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Can Diabetics Take Flexeril

Will You Have Type 2 Diabetes With Flexeril - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Type 2 Diabetes With Flexeril - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Order discounted lab tests to monitor your medications, no doctor referral required NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Compounding Meds For Diabetic Neuropathic Pain: Can They Have An Impact?

Compounding Meds For Diabetic Neuropathic Pain: Can They Have An Impact?

Compounding Meds For Diabetic Neuropathic Pain: Can They Have An Impact? Topical compounded medications may play a key role in the armamentarium of treatments for diabetic neuropathy, particularly patients who have multiple comorbidities and polypharmacy issues. Accordingly, this author demonstrates how compounding can optimize drug concentration at the site of pain with a lower risk of adverse sequelae. The treatment of diabetic neuropathy includes efforts to correct the underlying metabolic disorder as well as addressing symptomatology associated with diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy secondary to diabetes is likely the most common peripheral neuropathy that podiatrists treat. The pathologic basis for diabetic neuropathy remains unclear and there are no proven therapies that studies have demonstrated to universally interdict or reverse the progression of diabetic neuropathy. However, some therapies are helpful at reducing symptomatology secondary to diabetic sensory neuropathy, preventing further nerve degeneration and possibly enhancing the regrowth of nerves.1 Diabetic neuropathy typically begins as a small fiber neuropathy affecting the small unmyelinated or thinly myelinated nerve fibers that subserve pain, temperature perception, heart rate, blood pressure, sweat function and gastrointestinal function.2 The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include manifestations of sensory, motor and autonomic dysfunction.3 These symptoms may include numbness, dysesthesia, paresthesia or allodynia. Decreased thermal sensation and vasomotor dysfunction are also early manifestations of diabetic neuropathy. Edema, imbalance and ulceration are known complications of diabetic neuropathy. Motor neuropathy may be characterized by an intrinsic minus foot with atrophy of the norma Continue reading >>

Common Side Effects Of Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine Hcl) Drug Center - Rxlist

Common Side Effects Of Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine Hcl) Drug Center - Rxlist

For most patients, the recommended dose of Flexeril is 5 mg three times a day. Flexeril may interact with tricyclic antidepressants , atropine , benztropine , dimenhydrinate, methscopolamine, scopolamine , bronchodilators, glycopyrrolate , guanethidine, mepenzolate, tramadol , bladder or urinary medications, or irritable bowel medications, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), alcohol, barbiturates, and other central nervous system depressants. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment with Flexeril. Flexeril is not expected to be harmful to a fetus. It is unknown if Flexeril passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using cyclobenzaprine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; confusion, weakness, lack of coordination; nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or Continue reading >>

Amrix, Comfort Pac With Cyclobenzaprine, Fexmid, Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Amrix, Comfort Pac With Cyclobenzaprine, Fexmid, Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

pentagonal, peach, imprinted with FLEXERIL What are the possible side effects of cyclobenzaprine (Amrix, Comfort Pac with Cyclobenzaprine, Fexmid, Flexeril)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using cyclobenzaprine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache , confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about cyclobenzaprine (Amrix, Comfort Pac with Cyclobenzaprine, Fexmid, Flexeril)? Do not take cyclobenzaprine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), tranylcypromine (Parnate), phenelzine (Nardil), or selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take cyclobenzaprine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. You should not take cyclobenzaprine if you have recently had a heart attack , or if you have a heart rhythm disorder, congestive heart failure , heart block, or an overactive thyroid . Cyclobenzaprine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol, which can increase some of the side effects of cyclobenzaprine. What should I discuss with my doctor before taking Continue reading >>

Flexeril Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Flexeril Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Cyclobenzaprine is used short-term to treat muscle spasms . It is usually used along with rest and physical therapy. It works by helping to relax the muscles. Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually 3 times a day. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. This medication should only be used short-term (for 3 weeks or less) unless directed by your doctor. Do not increase your dose or use this drug more often or for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase. Tell your doctor if your condition persists after 2 to 3 weeks or if it worsens. Drowsiness, dizziness , dry mouth , constipation , or tiredness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: fast/irregular heartbeat, mental/mood changes (such as confusion, hallucinations ), trouble urinating. A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction , including: rash , itching /swelling (especially of the face/ tongue /throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing . This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch. In Canada Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Pain Relief | Diabetic Connect

Diabetic Neuropathy Pain Relief | Diabetic Connect

I was taking Lyrica and Cymbalta and they really helped me. I have a severe case of neuropathy even though I have my blood sugar under control, the nerve damage is done. I stopped taking Lyrica because Medicaid wouldn't pay for it. Then I lost my insurance. I was able to wean myself off Lyrica gradually. The withdrawl symptoms are terrible so it has to be done slowly. Now my problem is my phantom limb pain. It has become worse. I lost my right foot a year ago to a bone infection that went into my blood and gave me sepsis. My left foot has a bad case of Charcot foot. The Cymbalta helps a little but I have noticed since I stopped the Lyrica the nerve pain in both legs has returned. Gabapentin is worthless for me. I wish I could go on morphine pills but my doc doesn't want me on narcotics. I have diabetic neuropathy in both of my feet and half way up my calves. I also have it in my fingertips of all my fingers. My dr. told me that with as advanced as the neuropathy is I have been a diabetic for at least 10 years and didn't realize it. I don't envy those of you that have the painful form of neuropathy. I friend of mine has that type, also diabetic, and he is now on morphine for his pain. My problem is I can't feel anything when I'm walking. I've got slivers in my feet and not known until the area became infected. I've also burned my fingers because I forget and pick up hot pans and hold them too long. Bumps and bruises have nothing on Neuro pain. I have dealt with such pain for over 15 years. Narcotics are not the answer, but I do agree Lyrica has been a big help. In addition I take Flexeril and the combination has worked well for the last 4 or 5 years. bear in mind, you will never be completely "pain-free", but this combo works for me. Hi Optiguy I had neuropathy in my fe Continue reading >>

Will You Have Diabetes Mellitus With Flexeril - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Diabetes Mellitus With Flexeril - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Order discounted lab tests to monitor your medications, no doctor referral required NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Healthy Outlook: A Look At Medication Options For Back Pain - Contra Costa Health Services

Healthy Outlook: A Look At Medication Options For Back Pain - Contra Costa Health Services

Topics > Healthy Outlook > A Look at Medication Options for Back Pain A Look at Medication Options for Back Pain "DR. DANIELS, I need something strong for my back pain. It's really hurting." A common statement by a patient suffering from back pain. So what kinds of medicines are used to treat back pain? By far the safest medicine is Tylenol or its generic equivalent. For many patients, Tylenol can relieve back pain. It should not be taken with alcohol, and can cause kidney damage in the elderly or if taken for years on a regular basis. A second type of medication doctors prescribe for back pain are the NSAIDs or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The NSAIDs can reduce inflammation and pain, without most of the serious side effects of steroids, even if taken for many years. NSAIDs include Motrin, Advil, Naprosyn, Relafen, Mobic, Celebrex and many others. NSAIDs can have side effects, including stomach irritation, and stomach bleeding. They can raise blood pressure, and can damage the kidneys, especially after prolonged use. Steroids such as prednisone are the strongest anti-inflammatory drugs available. Some doctors prescribe a short course for acute injuries (usually for less than two weeks) with excellent benefit. Ask your doctor about this. The next type of medication used for back pain are the muscle relaxants. These include Robaxin, Baclofen, Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) and Soma. Although called "muscle relaxants," not all these medications have been shown to relax muscles in humans. In most cases, their mechanism of action for helping pain in unknown. Many patients find them quite helpful, however. Patients often benefit from a high initial dose of Robaxin (6-8 grams per day), but after two to three days, the dose can be reduced to about 4 grams per day. Robaxi Continue reading >>

Cyclobenzaprine: Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, And More

Cyclobenzaprine: Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, And More

Cyclobenzaprine oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand name: Fexmid. Cyclobenzaprine also comes as an extended-release capsule that you take by mouth. Cyclobenzaprine oral tablet is used to help relieve muscle spasms. Its used along with rest and physical therapy. It should only be used for two to three weeks at a time. Cyclobenzaprine oral tablet is a prescription drug thats available as the brand-name drug Fexmid. Its also available as a generic drug. Generic drugs usually cost less than the brand-name version. In some cases, they may not be available in all strengths or forms as the brand-name drug. Cyclobenzaprine also comes as an oral extended-release capsule. Cyclobenzaprine oral tablet is used to help relax muscles. It helps relieve pain, stiffness, or discomfort caused by strains or injuries to your muscles. Its used along with rest and physical therapy. It should only be used for two to three weeks at a time. Cyclobenzaprine may be used as part of a combination therapy. This means you may need to take it with other medications. Cyclobenzaprine belongs to a class of drugs called muscle relaxants. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. These drugs are often used to treat similar conditions. It isnt known exactly how this drug works to relax your muscles. It may decrease the signals from your brain that tell your muscles to spasm. Cyclobenzaprine oral tablet may cause drowsiness and dizziness. This is more likely to happen in the few hours after you take it. It can also have other side effects. The more common side effects of cyclobenzaprine can include: loss of control or numbness in your face, arms, or legs Serotonin syndrome. Symptoms can include: agitation (a feeling of aggravation or restlessness Continue reading >>

Flexeril And Type 2 Diabetes

Flexeril And Type 2 Diabetes

16 discussions around the web mention both Uses: Flexeril is prescribed for Pain and is mostly mentioned together with this indication. In addition, our data suggest that it is taken for Fibromyalgia , although it is not approved for this condition*. Read More Dr put me put me on high doses of Lyrica, Cymbalta, "Many times with Lupus weight gain will be caused due to the meds that we are given. I now double check all of my new meds on webmd.com before having them filled & talk them over with my Dr's of I have any questions re: weight gain at all before taking them !!! When I 1st started taking meds for Lupus in Dec 04' I never questioned anything, I just did as the Dr's said. Dr put me put me on high doses of Lyrica, Cymbalta, Darvaset read more... & Flexeral which caused me to gain a lot of weight. By Dec 08' I was ast 230 pounds at 5'4 , on High Blood Pressure Meds, Type II Diabetes Meds, Heart Meds, 2 types of Inhailer's. I could hardly walk any lenght of time at all or breath while doing it !!! Now since Dec 08' I have changed Dr's, the meds that I was taking, went on the Atkins Program starting Jan 1st 09', was able to stop taking my HBP & Type II meds in Mid~May 09' & went from a size 18 to an 8 as of today's date nov 18th 09' !!! Now don't get me wrong I still have many days that I feel like an Elephant ran me over & my Immune System is still weak, but getting my Meds & Weight under control has made a BIG difference !!! Continue reading >>

9 Types Of Medication Older Adults Should Use With Caution

9 Types Of Medication Older Adults Should Use With Caution

As a result, it's not uncommon for older adults to be overmedicated and to experience adverse reactions to the ever-lengthening list of medications they take. To lower the chances of overmedication and dangerous drug reactions, the American Geriatrics Society Foundation for Health in Aging recommends that people age 65 and over be cautious about using the following types of drugs: Important: If you are taking any of these medications, talk to your doctor or health care provider before stopping their use. 1. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Be cautious of: long-lasting NSAIDS such as piroxicam (sold under the brand-name Feldene) and indomethacin (Indocin). The concern: NSAIDs are used to reduce pain and inflammation, but in older adults these medications can increase the risk of indigestion, ulcers and bleeding in the stomach or colon; they can also increase blood pressure, affect your kidneys and make heart failure worse. If NSAIDS are needed, better choices include the shorter-acting ibuprofen (Motrin) and salsalate (Disalcid). Because of the increased risk of bleeding, don't use NSAIDs together with aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dabigatran (Pradaxa), dipyridamole (Persantine), prasugrel (Effient), ticlopidine (Ticlid) or warfarin (Coumadin). If you take NSAIDs regularly and have a history of ulcers, or are 75 years of age or older, you may need to protect your stomach against bleeding with a prescription medication such as misoprostol (Cytotec) or a proton pump inhibitor such as omeprazole (Prilosec). 2. Muscle relaxants Be cautious of: cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), methocarbamol (Robaxin), carisoprodol (Soma) and similar medications. The concern: These medications can leave you feeling groggy and confused, increase your risk of falls, and cause constipat Continue reading >>

Cyclobenzaprine - Oral (flexeril) Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

Cyclobenzaprine - Oral (flexeril) Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

GENERIC NAME: CYCLOBENZAPRINE - ORAL (sye-klo-BENZ-uh-preen) Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: Cyclobenzaprine is used short-term to treat muscle spasms . It is usually used along with rest and physical therapy. It works by helping to relax the muscles. HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually 3 times a day.The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. This medication should only be used short-term (for 3 weeks or less) unless directed by your doctor. Do not increase your dose or use this drug more often or for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase.Tell your doctor if your condition persists after 2 to 3 weeks or if it worsens. SIDE EFFECTS: Drowsiness, dizziness , dry mouth , constipation , or tiredness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: fast/irregular heartbeat, mental/mood changes (such as confusion , hallucinations ), trouble urinating.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash , itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness , trouble breathing .This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other e Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Will The Use Of Cyclobenzaprine Effect Your Blood Sugar To Make It Go Higher?

Will The Use Of Cyclobenzaprine Effect Your Blood Sugar To Make It Go Higher?

Home Q & A Questions Will the use of... Will the use of cyclobenzaprine effect your blood sugar to make it go higher? diabetes, type 2 , cyclobenzaprine , insulin , medicine , diabetic If a diabetic with type 2 uses this medicine will it effect the insulin levels and result in higher levels It certainly should not raise your blood sugar. Nor should it interact with oral diabetic meds. What are you on for diabetes? Cyclobenzaprine (Includes Cyclobenzaprine) Cardiovascular Disease Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility Applies to: Hyperthyroidism, Cardiovascular Disease, Cerebrovascular Insufficiency, History - Cerebrovascular Disease, History - Myocardial Infarction, Hypotension, Dehydration The manufacturers consider the use of cyclobenzaprine to be contraindicated in the acute recovery phase following myocardial infarction and in patients with hyperthyroidism, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, and/or conduction disturbances. Cyclobenzaprine is structurally related to the tricyclic antidepressants , which have been reported to cause tachycardia, arrhythmias, heart block, hypertension, hypotension (particularly orthostatic hypotension), thrombosis, thrombophlebitis, myocardial infarction, strokes, congestive heart failure, and ECG abnormalities such as PR and QT interval prolongation. Therapy with cyclobenzaprine should be administered cautiously in patients with a history of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease or a predisposition to hypotension, particularly if the intended dosage exceeds those normally used for musculoskeletal conditions. Tachycardia, arrhythmia, palpitation, and hypotension have been reported with the use of cyclobenzaprine in less than 1% of patients. Cyclobenzaprine (Includes Cyclobenzaprine) Anticholinergic Effects Continue reading >>

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