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Can Diabetics Have Vinegar?

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Part 1 of 4 Overview Type 2 diabetes is a preventable and chronic disease that affects how your body controls sugar (glucose) in your blood. Medications, diet, and exercise are the standard treatments. But recent studies vouch for something you can find in most kitchen cabinets too: apple cider vinegar. Over 9 percent of Americans have type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If apple cider vinegar has potential as a natural treatment, that would be good news indeed. Part 2 of 4 While a number of studies have looked at the link between apple cider vinegar and blood sugar management, they are usually small, with varying results. “There have been several small studies evaluating the effects of apple cider vinegar, and the results are mixed,” said Dr. Maria Pena, an endocrinologist in New York. “For example, there was one small study done in rats showing that apple cider vinegar helped lower LDL and A1C levels. But the limitation to this study is that it was only done in rats, not humans.” One study from researchers at Arizona State University found that taking 20 grams of apple cider vinegar diluted in 40 grams of water, with 1 teaspoon of saccharine, could lower blood sugar after meals. Another study found that taking apple cider vinegar before bed helped moderate blood sugar upon waking up. But both studies were small, looking only at 19 and 11 participants, respectively. Another study that looked at apple cider vinegar’s impact on type 1 diabetes found that it could actually worsen glycemic control, according to Pena. “The take-home message is that until a large, randomized control trial is done, it is difficult to ascertain the true benefits of taking apple cider vinegar,” she said. Part 3 of 4 Dilute apple cide Continue reading >>

Vinegar And Blood Sugar Monitoring In Diabetes Diabetes Action

Vinegar And Blood Sugar Monitoring In Diabetes Diabetes Action

As most regular readers know, I am committed to helping people with diabetes find safe, non-drug approaches to lowering their blood sugar. One promising and simple approach is the use of vinegar in food, or used as a supplement to diet, physical activity and stress management. But is it really as easy as taking vinegar, or using more vinegar in food? How is it that this simple, inexpensive substance can be used this way? Well, in order to answer this question, I reviewed the scientific literature and provide a summary below of our current understanding. I hope you are inspired to leave the sweets behind and “go sour” instead! One of the first studies to investigate the effect of vinegar on blood sugar was published in 1998 by Liljeberg et al. from the United Kingdom1. In their study, they randomly assigned healthy adults to one of two meals, a white bread challenge or a white bread challenge plus vinegar. The group also measured how quickly certain marker compounds entered the blood stream when administered with and without vinegar. Their results were notable in several ways: 1) Adding vinegar to the white bread challenge meal significantly reduced the average blood sugar concentration for several hours after eating; 2) Adding vinegar also reduced the insulin response after the challenge; and 3) the marker compound appeared in the blood more slowly with the added vinegar, suggesting the vinegar may work by slowing down how quickly food leaves the stomach (also known as “gastic emptying”). Although this study was not performed in people with diabetes, it supports a basic mechanism of action of vinegar, which may be helpful to people with diabetes, and clearly demonstrated the concept that vinegar could be helpful to lower blood sugar after meals rich in high gly Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: A Cure Or An Aid?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: A Cure Or An Aid?

If you’ve been searching for various remedies to help manage blood glucose levels, you’ve probably come across the suggestion to add apple cider vinegar into your meal plan. But does this so-called natural remedy really work? It turns out that using vinegar as a treatment for health aliments, such as infections and stomachaches, has been practiced for centuries in cultures throughout the world. But it was a Japanese study that suggested apple cider vinegar may promote weight loss that thrust it into the spotlight for people looking to slim down or better manage their diabetes. Since then, other researchers have studied this vinegar’s impact on appetite and blood glucose management. “There is some emerging evidence that suggests apple cider vinegar may have certain potential benefits for people with diabetes,” says Susan Weiner, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes 365: Tips for Living Well. But she adds, “all of the studies in this area are small and have varying results.” Mona Morstein, ND, author of Master Your Diabetes: A Comprehensive Integrative Approach for Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, also shared concern regarding the research so far. “Studies done with small groups is always something to be wary of when expanding findings to millions of others,” says Morstein, noting that, at the same time, the results in the studies conducted to date have all been positive. Apple Cider Vinegar for Diabetes: What Studies Say Controlling blood sugar is important for people with diabetes, and some research suggests apple cider vinegar may help do the job. According to a study published in the journal Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, consuming vinegar with complex carbohydrates may reduce post-meal blood glucose levels by as much as 20 percent. Additional research Continue reading >>

Vinegar & Diabetes | Vinegar Helps The Blood Sugar Go Down. - Dlife

Vinegar & Diabetes | Vinegar Helps The Blood Sugar Go Down. - Dlife

A Spoonful of Vinegar Helps the Sugar Go Down Strange as it might seem, including some vinegar in your diet might improve yourblood sugar. Though vinegar has a bit of a checkered pastit has too often been hyped inweight-lossdiets and miracle curessolid research has clearly shown that it can improve glycemic control. Vinegar has been widely consumed throughout Asia, and is considered a functional food. There is now modern research backing the ancient use of vinegar, particularly for keeping blood sugar levels under control, for both normal individuals and those with diabetes. The biologically active constituent of vinegar is acetic acid, which is also the source of the liquids lip-puckering pungency. Acetic acid inhibits the activity of severalcarbohydrate-digesting enzymes, including amylase, sucrase, maltase, and lactase. As a result, when vinegar is present in the intestines, some sugars and starches temporarily pass through without being digested, so they exert less of an impact upon blood sugar levels. Research tracking hemoglobin A1C in people with type 2 diabetes found that a daily dose ofvinegar improved glycemic control, and was superior to dill pickles or vinegar in pill form. Because taking a teaspoon or two of vinegar alone seems to cause burping and acid reflux in a lot of people, its a good idea to combinevinegar with food. The easiest way of doing this is to useoil-and-vinegar salad dressings: balsamic, red wine, apple cider, or any flavored vinegars (avoid the fruity, sweet ones, of course, or you may cancel out the benefit.) When making the dressing, use about 50 to 75 percent vinegar, and add some mincedgarlic, dried oregano, and basilor stir in a little Dijon mustard.You can also try vinaigrette dressings drizzled over steamed veggies such as cauliflo Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar Using Just Apple Cider Vinegar

How To Lower Blood Sugar Using Just Apple Cider Vinegar

By pH health care professionals Vinegar comes from the French word vinaigre meaning sour wine. It can be made from almost any fermented carbohydrate - wine, molasses, dates, pears, berries and apples have all been used to make vinegar, with apple cider vinegar being one of the most popular kinds. The benefits to apple cider vinegar are abundant. Proponents use it for everything from curing hiccups to alleviating cold symptoms, and claim it can help them fight diabetes, cancer, heart problems, high cholesterol and weight issues. Studies are beginning to affirm some of the benefits, and no doubt apple cider vinegar will be the subject of numerous studies in the future. There is evidence that fermented foods such as apple cider vinegar containing lactic acid or acetic acid can lower blood sugar (glucose) by helping store excess glucose in the liver. This reduces the body’s rate of glucose production and absorption. A 2004 study that appeared in Diabetes Care measured the effects of vinegar on blood glucose after a meal. Blood glucose levels were taken one to two hours after a meal. The participants were insulin sensitive (normal response), insulin resistant (pre-diabetic), or Type 2 diabetics. They were required to either drink apple cider vinegar or water with a sugar substitute before eating a buttered bagel and drinking orange juice. The insulin-resistant group that drank the vinegar before their meal had increased insulin sensitivity for an hour after eating. The Type 2 diabetes group also saw a slight improvement, but the biggest effect was seen in people whose insulin response was normal and those who were insulin resistant. This study demonstrated that vinegar does seem to significantly improve post-meal insulin sensitivity in people who are insulin resistant, whi Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple cider vinegar has a long history as a home remedy, used to treat everything from a sore throat to varicose veins. But there’s not much science to support the claims. Still, in recent years, some researchers have been taking a closer look at apple cider vinegar and its possible benefits. It’s mostly apple juice, but adding yeast turns the fruit sugar into alcohol -- this is fermentation. Bacteria turn the alcohol into acetic acid. That’s what gives vinegar its sour taste and strong smell. Vinegar’s used in cooking, baking, salad dressings, and as a preservative. There’s a lot of acid in it, so drinking vinegar straight isn’t recommended. And it can cause serious problems if you have a lot of it. If you’re looking to take some for health reasons, most people recommend adding one to two tablespoons to water or tea. Vinegar has been used as a remedy since the days of Hippocrates. The ancient Greek doctor treated wounds with it. In recent years, people have explored apple cider vinegar as a way to lose weight, improve heart health, and even treat dandruff. Many of these claims aren’t supported by modern research. But some studies have found that acetic acid -- which gives vinegar its distinctive taste and smell -- may help with a variety of conditions: Japanese scientists found that drinking vinegar might help reduce obesity. One small study found that vinegar improved blood sugar and insulin levels in a group of people with type 2 diabetes. Vinegar also has chemicals known as polyphenols. They’re antioxidants that can curb cell damage that can lead to other diseases, such as cancer. But studies on whether vinegar actually lowers your chances of having cancer are mixed. Did we mention it’s highly acidic? Drinking a lot of apple cider vinegar can dam Continue reading >>

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

2 tablespoons of vinegar before a meal even as part of a vinaigrette salad dressing—will dramatically reduce the spike in blood concentrations of insulin and glucose that come after a meal. A Spoonful of Vinegar Helps the Sugar Go Down Carol Johnston is a professor of nutrition at Arizona State University’s East campus. When she started developing menus to help prevent and control diabetes, she began with a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet worked amazingly well, but it involved major changes from the way people usually eat. Johnston feared they would give up and start downing Twinkies in no time. She wondered if there was an alternative. Johnston struck gold while reading through some older studies on diabetes. Actually, she struck vinegar. Her studies indicate that 2 tablespoons of vinegar before a meal—perhaps, as part of a vinaigrette salad dressing—will dramatically reduce the spike in blood concentrations of insulin and glucose that come after a meal. In people with type 2 diabetes, these spikes can be excessive and can foster complications, including heart disease In Johnston’s initial study, about one-third of the 29 volunteers had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, another third had signs that they could become diabetic, and the rest were healthy. The scientists gave each participant the vinegar dose or a placebo to drink immediately before they ate a high-carbohydrate breakfast consisting of orange juice, a bagel, and butter. A week later, each volunteer came back for the opposite premeal treatment and then the same breakfast. After both meals, the researchers sampled blood from the participants. Although all three groups in the study had better blood readings after meals begun with vinegar cocktails, the people with signs of future dia Continue reading >>

Vinegar For Diabetes? Yes!

Vinegar For Diabetes? Yes!

Vinegar is a two-cents-per-dose medication. It reliably lowers after-meal and fasting blood sugar in many people. Yet few people with diabetes take it, maybe because we don’t know enough about it. So here’s a quick overview. First, what is vinegar? The word “vinegar” comes from the French words for “sour wine.” According to the website How Stuff Works, “Vinegar is a dilute solution of acetic acid that results from a two-step fermentation process.” In the first step, sugar is fermented into alcohol, usually by yeast. This is how beer and wine are made. Any natural source of sugar, such as any fruit, grain, or starch, can be made into alcohol this way. In the second step, the alcoholic liquid is exposed to bacteria called “acetobacters.” In the presence of oxygen, the bacteria turn the alcoholic solution into vinegar. The vinegar is usually named after the liquid it started with; for example, “red wine vinegar” or “apple cider vinegar.” Acetic acid gives vinegar its sour taste. Depending on what sugar was used to start the process, there may be other acids, such as malic acid, in the vinegar. The acids are called “short-chain fatty acids” (SCFAs). SCFAs affect our bodies’ use of sugar in various ways and are an important source of energy for people who eat them. Vinegar was probably discovered 5,000 years ago when people were storing wine. Sometimes the wine would go sour over time, but the sour wine turned out quite useful. People found they could use it for cooking, for skin care, and for medicine. According to the How Stuff Works article, “[vinegar’s] healing virtues are extolled in records of the Babylonians, and the great Greek physician Hippocrates reportedly used it as an antibiotic. In Asia, early samurai warriors believed vin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Control: Is Vinegar A Promising Candidate To Help Achieve Targets?

Diabetes Control: Is Vinegar A Promising Candidate To Help Achieve Targets?

Diabetes Control: Is Vinegar a Promising Candidate to Help Achieve Targets? 1Sick Kids Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore 2Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore 3Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore Find articles by Pryseley Nkouibert Assam 2Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore 3Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore 2Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore 4National University of Singapore, Singapore 5Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore 2Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore 3Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore 1Sick Kids Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore 3Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore 4National University of Singapore, Singapore 5Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Fahad Javaid Siddiqui, MSc, Centre for Global Child Health, Sick Kids Hospital, 686 Bay Street, 11th Floor, Suite 11.9805, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 0A4, Canada. Email: [email protected] Received 2017 Jun 30; Revised 2017 Oct 30; Accepted 2017 Nov 24. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License ( ) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages ( ). Renewed interest in vinegar as a glucose-lowering agent led to several small trials in the recent past. However, none of the trials could independently provide sufficient evidence. Our review aimed to obtain reliable estimates of effects of vinegar on short-te Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

Is there a way to reverse diabetes? Specifically, type 2 diabetes? You might be surprised to discover there are three unbelievable natural remedies that I don’t believe the medical establishment—or, more specifically, the pharmaceutical companies—want you to know about. Why would they not want you to know about this stuff? It’s because the pharmaceutical industry is a gigantic machine which has to sustain itself. The diabetic industry alone is massive, owing to the fact that over 300 million people in the world have type 2 diabetes. The treatments and medication used to treat diabetes are big business, so why would these companies be at all interested in truly reversing diabetes? How would that benefit them financially? Unfortunately, a lot of diabetes drugs don’t actually work, or work with limited success and a lot of potential side effects. Science has shown that—in terms of diabetic management—these drugs are more dangerous than anything. Drugs used in the 1950s, for the most part, have all been taken off the market because they were shown to increase the risk of heart disease. This has even happened recently with drugs like Avandia. It was the world’s most popular Type 2 diabetes drug until it was revealed to have side effects that caused serious heart problems. New drugs haven’t proven to be much better. With that in mind, I’m going to share with you 3 amazing, all-natural solutions to reverse diabetes. Even if you don’t have type 2 diabetes, these solutions can help you prevent it. Here’s something I want you to realize; please never forget this: If you have type two diabetes, it’s not a life sentence. It’s actually one of the easiest—and I don’t say that in a condescending way; I say it in an optimistic way—diseases to completel Continue reading >>

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Apple cider vinegar has long been a favorite natural remedy for an extraordinary number of ailments. It has been used to treat bacterial and fungal infections, hyperacidity, warts, fatigue, cancer, to clear acne, cure hiccups, lower blood pressure, get rid of dandruff, on sunburns and to treat leg cramps, to name just a few. Apple cider vinegar has been used for centuries and is made from fermented apple mash. It contains acetic acid, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, polyphenols and other types of acids. The “mother” fluid is a product of a long fermentation process and will often look cloudy because of the non-infectious and non-toxic bacteria (the probiotics) that it contains. Other, “non-mother” products are filtered to remove the cloudiness and may be less beneficial. Evidence is beginning to pile up for at least some uses of apple cider vinegar—commonly known as ACV. Many professionals will recommend, however, that you only use the “mother” ACV and not any filtered ACV products. Some of the Evidence-based Medical Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar Many of the uses for ACV is to fight infections, particularly skin infections—since ACV is high in acetic acid, it is very likely that ACV can kill off bacterial, fungal and viral infections because the acid in ACV is absorbed and directly kills off any infectious agent. This is likely to explain the traditional use of ACV on skin infections. [1] Using ACV on wounds may also be useful in preventing infections because of its acidity. ACV is also used to treat hyperacidity (heartburn). To use ACV for heartburn, the recommendation is to add about 1 tablespoon of ACV to 6 ounces of water and drink it about 20 minutes before a meal—this actually stimulates a normal amount of acid in the stomach.[2] ACV has been test Continue reading >>

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Given the importance of maintaining acceptable blood glucose concentrations, there is much interest in identifying foods and diet patterns that will help individuals with diabetes manage their condition. Based on previous data indicating that vinegar ingestion at mealtime reduces postprandial glycemia (1–4), the aim of this pilot study was to examine whether vinegar ingestion at bedtime reduces the next-morning fasting glucose concentration in individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Four men and seven women (aged 40–72 years) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (by a physician) who were not taking insulin completed the study. Participants provided a clinically determined A1C reading from a recent (<2 months) blood analysis. All participants gave written informed consent, and the study was approved by the institutional review board at Arizona State University. Participants maintained 24-h diet records for 3 days and measured fasting glucose at 0700 h for 3 consecutive days with a calibrated glucometer before the start of the study. Participants were instructed to continue usual prescription medication use during the study. Utilizing a randomized crossover design with a 3- to 5-day washout period between treatments, participants followed a standardized meal plan for 2 days, consuming either 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar or water at bedtime with 1 oz cheese (8 g protein, 1 g carbohydrate, and 1.5 g fat). The standardized meal plan was designed to reflect the individual's typical diet. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages ingested during each 2-day treatment period. Fasting glucose was recorded with a calibrated glucometer by each participant during the trial: at baseline (day 0) and day 2 at 0700 h. These results were download Continue reading >>

5 Simple Ways To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Treating Diabetes

5 Simple Ways To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Treating Diabetes

5 Simple Ways To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Treating Diabetes 5 Simple Ways To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Treating Diabetes Ravi Teja Tadimalla Apple cider vinegar has several uses, but one of the most important of those could be aiding diabetes treatment. But how does it do that? And wait, is ACV really effective in stalling diabetes symptoms in their tracks? Well, you need to read this article to find that out. Is Apple Cider Vinegar Good For Diabetes? Lets take a look at what the research says. One Iranian study speaks about how ACV might reduce blood sugar levels and have positive effects on blood cholesterol levels ( 1 ). Another small study found that it could improve the levels of blood sugar and insulin in the case of type 2 diabetes ( 2 ). Thats one side of the story. The other side talks about how ACV might actually worsen glycemic control, and this might aggravate diabetes symptoms a bit. A few other studies have also shown that ACV can slow down the rate at which food and fluids leave the stomach this makes it harder for any individual to control blood sugar. ACV might also interact with certain medications, and its strong taste may not be okay for all. So, thats a bag of mixed results. Whats the conclusion? Should you try it? ACV is not harmful per se. It is considered safe and can be worth a try. But ensure you use organic, unfiltered, and raw ACV because it will be higher in beneficial bacteria (and it appears cloudy too). Here are the various ways you can use ACV to aid your diabetes treatment. How To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes Mix the ACV and water. Consume the mixture, along with the cheese, before bedtime. Try it for a week, and consult your doctor post the results. Follow his/her advice. ACV contains acetic acid, which is known for its a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas which allows your body to use sugar from carbohydrates for immediate energy or to store for later - a process type 2 diabetes sufferers struggle to do. In this condition, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells don’t react to insulin. Which means blood sugar levels can get too high for too long a period. This can cause hyperglycaemia, which in turn can trigger heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. But there might be a simple solution in the form of apple cider vinegar. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. Research has found it improved type 2 diabetes patients’ insulin sensitivity - that’s insulin’s ability to bring sugar out of the bloodstream and into the body’s cells. The 2004 study also discovered it lessened the rise of blood sugar and insulin when patients were given insulin- and glucose-spiking foods, such as a bagel and orange juice. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Further research supports these findings. A Swedish study saw healthy males given bread with and without white vinegar - the former group showed a lowering of blood sugar and insulin - while in a 2008 study on rats it reduced blood sugar levels. Researchers have found that less than one ounce of apple cider vinegar is needed to significantly reduce blood sugar levels after a meal, while a study published in the journal Diabetes Care discovered two tablespoons with a cheese snack w Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

For many years, apple cider vinegar has been linked with an array of health benefits. These have ranged from aiding weight loss to relieving cold symptoms. But does taking it help people with diabetes? The majority of the health claims around apple cider vinegar have yet to be supported by clinical research. However, evidence has been emerging to suggest that apple cider vinegar may have certain benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes. This article will discuss the research behind this claim and how apple cider vinegar should be taken, if at all. What is apple cider vinegar? Vinegar can be made from nearly any carbohydrate. Apple cider vinegar is derived from cider or freshly pressed apple juice. Like most vinegars, apple cider vinegar is produced after a slow process spanning several weeks or months in which sugars are broken down. Mother of vinegar is a cobweb-like substance made from yeast and bacteria that builds up during this period. Mother of vinegar gives the vinegar a cloudy appearance and it is only present in unfiltered apple cider vinegar. It is thought to boost the vinegar's nutritional value. However, most vinegar is pasteurized. This heating process kills bacteria but prevents mother of vinegar from forming. Apple cider vinegar and diabetes In 1980, there were around 108 million people with diabetes worldwide. Its prevalence has increased greatly over the past few decades to an estimated 422 million. Diabetes is a chronic condition marked by an inability to manage blood sugar levels appropriately. The hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels is called insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce this hormone. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin or respond appropriately to the hormone. People c Continue reading >>

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