beneficial, but it’s important to take prebiotics to strengthen its effects. Prebioti Continue reading >>

How Probiotics Affect Diabetics : Candida Yeast & Ibs : Active Low-carber Forums

How Probiotics Affect Diabetics : Candida Yeast & Ibs : Active Low-carber Forums

Can you eat live culture yogart or keffir without spiking your blood sugar? Both of those should be able to provide you with the live bacteria you need to replenish your system. Also, I don't think that they really help with the symptoms of die off but rather will reclaim the space in your gut that was overwhelmed by the yeast and keep it from growing back. I cannot imagine little probiotic caps can raise your BS that much. I mean the carb count on these things must be really low. I wonder what the culprit is... Which probiotic supplement are you taking? I'm not sure what you mean by FOS, but the ingredients in my Vitamin World Acidophilus are: beeswax/soybean oil mixture, gelatin, glycerin, lecithin, titanium dioxide color (guaranteed free of east, gluten, sugar, etc.), plus lactobacillus acidophilus 10 mg. The yogurts are higher in carbs (17-25 gm in 3 oz serving) and I'm trying to keep my carbs to 25-30 per day to keep blood sugars down as low as possible to avoid using insulin. I might be able to eat a tablespoon or so, but 3 oz would be about all I could eat all day of anything. The idea is great, but I don't think it would be practical for me. I didn't know the pro-b's wouldn't help with the bloating. So do I really even need the pro-b's now? I'm trying to figure out how to do a 4-day revolution diet to identify food allergies and intolerances but my brain is so foggy and eyes are so blurry that I have been unable to concentrate long enough to map it out. Does anyone have a template or other tool that might help detailing the diet? You need an antifungal to kill the yeast. You may need to work with your doctor to figure out what will work for you. Have you tried grapefruit seed extract? I've used it and it works. The Pro-B's are to rebuild the bacteria population Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Could One Day Be As Easy As Popping A Pill

Managing Diabetes Could One Day Be As Easy As Popping A Pill

2 pictures Researchers at Cornell University have successfully treated diabetic rats by engineering a strain of lactobacillus, a rod-shaped bacteria common in the human gut, resulting in up to 30 percent lower blood glucose levels. The technology could pave the way for a new treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes that could one day see managing diabetes be as easy as taking a daily probiotic pill.. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. In the US, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that around 29 million people have the disease, many of whom aren't even aware they have it. The Cornell study could take us one step closer to a safe, effective way for people to control the disease. In their proof of principle study the researchers modified a strain of human lactobacillus to secrete a protein called Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which helps manage blood sugar levels, and administered it orally to diabetic rats for 90 days. The upper intestinal epithelial cells of the diabetic rats were converted into cells that acted very much like pancreatic beta cells, which in healthy people monitor blood glucose levels and secrete insulin to balance glucose levels. The rats with high blood glucose developed insulin-producing cells within the upper intestine in numbers sufficient to replace 25 to 33 percent of the insulin capacity of nondiabetic healthy rats. "The amount of time to reduce glucose levels following a meal is the same as in a normal rat, … and it is matched to the amount of glucose in the blood, just as it would be with a normal-functioning pancreas," says John March, professor of biological and environmental engineering at Cornell University and the paper’s senior a Continue reading >>

Do You Take A Probiotic?

Do You Take A Probiotic?

Insulin is an essential part of my life with type 1 diabetes. (See also: duh) But it’s not the only thing I take regularly in efforts to maintain optimal health. (That sentence sounds so formal. “Optimal health.” Also makes me think of Transformers. Optiumus Health would be a badass Transformer … maybe a gas/electric hybrid instead of a tractor trailer?) I use a lot of things to rein in diabetes that aren’t prescribed, and a probiotic is one, these days. “Gut health” is a phrase I hear often in regards to autoimmune disease and overall health, and I’ve read several articles discussing the possible pros and cons of probiotics for people with diabetes. (Here’s one from TheDX with an excellent discussion point at the end about the assumption that “probiotics can’t hurt” and one from HealthCentral about type 1 and probiotic use. Lots of things to consider, especially once you start poking around in medical journal articles about probiotic use.) Most importantly, I talked with my doctor about taking a probiotic and both my endo and my PCP were fine with that addition to my regimen. But I honestly have no idea if it’s useful or effective. I don’t generally experience digestive trouble, but I’m not sure if I can attribute that lack of issue to taking a probiotic, since I’ve never really had digestive trouble. Overall, my “gut health” is ultra-fine, much like my needle tips. I’m curious, though: How many of you are taking probiotics, and do you feel they actually have an influence on your overall health? Do you feel better taking them? Worse? Taller? Smarter? Furrier? No different? Share: Continue reading >>

Probiotics Combat Insulin Resistance

Probiotics Combat Insulin Resistance

Two studies point to a connection between probiotics and blood sugar control. In the first study, researchers at Cornell University engineered a probiotic pill that promotes insulin production in mice, according to Diabetes.co.uk . The pill which contained the common stomach bacteria lactobacillus, was found to stimulate insulin production in the intestines. Researchers found that mice given the probiotic for 90 days experienced a 30% drop in blood glucose levels. The treatment proved equally effective with diabetic and non-diabetic mice. In an unrelated small study, researchers at Loughborough University found that a probiotic drink helped combat insulin resistance. In the study, 17 people with fully functioning pancreases were divided into two groups; one group was instructed to drink two bottles of probiotic milk every day for a month. Aside from this change, both groups maintained their normal diet for three weeks. All study participants were then put on a high-fat diet for a week. The probiotic drinkers maintained good glycemic control and normal insulin production after the high-fat diet, but insulin sensitivity decreased in the control group by 27%. Early research into probiotics and glycemic control so far seems to be focused on insulin resistance, making it more likely that the research will lead to possible therapies for Type 2 diabetes. However, researchers may someday also be able to develop probiotic treatments to extend the honeymoon period for those newly diagnosed with Type 1, as well. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here . Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation , our sister publication. Continue reading >>

Probiotics: Find Out About The Benefits And Side Effects

Probiotics: Find Out About The Benefits And Side Effects

Betty is a Registered Dietitian who earned her B.S. degree in Food and Nutrition from Marymount College of Fordham University and her M.S. degree in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She is the Co-Director and Director of nutrition for the New York Obesity Research Center Weight Loss Program. Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology. Alm, L. "Therapeutic Properties of Fermented Milk." Elseveir Science (1991): 45-64. Baquerizo Nole, K.L. "Probiotics and Prebiotics in Dermatology." J Am Acad Dermatol. 71.4 Oct. 2014: 814-821. Beighton, D. "Oral Bifidobacteria: Caries-associated Bacteria in Older Adults." J Dent Res 89.9 Sept. 2010: 970-974. Bellaguarda, E. "IBD and the gut microbiota--from bench to personalized medicine." Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 17.4 Apr. 2015: 15. Brown, K. "Diet-induced dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and the effects on immunity and disease." Nutrients 4.8 (2012): 1095-1119. ConsumerLab.com. Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Probiotics And Prebiotics For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Probiotics And Prebiotics For Diabetes

For holistic practitioners, the gut has always been central to health. In naturopathic medicine, for example, student physicians have long been taught to heal gut first—that health simply cannot be achieved without a healthy digestive system that can take in nutrients, digest them, absorb them and then eliminate the waste. One of the first aspects of digestive health that is commonly addressed is the health of the microbiome—the collection of bacteria that live in our guts in a symbiotic and mutualistic relationship with us. Symbiotic mutualism is the phrase used to describe the mutually beneficial relationship between these gut bacteria and us. Many people are surprised to learn that there are more bacteria in our bodies than our own human cells–some estimates suggest that there are 10 times as many bacterial cells in our body than our own cells! The microbiome affects overall health, weight and can significantly affect the risk of diseases such as heart disease, cancer, mental health, diabetes, obesity, stroke and other conditions., There are over 1000 different species of bacteria in the healthy microbiome. In general, the more diversity that exists in the microbiome, the better it is for our health. The bacteria in our guts produce or help to produce vitamins, neurotransmitters such as serotonin that can affect mood and are critically important in training or educating out immune systems to respond to dangerous pathologic bacteria, viruses and other infectious organisms.[1] To give just one example regarding the importance of the microbiome, when scientists transfer gut bacteria from thin, lean mice to the guts of obese mice, those obese mice begin to lose weight and over time, resemble the lean mice![2] The Microbiome and Diabetes A dysfunctional gut microbio Continue reading >>

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