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Can Diabetics Subtract Fiber From Carbs?

Do You Subtract Fiber From Your Carb Count?

Do You Subtract Fiber From Your Carb Count?

DO you subtract fiber from your carb count? DO you subtract fiber from your carb count? That gives us the "net carbs" correct? I have always done that as that is how I was taught when following LCHF. To be honest ~ I have really no clue why. It cuts down on the carb count because the fiber keeps us full longer? Hell. I really have no clue and now I wonder if I should be doing that?? Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy I use insulin but have never looked at anything other than TOTAL carbs. I don't care if some are fiber or sugar or whatever - just give me the darn Total and I'll work with it. I practice the KISS method of life - Fiber isn't supposed to be that digestible. That's why it's fiber. I subtract it. But for others subtracting it does not work. It's a "your mileage may vary" kind of topic. Supposedly, fiber is not digestible and does not affect blood sugars. If I have a glass of hot water & psyllium (5 carbs) I deduct the 5 since psyllium does what it does...so well In my country, the nutrition panels are required to include the net carbs. But they're not required to include total carbs, so they don't. HbA1c 1st November 2017 31mmol/mol (5.0%) In several of the Low Carb Friends cookbooks, they put the net carbs and if you are counting fiber grams (to reach 25-30per day), you don't know what the fiber is unless you do some sleuthing In several of the Low Carb Friends cookbooks, they put the net carbs and if you are counting fiber grams (to reach 25-30per day), you don't know what the fiber is unless you do some sleuthing Is the sleuthing kind of like Changing a serving size and then having to calculate how many carbs we're actually eating in the new portion? I don't subtract. Most things either spike me or not, with little bearing on the fib Continue reading >>

Do I Subtract Fiber From Carbohydrates?

Do I Subtract Fiber From Carbohydrates?

Q: In the past, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommended that when a serving of food has 5 or more grams of fiber, people should subtract that number from the total grams of carbohydrates, because fiber is not broken down into glucose. I dont see this mentioned anymore, even in resources that incorporate high-fiber foods into diabetes diets. Now, more information discusses the glycemic index of high-fiber foods instead. Are people supposed to count and cover with insulin all of the carbohydrates in a serving of black beans, 23 grams, or subtract the 15 grams of fiber, and say it is 8 grams carbs? A: You are correct and the example is a good one. The ADA recommendations on adjusting carbohydrate calculation for high-fiber foods remain the same. Foods high in fiber are a healthy addition to a meal plan. Since fiber is not completely digested and absorbed, a high-fiber meal would not provide as much available carbohydrate as a low-fiber meal of similar total carbohydrate content. A high-fiber food is one that contains 5 or more grams of dietary fiber per serving. When there are 5 or more grams of fiber per serving, subtract them from the total grams of carbohydrate to determine how much carbohydrate is available. For example, a breakfast cereal containing 28 grams of total carbohydrate and 6 grams of dietary fiber can be counted as 22 grams [28 6 = 22] of available carbohydrate. Vice President, Health Care and Education Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available throug Continue reading >>

Total Carbs And Net Carbs: Know The Difference For Better Diabetes Control

Total Carbs And Net Carbs: Know The Difference For Better Diabetes Control

It’s helpful to know the difference between a food’s total grams of carbohydrate, and net grams of carbohydrate, since only net carbs affect blood sugar. Our body generates energy for itself by turning food carbohydrates into a bio-fuel called glucose. The glucose triggers a release of the hormone insulin that transports the glucose where it’s needed. If we eat more carbohydrates than our body requires for energy, some of the excess is stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen; the rest is preserved as fat. Yet, not all carbohydrate can be used as fuel or stored for future use. Fiber is a carbohydrate that cannot be digested by the body, or made into glucose. Until it’s eliminated, fiber remains in the digestive tract where it slows down the absorption of other nutrients, aids in the elimination process, and feeds our healthy gut bacteria. Fiber has no effect on insulin levels. Determining Net Carbs Net carbs is a term for the digestible carbohydrates that actually enter our bloodstream, raise glucose levels, and instigate insulin release. To determine net carbs you simply subtract a food’s indigestible fiber grams of carbohydrate from its total grams of carbohydrate: Total grams of carbohydrate (digestible and indigestible carbs) Minus the grams of fiber (the indigestible carbs) Equals grams of net carbs (the digestible carbs that elevate blood sugar) One cup of cooked broccoli, for instance, has 11.2 grams of total carbohydrate, and 5.1 grams of fiber. So, to calculate net carbs: 11.2 total grams carbohydrate (digestible and indigestible carbs) minus 5.1 grams of fiber (indigestible carbs) equals 6.1 grams net carbs (digestible carbs that elevate blood sugar) This simple equation makes it easy to see how 15 total carb grams of fiber-less pastas or snack fo Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Counting ''net'' Carbs

Eating With Diabetes: Counting ''net'' Carbs

Eating with Diabetes: Counting ''Net'' Carbs By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 7/5/2011 Since low carbohydrate diets became popular, the phrase "net carbs" has become a fairly regular fixture on the labels of food products. But, if you are not familiar with the term you may be wondering what in the world it means! There are three types of carbohydrates: starches, sugars and fiber. All three types of carbs are added up and listed as Total Carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts Label of a food product. The concept of net carbs is based on the fact that, although it is considered a carbohydrate, dietary fiber is not digested the same way the other two types of carbohydrates (starches and sugars) are. While starches and sugars are broken down into glucose (blood sugar), fiber isn't treated the same way. The fiber you eat passes through the body undigested and helps add bulk to your stool ( among other benefits ). The indigestibility of fiber is where the idea of "net carbs" comes in. In fact, sometimes, net carbs are sometimes referred to as "digestible carbs.'' In recent years, food manufacturers have started including net carbs in addition to total carbs when labeling products. Many foods proudly display net carbs on their labels to entice both low-carb diet fans and people with diabetes. While the concept of net carbs can be utilized in diabetes meal planning, read labels with a discerning eye. At present there are no mandated rules for calculating or labeling net carbs on food packages. The FDA does not regulate or oversee the use of these terms, and exactly what is listed as "net carbs" can vary dramatically from product to product. Some products calculate net carbs as total carbohydrates minus dietary fiber, other labels reflect net c Continue reading >>

What Are Net Carbs?

What Are Net Carbs?

I have type 1 diabetes, and my son recently gave me a package of sugar-free hard candy that was labeled "0 net carbs." The back of the package said, "To calculate net carbs, subtract the sugar alcohols from the total carbs in the product, because sugar alcohols have minimal impact on blood sugar." I am concerned and confused about this labeling. Continue reading >>

Total Carbohydrate, Sugars And Fibre?

Total Carbohydrate, Sugars And Fibre?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My first post - but a lurker since XMas eve 2013 (diagnosed type 2 on Xmas eve!) So, since my diagnosis I have changed my eating habits to a Low carb diet and have had great succes so far - lost around 15kg in weight since XMas eve 2013. However, I am still a little bit confused about interpruting the nutritional labels on the food items I purchase. Up until now I have been focussed soley on the total Carb value but recently I came across the concept of Net Carbs, if I have understood correctly this is when you subtract the value against the fibre from the total carb, the resulting value is the amont of carbs that will effect blood sugar levels? Body cant digest fibre so this value can be duducted from the total carb content? As an example I have just googled Flax Seed nutritional facts 100g and come up with the following: my understanding is that all carbs will be converted to glucose.... No, fibre is a cellulose based carbohydrate and we don't produce any enzymes that digest it. Typically ruminants like cows break cellulose down, but it takes a long time for them tob do it. That's why they spend all day chewing. In addition, there are other alpha carbs which we do not digest properly. These are typically legumes which are high in oligosaccharides. Again we don't produce the necessary enzymes to digest them but they do get partially broken down by bacteria in the gut. Hence they cause flatulence. They tend to also be high in fibre and are generally good for diabetics. Agree with Avocado about noting the spelling but also, US labels are by the serving size, European by the 100g. US say Carbs with fiber underneath as it is part of the Carb count. In Eu Continue reading >>

Are You Doing Carb Counting All Wrong?

Are You Doing Carb Counting All Wrong?

While other people may simply feel guilty after downing an entire bowl of cheesy pasta and half a pan of brownies, diabetics pay for it with unstable blood sugars and the need for another insulin poke. This is why a carb-conscious approach to meals is necessary. Why Count Carbs? For diabetics, counting carbohydrates is a way to match insulin requirements to the foods they eat and drink. For Type 2 diabetics who don’t require insulin injections, carb counting is a way to monitor how carbs affect their blood glucose levels and to help manage their weight and medication intake. Although it takes patience and diligence at first, once you learn how to count carbs correctly, you’ll find it much easier to add a variety and combination of foods into your meal plan. This means you can easily switch out one frozen dinner for another and know exactly how much insulin you’ll need. And as any diabetic will tell you, better blood glucose management means better overall health. Total VS Net Carbs – The Right and Wrong Way to Count. It should go without saying that counting carbs is better than not counting carbs. That being said, if you’re going to count them, you should be aware there is a right and wrong way to do it—or better, there is a “right” and “more right” way of counting carbs. While total carbs can predict the blood glucose impact of any food you eat, there may be other components of the food that will, at the exact same time, reduce that impact. For example, fiber is a common component of food that actually reduces the net effect of the carbs in that food. This is why fruit will always have less of an impact on blood sugar than cake. Fiber should actually be subtracted from, not added to, your insulin dosage because it reduces the overall effect of the Continue reading >>

Does Fiber Cancel Out Other Carbohydrates?

Does Fiber Cancel Out Other Carbohydrates?

Small bowl of cabbage salad.Photo Credit: YelenaYemchuk/iStock/Getty Images Does Fiber Cancel Out Other Carbohydrates? Aglaee Jacob is a registered dietitian. She has experience working with people who have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity issues. Jacob obtained a bachelor of science and a master of science, both in nutrition, from Laval University in Quebec City, Canada. If you are keeping an eye on your carb intake to control your blood sugar levels or weight, you are probably familiar with carb counting. Although fiber does not "cancel out carbs" -- that is, you can't eat a bowl of ice cream and cancel it out by eating a cup of oat bran -- the fiber in a food is considered part of the total carb count. That means, if you're counting the type of carbs that affect your blood sugar, you can subtract the grams of fiber from the total grams of carbohydrate to get a more accurate picture. When you look at a nutrition facts table, you will typically find the suggested serving size at the top of the table and the grams of total carbohydrates per serving lower in the table. Below the total carbs, you will see the fiber content listed in grams. Fiber is accounted for as part of the total carbohydrates found in a food. In other words, it's listed twice -- once in the listing under "fiber" and once as part of the total carbohydrate count, which also includes starches and sugars. Although starches, sugars and fiber are all part of the total carbohydrates, they are not handled the same way in your body. Sugars and starches elevate your blood sugar levels and can be stored as fat. by contrast, fiber is not absorbed at all and stays in your gastrointestinal tract until it moves through and is eliminated. If you are watching your blood sugar levels or weigh Continue reading >>

Net Carbs Vs Total Carbs: Which Is Better For Blood Sugar Control?

Net Carbs Vs Total Carbs: Which Is Better For Blood Sugar Control?

Kathleen says: “I am unclear about net carbs vs total carbs. I eat a lot of veggies, which increases my total carbs to over 100 grams per day, but my net carbs are usually between 40-60. Should I focus more on the total or the net carbs eaten? I have been diagnosed with prediabetes, for several years now. Thank you!” This is a fantastic question! If you look around the low carb websites online, the Atkins diet, ketogenic diet, or low carb products like Atkins, you'll see that oftentimes they use”net carbs.” But what about for diabetes, is net carbs better than calculating your total carb intake? That's exactly what we're here to workshop together now so you can get a better understanding about how total carbs and net carbs effect you and your blood sugar levels. Net Carbs vs Total Carbs: What’s the Difference? To explain it simply, total carbohydrates is obviously the total amount of carbs contained in any food item. Whereas the net carbs removes certain elements from the total carb count to provide you with the “net effect” of those carb-containing foods on the body. How to Determine Net Carbs You can use this simple formula to calculate the number of net carbs in any given food: Total carbs minus fiber = net carbs Let’s break this formula down using an example. First, check out the nutrition facts label from a can of green beans. A serving of these beans contains 7 grams of total carbohydrates. Now look a little closer at the label and you will notice that a serving of green beans also contains 3.4 grams of dietary fiber. So if we plug these numbers into the formula, it looks like this… 7 g (total carbs) – 3.4 g (fiber) = 3.6 g (net carbs) When you subtract the fiber content it “cancels out” some of the total carbs, and you're left with the “ Continue reading >>

How Do You Do Fiber?

How Do You Do Fiber?

An article in the March/April 2009 issue of Diabetes Self-Management, entitled Counting Carbohydrates Like a Pro and written by Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, has provoked a lot of comments and questions from readers. Many of the questions concern how to deal with fiber when counting the carbohydrate in a meal or snack. In the article, Scheiner recommends subtracting all the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate before calculating the carbohydrate grams (or choices, if you prefer) in a meal. But many readers have heard different advice on this, and they want to know why. One reader, for example, said she thought the correct thing to do was to subtract half the grams of fiber. Another reader said that a dietitian had instructed him to subtract only the amount of fiber over 5 grams. I found that the 2007 edition of Choose Your Foods: Exchange Lists for Diabetes, published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), recommends subtracting half the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate when eating foods with more than 5 grams of fiber per serving. So if a serving of food contained 8 grams of fiber, you would subtract 4 grams. If the food contained fewer than 5 grams of fiber per serving, you would subtract none of them before calculating the carbohydrate grams or choices in your meal. Another consumer guide, the American Dietetic Association Guide to Eating Right When You Have Diabetes, published in 2003, says that you can subtract all the fiber from the total carbohydrate but that doing so may only be necessary if your meal contains 5 or more grams of fiber. It goes on to say, And it may only be necessary for those who are being precise with their carbohydrate intake and adjusting a rapid- or short-acting insulin based on how much carbohydrate they are eating. Similarl Continue reading >>

Taking A Closer Look At Labels

Taking A Closer Look At Labels

You can use the information on the Nutrition Facts label to compare foods and make better choices. These food labels are especially helpful if you use carbohydrate counting to plan your meals. Start by looking at the serving size. All of the information on the label is based on the serving size listed. If you eat more, that means you'll be getting more calories, carbohydrates, etc. The information on the left side of the label provides total amounts per serving of the different nutrients. These are shown in grams which are abbreviated as g; or in milligrams, shown as mg. Use total amounts to compare labels of similar foods. Nutrients that you'll want to limit are listed toward the top of the label. (So choose foods with less calories, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sodium. Also, try to select foods with more fiber, which is listed lower on the label under total carbohdyrate. If you are trying to lose or maintain your weight, the number of calories you eat is important. To lose weight, you need to eat fewer calories than your body burns. Use labels to compare similar products to determine which contains fewer calories. To find an estimate of how many calories you need each day, check out our page How Many Calories Do I Need . For an even better estimate of the calories you need, talk with a registered dietitian . Total carbohydrate on the label includes all types of carbohydrate - sugar, complex carbohydrate and fiber. Because all types of carbohydrate can affect blood glucose, it's important to use the total grams when counting carbs or choosing foods to include, rather than just the grams of sugar. If you look only at the sugar number, you may end up overeating foods such as grains that have no natural or added sugar, but do contain a lot of carbohydrate. Y Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Counting ''net'' Carbs

Eating With Diabetes: Counting ''net'' Carbs

Since low carbohydrate diets became popular, the phrase "net carbs" has become a fairly regular fixture on the labels of food products. But, if you are not familiar with the term you may be wondering what in the world it means! There are three types of carbohydrates: starches, sugars and fiber. All three types of carbs are added up and listed as Total Carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts Label of a food product. The concept of net carbs is based on the fact that, although it is considered a carbohydrate, dietary fiber is not digested the same way the other two types of carbohydrates (starches and sugars) are. While starches and sugars are broken down into glucose (blood sugar), fiber isn't treated the same way. The fiber you eat passes through the body undigested and helps add bulk to your stool (among other benefits). The indigestibility of fiber is where the idea of "net carbs" comes in. In fact, sometimes, net carbs are sometimes referred to as "digestible carbs.'' In recent years, food manufacturers have started including net carbs in addition to total carbs when labeling products. Many foods proudly display net carbs on their labels to entice both low-carb diet fans and people with diabetes. While the concept of net carbs can be utilized in diabetes meal planning, read labels with a discerning eye. At present there are no mandated rules for calculating or labeling net carbs on food packages. The FDA does not regulate or oversee the use of these terms, and exactly what is listed as "net carbs" can vary dramatically from product to product. Some products calculate net carbs as total carbohydrates minus dietary fiber, other labels reflect net carbs as total carbohydrates minus dietary fiber minus sugar alcohols, and still others calculate net carbs as total carbohydra Continue reading >>

Understanding Fiber

Understanding Fiber

Fiber does not affect your blood sugar levels. Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body can’t digest, so you should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate. On Nutrition Facts food labels, the grams of dietary fiber are already included in the total carbohydrate count. But because fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body can’t digest, it does not affect your blood sugar levels. You should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate. Here’s the best advice about fiber: For people with diabetes that are treated with insulin, getting the most accurate carbohydrate count may help control blood sugars better. To summarize – you need to take the total amount of carbohydrate in a serving MINUS the carbohydrate in the fiber. Now, let’s practice using the sample food label: The dietary fiber is 5 grams per serving. Count this product as 5 grams of carbohydrate (10 grams total carbohydrate minus 5 grams dietary fiber equals 5 grams of carbohydrate). Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Understanding Carbohydrates, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

What Are “net Carbs”?

What Are “net Carbs”?

I am finding that some products list “net carbs,” which is different from the grams of carbohydrates listed in the nutrition label. Which should I use as a guide to calculate my insulin dosage? Continue reading >>

Do You Subtract Fiber From Your Carb Count?

Do You Subtract Fiber From Your Carb Count?

DO you subtract fiber from your carb count? D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 I have never understood why this even matters if you are not using insulin, what are you trying to match? If it's to keep a record of your carb totals for a day then subtracting the fiber or half of the fiber is not a true total. Because they are tracking how many carbs they are consuming. Since insoluble fiber passes through without being digested, they aren't really "consumed", and shouldn't count in any totals. "Net carbs was a phrase coined by the food industry when low carb diets became popular about a decade ago, and doesnt have a formal definition. Its not a term recognized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or American Diabetes Association (ADA). Net carbs usually subtract fiber, sugar alcohols, and glycerin from the total carbohydrates. This can be misleading for anyone counting carbs and using insulin to carb ratio to bolus for food." When I weigh my apples in the fall, how much fiber should I subtract....it does not have label to tell me. LOL Continue reading >>

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