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Can Diabetics Take Cough Syrup?

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

How Farxiga May Help

How Farxiga May Help

Being inspired to fight back against your type 2 diabetes is an important first step in your treatment plan. Sometimes, one of the next steps is taking a medication that may help control your blood sugar. FARXIGA (far-SEE-guh) is a once-daily pill taken in the morning with or without food. In studies, FARXIGA: Additionally, FARXIGA may help you: Do not take FARXIGA if you: have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA FARXIGA may cause serious side effects including: Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems FARXIGA has been tested in 24 clinical studies that looked at its benefits and safety. The studies had more than 11,000 adults with type 2 diabetes, including more than 6,000 patients treated with FARXIGA. FARXIGA, combined with diet and exercise, was studied alone as well as in combination with other diabetes medicines you may be taking. The other medicines included metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, insulin, and sitagliptin. Real patients. Real stories. Patients who are fighting back, sharing their challenges—and their successes—managing their type 2 diabetes. See Patient Stories FARXIGA works with the body to flush sugar away in urine. Learn more about how FARXIGA works › Continue reading >>

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better for Type 2 Diabetes? Use of a sulfonylurea as second-line therapy after metformin for type 2 diabetes is just as effective as a newer agent but far less costly, a new study based on claims data finds. The results were published online February 26 in Diabetes Care by Yuanhui Zhang, a PhD candidate at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, and colleagues. "In light of an incomplete understanding of the pros and cons of second-line medications and the high cost associated with newer medications, the decision to use newer medications should be weighed against the additional cost burden to patients and/or the health system," study coauthor Brian Denton, PhD, of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, told Medscape Medical News. However, the use of retrospective data means that the study is subject to both ascertainment and physician-choice bias, said Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, when asked to comment for Medscape Medical News. Moreover, noted Dr. Garber, the study doesn't adequately account for the adverse effects of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia. "Patients value things differently. If you had a hypoglycemic episode and you don't like that, you're willing to pay a lot more of your discretionary income to avoid having another one." The researchers explain that there are currently 11 classes of approved glucose-lowering medications. Metformin has a long-standing evidence base for efficacy and safety, is inexpensive, and is regarded by most as the primary first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. When metformin fails to achieve or maintain glycemic goals, another agent needs to be added. However, there is no consensus or sufficient evidence supporting the use of one second-line agent over Continue reading >>

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Selected Risk Information About JANUMET and JANUMET XR Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinkin Continue reading >>

Over The Counter Cough Medicine And Diabetes: A Safe Approach

Over The Counter Cough Medicine And Diabetes: A Safe Approach

The “common cold” may cause some patients with diabetes to worry about elevations in their blood sugar. When you get sick, your body is under a lot of stress. Your body tries to make up for this stress by releasing hormones to fight the sickness. These hormones may cause your blood sugar levels to rise. There is no cure for the common cold; we have to help with symptoms that we are suffering. One of the annoying symptoms is a cough. There are 2 main ingredients over the counter helpful for a cough, yet so many products on the shelf. You will find that they contain one if not both of these medications and may be mixed with pain medication or medicine for congestion. This can be confusing, especially if when worried about raising blood sugar levels. Keep in mind is that suffering from cold symptoms usually is short term barring any complications. It is temporary and soon you will be feeling better. There are two main types of cough- a wet, mucus cough and a dry, hacking cough. They are treated differently. When you want to get rid of the mucus in your lungs (wet cough) this is treated with an expectorant – guaifenesin. A dry cough is treated with a cough suppressant –dextromethorphan. Guaifenesin is an expectorant that helps break up and clear mucus in your lungs. It is available in tablet and liquid form. The tablets, available 600 mg or higher, are more potent, and work better than the smaller doses available in a syrup as 100 mg. For a dry cough, the most effective medication is dextromethorphan. This is available in a syrup, tablet or capsule form. This medication will work in your brain’s cough center to make you less likely to cough. Although the medication is available as a syrup you only need to take 2-4 teaspoons full per day. The likelihood of this sma Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Spring is really starting to burst out here in Massachusetts. The tulips are blooming and leaves and buds are popping out on the trees. As pretty and welcoming as this is, many of you (about 50 million!) are probably bracing yourself for all of the pollen that is soon to follow, and suffering through the misery that it can bring. Thanks to the mild winter that we had in the Northeast, plants are pollinating earlier than usual. As if that weren’t bad enough, having seasonal allergies can also affect your blood sugar control. Seasonal allergies: do you have them? Seasonal allergies are sometimes called hay fever or, more technically, seasonal allergic rhinitis. You might be wondering if your symptoms are due to a cold, flu, or allergies. While there can be some overlap, the following symptoms are usually indicative of allergies: • Itchy eyes • Watery eyes • Dark circles under the eyes • Sneezing • Runny nose • Stuffy nose • Sore throat You might also feel a little bit tired. You won’t get a fever from allergies, however. These symptoms can linger for weeks unless they’re treated. Treating allergies There are a number of remedies for seasonal allergies, including oral medications, nasal sprays, and eye drops. It’s important that you not only choose the right one for your symptoms, but that you also are aware of how these medicines might affect your blood sugars. The following types of allergy medicines may affect your blood glucose levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines can reduce sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy), and fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy). Antihistamines might be combined with a deconge Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

In the midst of cold and flu season, you may wonder what medications are safe to take without greatly impacting blood glucose levels when you have diabetes. Overall, it's the sickness that increases blood glucose in people with diabetes, not the medication used to treat it. However, some medications should be used with caution. Stacey O'Donnell, R.N., B.S., C.D.E., nurse manager, at Joslin Diabetes Center, goes over different types of medications and how they could impact your diabetes. Examples: Tylenol, Aspirin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Use cautiously if you have renal disease. Anti-inflammatory Examples: Ibuprofen, such as Advil, Motrin, Nuprin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Also should be used carefully if you have renal disease. Examples: Allegra, Bumex Effect on diabetes: Caution should be used in patients who have diabetes with renal disease, cardiac disease and high blood pressure. General guidelines for taking medications for people with diabetes are to avoid products containing sugar, such as sucrose, dextrose, fructose, lactose and honey, O'Donnell says. Also, choose products with little or no alcohol. A suggested list of sugar-free cough and cold medicines includes: Chlor-Trometon tablets Dimetapp Elixir Scot-Tussin DM Liquid Cerose-DM Liquid Continue reading >>

Understanding Oral Diabetes Medications

Understanding Oral Diabetes Medications

by Gail Brashers-Krug Today, almost 21 million Americans have diabetes, and more than 90 percent of those have type 2, or insulin resistant diabetes. Doctors often prescribe oral medications to treat type 2 diabetes, either alone or combination with insulin therapy. This article provides a guide to those oral medications. Which Diabetics Use Pills? With a few exceptions, diabetes comes in two types. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin on its own. To treat type 1, you must restore the proper amount of insulin—either by taking insulin (through injection or inhalation), or by receiving a transplant, either of an entire pancreas or of specialized pancreas cells, called islet cells. Type 1 cannot be treated with oral medications. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body produces enough insulin, but gradually becomes insulin resistant—that is, loses the ability to process insulin. Type 2 is usually controlled first through diet and exercise, which improve your body’s ability to process its insulin. For most type 2 diabetics, however, diet and exercise changes are not enough. The next step is oral diabetes medication. Moreover, most type 2 diabetics eventually stop producing enough insulin, and often cease insulin production altogether. As a result, many type 2 diabetics will ultimately need insulin therapy in combination with their pills. How Do the Different Pills Work? Oral diabetes medications attack the problem in three ways. More insulin: Some pills stimulate your pancreas to produce more insulin. The first successful “diabetes pills” were the sulfonylureas (glyburide, glipizide, glimepiride, tolazamide, chlorpropamide, and tolbutamide). These are insulin secretagogues, that is, chemicals that cause your pancreas to produce more ins Continue reading >>

Using Expired Medicine

Using Expired Medicine

When we act like responsible adults, we always look at the expiration dates on the containers of prescription medicine and over-the-counter drugs that we use. Just to give one example, I can’t count the number of times that I have tossed old aspirin tablets. Now, it turns out, I was throwing away my money. From now on I will be saving money after reading an article in the current issue of my favorite health newsletter, which I subscribe to the old-fashioned way, on paper. The article, “Out on a date” in the October issue of the “UC Berkeley Wellness Letter,” explains that expiration dates are guarantees that prescription and over-the-counter drugs will be both potent and safe until then. But they don’t mean that after the expiration date, they won’t be effective or safe. It all comes down to money. Ours and that of the drug companies. “In many cases, drugs are stable for longer,” the article concludes, “but there’s little incentive for manufacturers to test them to see how long they will really last. Longer expiration dates would cut down on sales.” At least in this respect (and in probably many other ways), my friend Gretchen Becker is wiser than me. She tells me that she was already taking the expiration dates with a grain of salt. “It’s not as if the medication is fine until midnight Sunday and then suddenly, starting Monday at 1 a.m., it’s no good,” she says. How long since the drug companies stamped out their pills is just one of many factors determining when the drugs begin to break down. Heat, humidity, light, and temperature fluctuations all count. Those are good reasons for us to store our pills in cool, dry, and dark places. Keeping them in our cars and bathrooms would be the worst places. Insulin is one huge exception to the ex Continue reading >>

Diabetes – Too Much Medicine May Kill You

Diabetes – Too Much Medicine May Kill You

When treating people with Type 2 Diabetes, doctors sometimes prescribe high doses of medications that lower blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association recommends good control of blood sugars in order to reduce the risk of heart attacks. But recently part of a large clinical diabetes study was halted after researchers found an increased death rate among those taking higher doses of blood sugar-lowering medication. The ACCORD trial, as it is called, is funded by several U.S. government agencies and the finding surprised many doctors. The surprise death rate has led some U.S. physicians to push an uncommon diet as a way to lower blood sugar. Features: Eric Westman, MD, Mary Vernon, MD, James Felicetta, MD. Shelley Schlender reports from Phoenix, Arizona. First Broadcast on Voice of America. As if having diabetes isn’t hard enough, it increases the likelihood of other ailments, such as heart attacks. Most diabetics could reduce these risks if only they kept their blood sugars low through exercise and a healthy diet. Since most don’t, U-S, doctors fill the gap with blood sugar lowering drugs. But a recent study indicates that very high doses can increase heart attacks. This is leading some physicians to say that the U-S should focus less on medication, and more on diabetic diets. NARR When people want comfort food, they often go for pasta,, tortillas, rice, bread, French Fries, donuts, chips. But in a diabetic, these high carbohydrate foods can raise blood sugars to dangerous levels, leading to blindness, kidney problems, and heart attacks. A small percentage of diabetics, called Type I, must control blood sugars with insulin injections. However most diabetics are Type II, and their bodies make plenty of insulin. Their blood sugars could be normal, if they watched th Continue reading >>

Non-diabetes Medicines That May Lower Blood Sugar

Non-diabetes Medicines That May Lower Blood Sugar

British Columbia Specific Information Your health care provider may prescribe you non-diabetic medications, or diabetic medications, which may raise or lower your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it is important to remember and understand which medications may affect your blood sugar levels. Examples of medications that may lower your blood sugar include: quinolone antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, mocifloxacin); pentamidine; quinine; ace inhibitors (ramapril, enalapril); and beta-blockers (atenolol, metropolol). In addition, beta-blockers may also decrease or mask the symptoms of low blood sugar. For more information, call 8-1-1 to speak with a registered nurse or pharmacist. Our nurses are available anytime, every day of the year; and our pharmacists are available every night from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 a.m. Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Heart Failure | Over-the-counter Medicines

Heart Failure | Over-the-counter Medicines

Read the labels of all over-the-counter medicines you take. Ask your pharmacist or health care provider if they are safe for you. Many stores have their own generic brands of medicines. Check with your pharmacist or health care provider before using any over-the-counter and generic medicines. This includes products labeled as herbals. The safest cough and cold medicines for you are: chlorepheniramine (Chlortrimeton or AllerChlor) guaifenesin with dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM) Cough and cold medicines you should not take: pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Actifed, Contrex and Nyquil) ephedrine (also known as "ma huang") or any kind of appetite suppressant (such as Metabolife) Sodium causes your body to retain fluid. This increases your blood pressure and makes your heart work harder. The following medicines are high in sodium: Vicks 44 Cough Syrup, Vicks 44 Cough Relief The following medicines may cause you to retain sodium and fluid: ibuprofen (Nuprin, Advil, Motrin and many brands) Continue reading >>

Oral Medicines For Diabetes

Oral Medicines For Diabetes

What medicines could my doctor prescribe? Six kinds of diabetes medicine are available in pill form: metformin (a biguanide), sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. Each medicine has good points and bad points. Your doctor will decide which medicine is right for you. Metformin is a type of biguanide and it is currently the only biguanide available in the United States. It is often the first oral medicine prescribed for someone newly diagnosed with diabetes. It has the advantage of not causing low blood sugar. Metformin does not cause your pancreas to make insulin, but it helps your body use insulin better. Metformin can cause side effects such as nausea or diarrhea in some people. Your doctor may prescribe metformin in combination with another oral diabetes medicine. Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are the most commonly prescribed diabetes medicines. These medicines help your pancreas make insulin. They are inexpensive and have few side effects. There are 3 types of sulfonyureas: glipizide, glimepiride and glyburide. Side effects may include weight gain and low level of sodium in the blood. Sulfonylureas can be taken alone or with metformin, pioglitazone (a thiazolidinedione) or insulin. If you’re allergic to sulfa, you can’t take a sulfonylurea. This class of medicines includes rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These medicines help your body respond better to insulin. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone can be used alone or in combination with other diabetes medicines. Side effects may include weight gain, fluid retention and an increase in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. People taking rosiglitazone and pioglitazone also need periodic liver tests. Continue reading >>

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