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Can Diabetics Take Claritin

Drug Interactions Between Claritin And Metformin

Drug Interactions Between Claritin And Metformin

Interactions between your drugs The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply. Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Unknown No information available. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interac Continue reading >>

Claritin And Blood Pressure: Whats The Risk?

Claritin And Blood Pressure: Whats The Risk?

Claritin and Blood Pressure: Is There a Connection? Many heart patients are worried about the connection between Claritin and blood pressure. Should they be concerned? Claritin combines antihistamines and decongestants to relieve symptoms associated with allergies. Antihistamines block the effects of histamine (a substance naturally produced by your body). Histamine can cause Decongestants like phenylephrine, and pseudoephedrine produce a narrowing of blood vessels which leads to the clearing of nasal congestion. A common cause of high blood pressure is the narrowing of blood vessels such as with coronary heart disease . As blood vessels become clogged or narrowed the heart must pump the blood at greater force to push it through. Many blood pressure medicines are effective because they open up these constricted blood vessels. Because Claritin causes blood vessel narrowing there is some risk involved if you already have high blood pressure. Long-term high blood pressure damages the heart and cardiovascular system. If left untreated it could lead to Though doctors do not always know the cause of a patients hypertension there are medications that can help. You can also help lower your blood pressure by adopting some lifestyle changes . Take your high blood pressure seriously. If your heart is already working hard because of high blood pressure then taking Claritin can put you at greater risk. Are you sick and tired of just notfeeling great? Are there health issues in addition to your heart health that concern you? Like Anxiety? Or not sleeping well? Or joint pain? Or low energy?Or poor digestion? Or weight gain? Or stress? Why do so many people suffer fromthese symptoms and others? Those nagging health issues that seem so difficultto define. Did you know that these health Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

Which Drugs Can Raise Your Cholesterol Levels?

Which Drugs Can Raise Your Cholesterol Levels?

Some of the medications you are taking for other medical conditions, such as high blood pressure or hormonal treatments – may adversely affect your lipid levels. This could include increasing your LDL and triglyceride levels or lowering your HDL cholesterol. This may be bothersome if you have never had to worry about high cholesterol before. Additionally, if you are currently on medications to lower your cholesterol, you might notice that your therapy may need to be adjusted. Although this is not an inclusive list, the drugs listed below are the more commonly used medications that could potentially affect your lipid levels. You should always disclose to your healthcare provider the medications that you are taking, so he or she can rule out whether or not any medications or natural products are adversely affecting your health: Prednisone Prednisone is a glucocorticoid that is used to reduce the swelling, warmth, and tenderness associated with many inflammatory conditions. Despite the relief they may give to you, they can raise triglycerides, LDL cholesterol levels, and HDL cholesterol levels. It doesn't take long to see a substantial rise in cholesterol levels: Some studies showed that patients had higher cholesterol levels within two weeks of treatment. Beta Blockers Beta blockers are medications that are normally prescribed to treat high blood pressure. Despite the significant advantages, they offer in treating several forms of heart disease, beta blockers also have been noted to decrease HDL levels and elevate triglyceride levels. In most cases, however, these lipid changes have been very small. It is important to note that not all beta blockers have this effect. The following beta-blockers have been noted to slightly alter lipid profiles: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Biso Continue reading >>

What Meds Does Ginger Root Interfere With?

What Meds Does Ginger Root Interfere With?

Ginger root made from the root, or rhizome of the ginger plant, has long been used to treat conditions such as stomach upset, arthritis and the common cold in Asian, Indian and Arabic cultures. But ginger root, like many herbal substances, can also affect the absorption or effectiveness of a number of other medications. Do not take ginger root without your medical practitioner’s approval if you take prescription medications. Video of the Day Ginger root, like many other herbs, can act as a blood thinner or anticoagulant, reducing the blood’s ability to clot. If you take prescription anticoagulant medications such as warfarin, sold as Coumadin, heparin or over-the-counter blood thinning medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen, do not take ginger root without your doctor’s approval. Signs of excessive bleeding include spontaneous bruising, blood in the stool, vomiting blood or bleeding that’s difficult to stop if you injure yourself. Tell your doctor if you take ginger if you’re planning on having surgery; he may ask you to stop taking ginger several weeks before surgery to prevent excessive bleeding. Antidiabetic Medications Ginger root may decrease blood glucose levels. If you take medications to lower your blood sugar because you have diabetes, ginger root could cause blood sugars to drop abnormally low, a condition known as hypoglycemia. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include shakiness, sweating, hunger, difficulty thinking clearly, dizziness, difficulty talking or loss of consciousness. People on antidiabetic medications such as insulin, metformin, glyburide and rosiglitazone should not take ginger root unless their doctor approves. Classes of medications known as calcium channel blockers are used to lower blood pressure. Drugs in this class include verapamil, d Continue reading >>

Sinus Infections With Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Sinus Infections With Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

I have had a sinus infection on the right side of my head for two months. I am currently on my third antibiotic and in the care of an ENT. I am concerned that the doctors are not taking my T2 diabetes into account during my treatment. I was on Ceftin for 10 days which almost cleared the problem up, but a few days after the antibiotics ran out the headaches and pain/stuffiness came back. Then I was put on Avelox for 14 days and it did little or nothing to my symptoms. Now two weeks later I am on Omnicef for 10 days. It seems to be knocking out the symptoms, but I am afraid that in a couple weeks after the drugs run out I will be in the same situation with pain and terrible headaches. Anyone out there with similar experience or advice? glad your symptoms have improved. I hope something will knock it out soon. I know how you feel. I have chronic sinusitus my allergy doc said years ago. I suffered for many years with several sinus infections per year, started with one, then two then three each year, until I finally went to the ENT. I hope you don't go down that road. He put me on a regimen on a prescription nasal spray and Claritin, worked well for a few years, now he has me on Zyrtec in the morning, Singulair at night, works great for me, have not had an infection in about two years. Sorry about those headaches, I never had them too bad, sometimes I had them sometimes not, sometimes fever but usually no fever. My main thing was all the congestion, just a yucky sick feeling, did not want to do anything, and awful sore throat, sometimes coughing a lot. I hope they are taking your diabetes seriously. He asked me if I wanted a shot once, after I was diagnosed, told me it would raise my BS, I said no thanks. I had a sinus infection and bronhitis for almost 4 months. Antibiotic Continue reading >>

Claritin Allergy + Sinus (loratadine - Pseudoephedrine) - Information About This Drug | Uniprix

Claritin Allergy + Sinus (loratadine - Pseudoephedrine) - Information About This Drug | Uniprix

Brand Name Claritin Allergy + Sinus Common Name loratadine - pseudoephedrine How does this medication work? What will it do for me? How should I use this medication? What form(s) does this medication come in? Who should NOT take this medication? What side effects are possible with this medication? Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? What other drugs could interact with this medication? How does this medication work? What will it do for me? This medication contains 2 active ingredients, loratadine and pseudoephedrine. Together, loratadine and pseudoephedrine work to relieve the symptoms associated with allergic rhinitis, including nasal and sinus congestion, sneezing, postnasal discharge, and tearing and redness of the eyes. During an allergic reaction, the body produces a chemical called histamine, which causes allergy symptoms such as hives, runny nose, congestion, and itchy, watery eyes. Loratadine belongs to a group of medications known as antihistamines. It works by blocking the action of histamine in the body. Pseudoephedrine belongs to a group of medications called decongestants. It works by narrowing the blood vessels. This helps to clear and prevent the symptoms of congestion. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their docto Continue reading >>

Who Should Not Take Claritin-d?

Who Should Not Take Claritin-d?

Claritin-D (12-hour or 24-hour) should not be taken by people with kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, glaucoma, enlarged prostate, thyroid problems, urination problems or heart disease, without first discussing it with your doctor. Do not use this medication without letting your doctor know that you use an MAOI (monoamine oxidase inhibitor), since the combination can have life-threatening results. People with following medical conditions should not use Claritin-D: Central nervous system stimulation with convulsions or cardiovascular failure may occur. Children under two years of age should not be given this medication. Chemical Toxins Relationship Abuse Diabetes Complications Body Contouring Your Lifestyle The Five Senses Stages Of Colon Cancer Patient Education For Improving Rx Drug Adherence Your Mind Male Reproductive System Parts Parenting Teens Morning Sickness & Pregnancy Mental Health Therapies Sharecare Bladder Cancer Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Digestive Diseases Schizophrenia Hydrocephalus Conception Achieved (Pregnancy) Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. treating lung conditions and lung diseases such as allergies, asthma, bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, lung disease, smoking cessation. Continue reading >>

Interaction Between Pharmaceutical Drugs And Cannabis

Interaction Between Pharmaceutical Drugs And Cannabis

Patients being treated for certain conditions should be mindful of the possible interactions between cannabis and the pharmaceutical drugs they already take for their pathology. The effect of prescription drugs can be increased or weakened when combined with cannabinoids. In some cases, these interactions can simply prevent patients to deal with their normal daily activities requiring alertness. In others, the combined effects might lead to more serious conditions. The vast majority of patients can easily tolerate the combined effects between medical cannabis and the pharmaceutical prescriptions. Occasionally, cannabis can cause minor side effects, while sometimes these combined effects have to be taken more seriously. Cannabis alone has never caused death, and very few cases are reported of major diseases from acute cannabis use. Despite that, combining different drugs or substances can have unpredictable effects on any kind of patient. THE TRANQUILIZING EFFECT ADDS UP Cannabis' natural compounds add up their action on our nervous system to the one of many pain medications, resulting in a strengthening of these substances’ effects. This strong interaction is not completely predictable in its display. As an example, patients need to be cautious about the additive effect of cannabis and opiates pain medications, which can amplify the depression of our central nervous system. Since the central nervous system controls heart rate and respiration, a depressive effect can lead to death. Despite this adverse interaction, cannabis can help patients with chronic pain reducing their opiate use. Cannabis adds its effect to sedative drugs, such as sleeping pills in the class of cyclopyrrolones, or "Z-drugs", or other tranquilizers, like Valium. All these chemicals' compounds incr Continue reading >>

Will You Have Diabetes With Claritin Reditabs - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Diabetes With Claritin Reditabs - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 25 year old man who takes Lamotrigine, Lyrica, Abilify NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Take Claritin

Can A Diabetic Take Claritin

HI XXXXXXX Page (age 79) I am pre diabetic (managing with diet) and taking Ramipril & Amlodipine . I also have a post nasal drip the I have also been managing with diet. However I did take a Claritin ... , cholelethiasis and more. I take donepezil, Aspirin, trazodone, low doze Naltrexone,claritine. I am 75 years old ...), not diabetic. Can I take Atorvastatin 10 mg, I prescribed recently if I had blood in my urine? I have chronic ... I'm type 1 diabetic. I use Novolog fast acting insulin ... Does it hurt me to take Claritin D for my allergies? ... Can i take a sleeping aid while i just took claritin pill ... that is supposed to stay dry and in place for a week. I have my granddaughters chewable Claritin in house....but also take trazadone 50mg at bedtime. Can I take both? ... on the floor after a party). If so, why would a person want to take them (enhanced effedta, hallucinations, etc.)? My inclination is, it would be used after someone is high to help them go to sleep since taking ... and gave her a dose of Claritin for kids about an hour and a half ago before we noticed the fever. Since we noticed the fever we figure it s not allergies. Can she take anything else? ... but this medicine causes drowsiness. Now I know Claritin has non drowsy drug. Up until now I can not find side effects about this medication. Can you please tell me whether it is absolutely safe to take it. ... the sneezing and now I have a bad case of laryngitis. Should I take a claritin or Allegra before work ... At allergy Drs. suggestion, I am taking the generic brand of Claritin in the morning, Singular in the evening and now dermatologist suggested taking Zyrtec at noon. Do these all do different things? What ... What are the side effects of Generic Claritin? my father s now taking the generic fo Continue reading >>

Post Nasal Drip Cough Medicine That Actually Works

Post Nasal Drip Cough Medicine That Actually Works

Post Nasal Drip Cough Medicine that Actually Works Home /Post Nasal Drip Cough Medicine that Actually Works Post Nasal Drip Cough Medicine that Actually Works People who have a post nasal drip cough should realize their condition is now being called upper airway cough syndrome (UACS). This is a situation where a person has a cough for a long period of time with nasal congestion. It is often caused by mucus dripping down the back of their throat. This causes a person to have a regular sensation they must clear their throat. UACS can cause a person to have a hoarse voice as well as wake up in the morning with something noticeable in the back of their throat. UACS can result from a person having an allergic or a nonallergic reaction to something in their environment. It could also be the result of sinusitis. Hereare some effectivepost nasal drip cough treatments that actually work: For the first line of postnasal drip cough treatment it is recommended you use intranasal steroids beforeoral antihistamines. Youcan now conveniently purchase these twotypes of postnasal drip cough medicine over the counter: Nasacort Allergy (triamcinolone acetonide) and Flonase Allergy (luticasone propionate) can be purchased without a prescription from a doctor. You maymay feel the effects within a few hoursand it mayeliminate your cough after a few days. In which case you can continue to use itfor up to 3 months. Another type of good post nasal drip cough medicine relief are antihistamine nasal sprays. Azelastine ( Astepro or Astelin ) is able to decrease the impact of a cough and runny nose; Atrovent ( ipratropium bromide ) nasal spray is just aseffective. Please note that Astelin may cause drowsiness but ipratopium bromide does not. These do provide post nasal drip cough relief but will ca Continue reading >>

Can I Take Contac® Cold + Flu With Other Medications?

Can I Take Contac® Cold + Flu With Other Medications?

Drug interaction precautions appear on the back label of every Contac® Cold + Flu box. When in doubt, it is best to check with your doctor or pharmacist. As stated on the label, do not use Contac Cold + Flu with any other drug containing acetaminophen (prescription or nonprescription). If you are not sure whether a drug contains acetaminophen, ask a doctor or pharmacist. Do not use Contac Cold + Flu if you are now taking a prescription monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) (certain drugs for depression, psychiatric, or emotional conditions, or Parkinson’s disease), or for 2 weeks after stopping the MAOI drug. If you do not know if your prescription drug contains an MAOI, ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking this product. Ask a doctor before use if you have: liver disease heart disease glaucoma diabetes high blood pressure thyroid disease trouble urinating due to an enlarged prostate gland a breathing problem such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking: the blood thinning drug warfarin sedatives or tranquilizers Frequently Asked Questions Continue reading >>

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

I heard people with diabetes need to be careful with allergy medications. Are there allergy medications I cannot take with my diabetes medication? Zyrtec® (cetirizine), Claritin® (loratadine), Allegra® (fexofenadine), and Benadryl® (diphenhydramine) are all allergy medications that should not affect your blood sugar when used by themselves. However, these antihistamines are often paired with pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine are both decongestants. These two medications can cause an increase in blood sugar when taken with diabetes medication and should be avoided, if possible, in people with diabetes. Be sure to read labels on cold and allergy medications, and be careful when the letter D is added to a medication name, such as Zyrtec-D or Claritin-D. This means that it contains pseudoephedrine. Continue reading >>

What Allergy Medicines Can I Safely Take If I Have Heart Disease Or High Blood Pressure?

What Allergy Medicines Can I Safely Take If I Have Heart Disease Or High Blood Pressure?

Oklahoma Heart Institute Director of Interventional Laboratories, Dr. Wayne Leimbach, shares insights on allergies, heart disease and high blood pressure on our blog today. Springtime brings not only beautiful weather and beautiful flowers, but it also brings high pollen counts and suffering to people with allergies. Many people often ask what allergy medicines can I safely take if I have heart disease or high blood pressure. Many allergy medications include decongestants that can raise blood pressure, create palpitations and interfere with some other heart medications. Medications that often can be safely used by people with significant allergies include nasal corticosteroids. In addition, antihistamines are very effective. The antihistamines include fexofenadine (Allegra), cetirizine (Zyrtec), loratadine (Claritin) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl). Often manufactures will include a decongestant with the antihistamines in order to provide additional control of the runny nose often seen with allergies. Manufacturers will often indicate which of the antihistamines also contain a decongestant by adding the letter D to the name of the medicine. These decongestants can be phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine or oxymetazoline. For patients who have high blood pressure, rhythm problems (palpitations), or who have severe blockages in their blood vessels to their heart, these decongestants have the potential to cause problems. Decongestants can raise blood pressure or stimulate fast heart rhythms. Anyone with heart conditions or high blood pressure, before taking medications that include phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine, should consult their doctor to see if they can safely take such medicines. Therefore, advertised medicines such as Allegra, Zyrtec, or Claritin should be safe for mo Continue reading >>

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