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Can Diabetics Have Truvia?

Truvia Vs Stevia: Pros And Cons

Truvia Vs Stevia: Pros And Cons

You’ve read all the labels. You’ve picked through every box on the grocery store shelves. But if you still can’t make heads or tails of all the sweeteners available today, you aren’t alone. Slick marketing tactics and unfamiliar ingredients make this process difficult for even the most informed consumer. So let’s clear up the confusion. We’ll cover two of the most popular sweeteners on the market – Truvia and Stevia – and determine which one is better for your health. Truvia and Stevia seem similar when you see them on the shelves. So, what really sets these sweeteners apart? Looking for a Little Sweetness – Without Sugar’s Harmful Effects Many of us need to drastically cut down our sugar intake. This is one of those rare health topics that practically everyone you talk to – mainstream nutritionists, vegans, Paleos, etc. – all agree on. Suffering from Diabetes or blood sugar imbalance? Grab our FREE Diabetes Guide & 7 Day Meal Plan here! Consumption of sugary sodas and processed foods drives obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and many other serious health issues (1, 2). Most people are aware of this, so they’re taking action to avoid the stuff. Sometimes that’s easier said than done because sugar has been proven to have addictive qualities (3). Many of us are still looking for a little sweetness in our morning coffee or baked treats – without all the negative health consequences. This has created an enormous opportunity for food companies to create sugar alternatives. Artificial sweeteners, like NutraSweet (aspartame) and Splenda (sucralose), have been around for a while now. But increased skepticism about artificial ingredients stoked consumer demand for healthier options. And so natural sweeteners were born. Two of the most pop Continue reading >>

Truvia Vs Splenda: Which Is Better For You?

Truvia Vs Splenda: Which Is Better For You?

Truvia and Splenda, along with other artificial sweeteners, are used in a lot of "light" and "low-fat" products because they're no-calorie sweeteners. Deciding between Truvia vs Splenda can be a tough decision. Many people use artificial sweeteners like Truvia and Splenda for many reasons. These artificial sweeteners have zero calories, so people may use them to help in weight loss. Others may use them if they have diabetes because they don't raise blood sugar thanks to their low glycemic index (GI). They claim to be healthy, but they may have adverse health effects. So, what's the difference between these two sweeteners? What are they made of? PIN IT Splenda's original products are made of sucralose. Sucralose is an artificial sweetener that was discovered in the 1970s at a British college. This sweetener can't be broken down by the body, which is why it has no calories. Scientifically speaking, researchers took sucrose (table sugar), replaced three hydrogen oxygen groups with three chlorine atoms, and made sucralose. Splenda was introduced in the late '90s, about 10 years before Truvia hit the market. But Truvia really seems to be getting a following lately because of the claim that it's "natural." However, don't be fooled because the FDA does not have a definition for using the term "natural" on food labels. Therefore, anything can be "natural." Truvia is made form the stevia leaf. The stevia leaf comes from the plant named "stevia rebaudiana," otherwise known as the "candy leaf" or "sweet leaf." Truvia also contains erythritol, which is found naturally in some food plants. What do they taste like? Huffington Post taste testers said that Splenda is very bland. Some even said that it had a paper or cardboard flavor to it. Truvia claims that their sweetener tastes grea Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

The Truth On Truvia | Cassie.net

The Truth On Truvia | Cassie.net

Thanks to a false-advertising job well-done, many health conscious consumers have been tricked into believing that Truvia is the same thing as Stevia.The (disappointing) truth is that, despite the fact that Truvia is marketed as a "stevia-based sugar substitute,"it is NOT equivalent to Stevia. Not even close, actually. Get this: the ingredient list for Truvia is as follows: Erythritol, Rebiana and Natural Flavors. Just three ingredients and Stevia isn't even one of them!That right there should tell us something (for starters, not to trust the product manufacturer...which by the way is Coca-Cola teamed up with a company called Cargill) Lets take a look at those three ingredients that make up Truvia: 1. Erythritol: A sugar alcohol which is made by processing genetically modified corn; this is the primary ingredient in Truvia. Sugar alcohols are notoriously known for their unpleasant side effects. Our bodies do a poor job at digesting sugar alcohols (which is why they are lower in calories ), but because they aren't completely digested, they hang out in our intestines where they are fermented by colonic bacteria.The by-products of fermentation include gastric distress, diarrhea, cramping, gas and bloating. Yuck. Thats ingredient #1. 2. Rebiana:Half of one percent of Truvia is Rebiana. The truth is that the only reason Truvia can mention anything about Stevia is because Rebiana is derivedfrom a Stevia plant. But again, dont be fooled. Rebiana is certainly not the same thing as Stevia. It is a molecule of the stevia plant. Furthermore, Rebiana is actually 400 times sweeter than sugar, but youll notice that Truvia is only twice as sweet as sugar. If you do the math, youll see that if a container of Truvia was divided into 200 parts, 199 of them would be Erythritol and only o Continue reading >>

Truvia Vs Splenda | Which Is Better For Your Health?

Truvia Vs Splenda | Which Is Better For Your Health?

Truvia Vs Splenda | Which Is Better For Your Health? Truvia Vs Splenda Which Is Better For Your Health? Artificial sweeteners are sprawling their popularity among health conscious people. Nowadays, sugar is becoming a source of plenty of diseases. It is the primary reason why people are diverting their attention towards artificial sweeteners like Truvia andSplenda. A silent battle is running between Truvia andSplenda. People are very much confused between these two brands; they do not know which healthier alternative to sugar is. There are many myths and superficial talks about these sweeteners, which is confusing people. Now, it is the right time to become aware of pros and cons of Truvia and Splenda. Truvia is the new sweetener from the stevia plant . Its manufacturers claim that it is all natural product. It is the reason health conscious people can use Truvia as a better alternative to sugar. With the help of this artificial sweetener, one can satisfy his taste buds with the sweet taste of this unreal sugar without affecting health. It is also claimed that Truvia has no calories. It means that diabetic people and people who are trying to lower their calorie count can unrestrictedly use Truvia in their regular meal. This sweetener will act like sugar but doesnt increase your calorie count. Truvia are marketed as all natural product. It is said that this product is a miracle of nature and not a product formed by using chemistry formulas. If this saying is correct, then Truvia is safe and secure for health. Truvia composed from stevia and stevia is a natural sweetener; you can grow stevia plant on your own patio. To extract the sweetness from this plant, you have to harvest its leaves and then dry them in sunlight. These harvested and dried leaves will be sweet. You c Continue reading >>

Truvia Vs. Splenda: Which Is Best?

Truvia Vs. Splenda: Which Is Best?

Welcome to our new Tuesday series! It's a food face-off, comparing two products to determine if one wins in nutritional value. Today, we match up two popular no-calorie sweeteners, Truvia (aka stevia) & Splenda (aka sucralose). Please send along... Welcome to our new Tuesday series! It's a food face-off, comparing two products to determine if one wins in nutritional value. Today, we match up two popular no-calorie sweeteners, Truvia (aka stevia) & Splenda (aka sucralose). Please send along any comparisons you are curious about in the comments below! With rates of obesity on the rise we are always in search of ways to cut calories. A popular way for many food producers and consumers to do so is to use artificial or alternative sweeteners instead of sugar. There are many choices on the shelf at the grocery store right now and we'll likely continue to see more in the future. The newest product on the market is Truvia, the first all natural zero-calorie sweetener. Truvia is a product of the stevia plant, which is grown in the ground, then the leaves are harvested and steeped to obtain rebiana, a concentrated form of the leaves' sweet properties. The rebiana is then combined with erythritol (a sugar alcohol) for bulk and sold as a granulated sweetener. One packet of Truvia is 2X as sweet as a teaspoon of sugar. Splenda has been on the shelves a bit longer but it's still relatively new to the sweetener market, compared to aspartame (Equal) and saccharin (Sweet N' Low). Splenda was the most "natural" sweetener we had until Truvia came along. It was considered more "natural" because it is a chemical derivative of the sugar molecule itself. Basically, they replace parts of the sugar molecule with chlorine, then add maltodextrin and dextrose - both natural carbohydrate compounds. Continue reading >>

Truvia - The Sweet Alternative - My Sweet Mission

Truvia - The Sweet Alternative - My Sweet Mission

Truvia The Sweet Alternative has the sweetness of sugar without the calories! But, did you know that Truvia has a product especially made for baking called Truvia Baking Blend ? It bakes up amazingly and with 75% fewer calories than regular sugar. I recently started using Truvia packets in my beverages and I love the taste! I even decided to carry a small bag of them in my purse. Our friend Landa, which is our son-in-law Kennys Mom, asked me for some diabetic dessert recipes. As most of you know, baking with sugar substitutes can be a little tricky and baked goods made with sugar substitutes usually dont taste as good as recipes made with regular sugar. But, after reading about Truvia Baking Blend I can hardly wait to make a sweet treat that tastes great but lower in sugar for you! Truvia Stevia Leaf Extract Erythritol Truvia is a natural zero-calorie sweetener. Its made from the best tasting part of the stevia plant. What is stevia? It is a plant native to areas of northeastern Paraguay. For more than 200 years stevia has been used to sweeten foods and beverages. Truvia natural sweetener is made from stevia leaf extract, erythritol and natural flavors. Erythritol is an all-natural, zero-calorie sweetener that has been a part of the human diet for thousands of years. It is present in foods such as pears, melons, grapes, mushrooms and fermentation-derived foods such as wine, soy sauce and cheese. It is added to foods and beverages for sweetness and to enhance taste and texture. I decided to do some research about using Truvia in baking and found that Truvia Baking Blend is formulated especially for baking. Interesting facts about Truvia Baking Blend: Provides amazing taste and texture in baked goods Continue reading >>

Baking And Cooking With Sugar Substitutes

Baking And Cooking With Sugar Substitutes

Chances are, you’ve tried one or more sugar substitutes in an effort to cut calories or control your carbohydrate intake. Maybe you use a sweetener such as sucralose (brand name Splenda) in your morning coffee, or you might reach for a can of diet soda that contains aspartame to help quench your thirst. But you might be wondering about using sugar substitutes when you cook or bake. Can you use them, and, if so, what works best? Sugar substitutes 101 Sugar substitutes, which are also called artificial sweeteners, nonnutritive sweeteners, or noncaloric sweeteners, are sweeteners that contain virtually no calories and no carbohydrate. These sweeteners are chemicals or plant-based substances that are hundreds of times sweeter than regular sugar (sucrose) and that have little or no effect on blood sugar levels. Sugar substitutes are very popular among people who have diabetes, as well as the general population. Given that a can of regular cola contains 143 calories and 40 grams of carb (all of them from sugar), it’s easy to understand why one would reach for a can of diet soda with 0 calories and 0 grams of carb. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved eight sugar substitutes. • Acesulfame-K (brand names Sunett and Sweet One) • Advantame • Aspartame (brand names Equal and Nutrasweet) • Monk fruit extract (brand names Pure Fruit, Monk Fruit in the Raw, Fruit Sweetness) • Neotame (brand name Newtame) • Saccharin (brand names Sweet’N Low and Sugar Twin) • Steviol glycosides, or rebiana (brand names PureVia, Truvia, SweetLeaf, Zing) • Sucralose (brand name Splenda) (Click here to learn more about several of these sugar substitutes.) Another class of sweeteners called sugar alcohols also are used as sugar substitutes. These sweeteners contain abo Continue reading >>

Sugars, Sugar Substitutes And Sweeteners: Natural And Artificial

Sugars, Sugar Substitutes And Sweeteners: Natural And Artificial

If you’re living with diabetes, or even if you’re not, you might think sweet foods are a barrier to your healthy, balanced diet. As a general rule,everyone should be eating less sugar– but sometimes, only something sweet will do. If want to lose weight, or you’re trying to keep your blood glucose levels stable, you may want to know whether artificial sweeteners could help. If you browse around your local supermarket, you’ll see a huge range of sweeteners on offer, so it can be baffling to know which, if any, to go for. So in this section we'll take you through: Sweeteners are ingredients that are added to food to enhance sweetness. They can be grouped in different ways: One way is to loosely group sweeteners as: sugar or sugar substitutes.Another way to group sweeteners is whether the sweetener is: natural or artificial. One of the most useful ways of grouping sweeteners is to look at those that have nutritive value, ie nutritive sweeteners, and those without nutritive value, ie non-nutritive or ‘low-calorie’ sweeteners. Nutritive sweeteners There are different types of nutritive sweeteners, but they all contain carbohydrate and provide calories. They are usually referred to as ‘sugars’ or ‘added sugar’, but they can also appear in the ingredient list of food packaging as: glucose fructose sucrose maltose honey and syrup, etc. Polyols One group of nutritive sweeteners is polyols, which are sugar alcohols, and include: erythritol isomalt maltitol mannitol sorbitol xylitol. They can be natural or artificially produced. Polyols contain carbohydrates and calories, but they have fewer calories and less of an effect on blood glucose levels than sucrose (sugar). Polyols and diabetes It’s not exactly clear how the polyols should be ‘counted’ by peopl Continue reading >>

The Best Sugar Substitutes For People With Diabetes

The Best Sugar Substitutes For People With Diabetes

With a low to no calorie sugar count, artificial sweeteners may seem like a treat for people with diabetes. But recent research suggests that artificial sweeteners may actually be counterintuitive. Especially if you’re looking to manage or prevent diabetes. In fact, the increased consumption of these sugar substitutes may correlate to the increase of obesity and diabetes cases. The good news is that there are sugar alternatives you can choose from. You’ll still want to count your intake for glucose management, but these options are far better than the marketed “sugar-free” products. Stevia Stevia is a FDA approved low-calorie sweetener that has anti-oxidant and anti-diabetic properties. Unlike artificial sweeteners and sugar, stevia can suppress your plasma glucose levels and significantly increase glucose tolerance. It’s also technically not an artificial sweetener. That’s because it’s made from the leaves of the stevia plant. Stevia also has the ability to: increase insulin effect on cell membranes increase insulin production stabilize blood sugar levels counter mechanics of type 2 diabetes and its complications You can find stevia under brand names like: PureVia Sun Crystals Sweet Leaf Truvia While stevia is natural, these brands are usually highly processed and may contain other ingredients. For example, Truvia goes through 40 processing steps before it’s ready to be sold, and contains the sugar alcohol erythritol. Future research may shed more light on the health impacts of consuming these processed stevia sweeteners. The best way to consume stevia is to grow the plant yourself and use the whole leaves to sweeten foods. What’s the difference between Truvia and stevia? » Tagatose Tagatose is another naturally occurring sugar that researchers are s Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Is it possible to eat sweets when you have diabetes? The answer is "yes." But when you’re trying to satisfy your sweet tooth, it can be hard to know what to reach for at the grocery store (sugar-free this or low-calorie that). So, use this primer to help you choose wisely. The Sweet Facts When you’re comparing sweeteners, keep these things in mind: Sugars are naturally occurring carbohydrates. These include brown sugar, cane sugar, confectioners’ sugar, fructose, honey, and molasses. They have calories and raise your blood glucose levels (the level of sugar in your blood). Reduced-calorie sweeteners are sugar alcohols. You might know these by names like isomalt, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and xylitol. You'll often find them in sugar-free candy and gum. They have about half the calories of sugars and can raise your blood sugar levels, although not as much as other carbohydrates. Artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods." They were designed in a lab, have no calories, and do not raise your blood sugar levels. Types of Artificial Sweeteners Artificial low-calorie sweeteners include: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low, Sugar Twin). You can use it in both hot and cold foods. Avoid this sweetener if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal). You can use it in both cold and warm foods. It may lose some sweetness at high temperatures. People who have a condition called phenylketonuria should avoid this sweetener. Acesulfame potassium or ace-K (Sweet One, Swiss Sweet, Sunett). You can use it in both cold and hot foods, including in baking and cooking. Sucralose (Splenda). You can use it in hot and cold foods, including in baking and cooking. Processed foods often contain it. Advantame can be used in baked goods, soft drinks and other non-alcoholic bev Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Here's what you need to know to understand the impact of sweeteners—both nutritive and non-nutritive—on your blood sugar. Walk down the supermarket aisles and you’ll find a dizzying array of sweeteners. Everything from ordinary (white) table sugar to newly-formulated sugars, sugar substitutes and more. Some claim benefits for people with diabetes that promise to have no effect on blood sugar. But with so many choices—from ordinary table sugar (aka cane, sucrose), maple sugar and agave to newer arrivals like coconut sugar, monk sugar and stevia, to nonnutritive sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, etc.)—how do you know which one is best for you and your blood sugar? It's important to know that use of the word natural is not a term regulated by the FDA, nor does it have a clear definition. These so-called “natural” sweeteners, also referred to as nutritive sweeteners, are a type of sugar (typically sucrose), which provide calories from carbohydrates. All nutritive sugars have about 14 calories per teaspoon and contain 5 grams of carbohydrates. Food companies seem to use the word “natural” as a marketing gimmick to give consumers a sense of additional health benefits. Popular nutritive sweetners include: brown sugar, honey, coconut sugar and agave syrup. But remember, sugar is sugar. Whether honey or table sugar, they all contain carbohydrates and will raise blood glucose levels. Having Sugar Knowledge is Important Contrary to popular belief, people with diabetes can consume sugar but it’s best when consumed in foods where it occurs naturally as it does in whole fruits. Understanding the type of sugar you consume and how much, is essential for successful diabetes management. People with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, don’t have the adequate insulin nee Continue reading >>

Truvía® Diabetes Safety & Nutritional Information

Truvía® Diabetes Safety & Nutritional Information

Truvía® Natural Sweetener is safe and appropriate for use by people with diabetes. Truvía® stevia leaf extract and erythritol have both been studied in short and long term clinical studies to evaluate safety for use by people with diabetes. Truvía® Natural Sweetener has little or no effect on blood glucose or insulin. Studies show that consumption of Truvía® Natural Sweetener has no effect on the glycemic index and is well tolerated by type 2 diabetics. While the product label declares grams of carbohydrate per serving, this carbohydrate is erythritol (a sugar alcohol) which is used as the carrier for the intensely sweet stevia leaf extract. Erythritol cannot be used by the body to create glucose and it cannot be converted to energy (calories). The body removes erythritol without metabolizing it. Therefore, the product label lists grams of carbohydrate for erythritol because FDA labeling regulations require it, but a person who is closely monitoring carbohydrate intake should not count these grams of carbohydrate. Truvía® Baking Blend contains 1 gram of sugar per 1⁄2 teaspoon. The amount of Truvía® Baking Blend used in your patient's recipes and the amount of sugar it provides to a serving of their recipe should be considered as they manage their blood sugar. For example, a cup of sugar has about 190 grams of usable carbohydrate. An equal amount of sweetness from Truvía® Baking Blend (1⁄2 cup) contains about 47 grams of sugar or usable carbohydrate. The other ingredients of Truvía® Baking Blend, stevia leaf extract and erythritol, do not increase blood sugar. Studies conducted with stevia leaf extract and erythritol in people with diabetes have shown that these ingredients have little or no effect on blood sugar. Truvía® Stevia Leaf Extract side ef Continue reading >>

Stevia Becomes Truvia

Stevia Becomes Truvia

Today we know the name of a previously unheard of sweetener, named Truvia. It’s pronounced Tru-VEE-a and promises to have a pronounced effect on the choice of sweeteners that many people use. It’s non-caloric and natural. It will be big because the big boys, Cargill and The Coca-Cola Company, are behind it. It’s especially big news for people who want to lose weight, like most people with diabetes. Truvia is the brand name of the extract rebiana from the stevia plant that these companies launched in a Webinar this morning. I used my new digital voice recorder to make a copy for you here. This 27-minute introduction to Truvia starts with music that is too loud, so when you start playing it, be sure to turn down the volume on your speakers or headphones. I never heard of Truvia before today. But I knew it was coming. In my new book, Losing Weight with Your Diabetes Medication: How Byetta and Other Drugs Can Help You Lose More Weight than You Ever Thought Possible (New York: Perseus Books, February 2008), I wrote about the stevia extract, called rebiana, that these companies have been developing for the past four years. “It’s hard to determine the advantages and disadvantages of the natural stevia, which is essentially untested, against the artificial Splenda, which has been tested,” I wrote in the book. “But a tested and FDA-approved form of stevia may be coming. It’s called rebiana. Coca-Cola and Cargill are working together to develop a refined formulation of stevia. Already, Coke has filed two dozen patent applications for it.” An article on the FDA’s website explains stevia’s strange status an a dietary supplement – but not a food additive. “Stevia is derived from a South American shrub,” the article says. "Though it can impart a sweet tast Continue reading >>

Low Calorie Sweeteners

Low Calorie Sweeteners

Tweet Use of sugar needn't be outlawed for people who are diabetic, but keeping sugar intake to a minimum is certainly recommended. One way to reduce your sugar intake without sacrificing taste is by replacing table sugar (sucrose) with low calorie sweeteners, which can be beneficial for people who wish to enjoy certain foods without risking a spike in blood glucose levels as well as those who are overweight and wish to reduce their calorie intake. The charity, Diabetes UK, takes the approach that low-calorie artificial sweeteners can be included as part of the diabetic diet, as long as the food they are eaten with does not itself contain high fat or calorie content. Remember, a diabetic diet need not be 100% sugar free. Balance is the key. What is a low-calorie sweetener? Low-calorie sweeteners are sugar substitutes that have zero calories and do not raise blood glucose levels through eating them, which makes them a preferable choice for diabetic people over sugar. Low-cal sweeteners are neither carbohydrate, nor fat, and they don't fit any of the other categories of the diabetic exchange. Sweeteners can be added to a diabetic meal plan instead of exchanged. Explore low calorie sweeteners: The sweeteners listed above can be found in a number of food and drink products, whilst some are also the main ingredient of the UK's top 3 artificial sweetener brands: Canderel - which contains aspartame Splenda - which contains sucralose Sweetex - which contains saccharin One of the newest sweeteners on the market is 000 Stevia Sugar, which is a zero calorie, 100% natural sweetener that contains both Stevia and the sugar alcohol Erythritol. Types of low-calorie sweetener There are several varieties of low-calorie sweetener approved by the Food Standards Agency (FSA), the government Continue reading >>

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