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Can Diabetics Have Milk?

Dairy And Diabetes

Dairy And Diabetes

All of us, whether we have diabetes or not, need some dairy products (or non-dairy alternatives like soya products) such as milk, cheese and yogurt every day. These all contain proteins and vitamins and are an important source of calcium, which help to keep your bones and teeth strong. Some dairy foods, however, can be high in fat and saturated fat, so choose lower-fat alternatives where you can. Adults and older children who consume too much fat may find they gain weight and too much saturated fat can cause your cholesterol levels to rise, which increases your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, diabetes increases your risk of having CVD, so it pays to opt for the lower-fat options to help manage your risk. How much per day? Aim for 3 portions. What's a portion? One portion equals: 190ml (⅓ pint ) milk a small pot of yogurt 2 tbsp cottage cheese a matchbox-sized portion of cheese (30g) How to make healthy dairy choices Milk Switching to lower-fat milk, such as semi-skimmed milk (green top) from whole milk (blue top), which contains the most fat, is a good start. To make even more of a difference, try 1 per cent fat milk (orange top) or even better skimmed milk (red top). Lower-fat milks have all the goodness of whole milk, including calcium, all you lose is the fat. This table shows the savings you could make. The figures are for 100ml but bear in mind a pint is 568ml, which many of us consume each day on cereal and in cups of tea and coffee. It shows how the savings can really add up. Milk Kcal /100ml Fat /100ml Saturated fat /100ml Carbohydrate /100ml Of which sugars /100ml Salt /100ml Whole 64 3.6 2.3 4.7 4.7 0.1 Semi-skimmed 50 1.8 1.1 4.8 4.8 0.1 1% fat 43 1 0.7 4.9 4.9 0.1 Skimmed 35 0.1 < 0.1 5 5 0.1 To help you see if your favourite milk or c Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Milk nutrition facts for people with diabetes Many milk options can be found at the grocery store. These include varying percentages of cow's milk to rice milk to almond milk. Consider the nutrition facts for some of the following milk options (all serving sizes are for one cup, or 8 ounces, of milk): Calories: 149 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 276 milligrams Calories: 91 Fat: 0.61 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 316 milligrams Calories: 39 Fat: 2.88 grams Carbohydrate: 1.52 grams Protein: 1.55 grams Calcium: 516 milligrams Calories: 113 Fat: 2.33 grams Carbohydrate: 22 grams Protein: 0.67 grams Calcium: 283 milligrams While these aren't the only milk options for those with diabetes, they show how there are many different types of milk. Each milk type has its own qualities, from more to less calcium and more to fewer carbohydrates. For example, almond milk has nearly zero carbohydrates while both whole and skim milk have 12 grams of carbohydrates. Some varieties of almond milk also have more calcium per cup than dairy milk does. So Continue reading >>

Is Milk Good For Diabetics?

Is Milk Good For Diabetics?

You should avoid milk and milk products if you are diabetic. Person with diabetes have weak intestinal walls because of which the milk protein(known as caesin having 17 links) doesnt break down. These chain links being a external agents, brain develops an antibodies to kill the protein containing 17 chain links. Interestingly, Beta cells (insulin making factory) also has code 17. In process of killing protein with 17 chain links they also start killing beta cells. Hence, more you drink milk more the beta cells are being killed. So, it is advisable not to consume any milk or milk products. Originally Answered: Is milk good for diabetic patients? Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Continue reading >>

Dairy, Diabetes, And Your Heart

Dairy, Diabetes, And Your Heart

My wife’s grandfather passed away two weeks ago. At 94, he'd lived an amazing life. He grew up in a family that owned large areas of land near Farmington, New Mexico, and Durango, Colorado. He served as a pilot in World War II, married a wonderful woman, and had seven children. His wife died in her late fifties of ovarian cancer, and he lived another 40 years alone as a widower. He worked hard his entire life and continued to farm and ranch into his nineties. His legacy is left through his family, and through the many people he touched with small acts of kindness. He was a loving man of few words, but when we spoke, the words he chose were always uplifting. He lived his long, active life on a diet rich in meat and dairy products, which we’re often advised to avoid for heart health. The first few years I knew him, I think my wife’s grandfather had whole milk and a steak for at least two of his daily meals. You'd think that such a diet could be harmful, but he remained independent in his home, still working, until a stroke suddenly took his life. When I see patients in the clinic, one of the first things they mention when we discuss diet is that they intend to cut out all dairy products. Because nutritional guidelines often recommend a low-fat diet, most people believe this means they should consume less dairy fat. But is this a good idea? Are milk, cheese, butter, and other dairy products really harmful to your health, and should you avoid them? Personal experience and new clinical research sheds light on this question. The Facts on Dairy Products and Your Health First, whole-fat or low-fat dairy products have not been associated with an increase in heart disease risk factors when they’re consumed in moderation, shows a study review published in October 2013 in P Continue reading >>

Drinking Milk At Breakfast Might Help Manage Diabetes, Study Finds

Drinking Milk At Breakfast Might Help Manage Diabetes, Study Finds

Drinking milk at breakfast might help manage diabetes, study finds It could also leave you feeling fuller for longer Drinking milk in the morning may reduce blood glucose levels throughout the day, which could benefit those with type 2diabetes, new research has found. According to a study published in the Journal of Dairy Science , consuming a high-protein milk-based drink at breakfast may also cut the risk of obesity by reducing appetite at lunchtime. Lead author Dr Douglas Goff, of the University of Guelphin Canada, said that the findings could be key in addressing the global rise in metabolic diseases through diet. The 5:2 diet could increase risk of diabetes, say scientists In the study, Goff and his team of researchers examined the effects of drinking high-proteinmilk at breakfast alongsidea high-carbohydrate cereal. They looked at how this affected participants' blood glucose levels, their feelings of fullness and the amount of food theyconsumed later on in the day. They found that thanks to the whey and casein proteins naturally found in milk, drinking it first-thing releasedgastric hormones that slowed digestion and increased feelings of fullness, which could reduce the risk of obesity due to a subsequent decrease in appetite later on in the day. This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and lower blood sugar levels, said Goff. Nutritionists have always stressed the importance of a healthy breakfast, and this study should encourage consumers to include milk." The Great British Tea Off: just how much is a 'splash' of milk? Previous research has also hailed the benefits of consuming a diet high in the protein found in dairy products. For example, a study conducted by scientists at Tel Aviv University in Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

A cold glass of milk invigorates your taste buds and gives you a boost of calcium, but people with diabetes need to be selective with their milk choices. Milk provides important nutrients for bone health, but some varieties contain large amounts of saturated fat and sugar, which should be limited in a diabetic diet. Video of the Day Milk on a Diabetic Diet According to ''Diabetes Forecast,'' a publication from the American Diabetes Association, diabetes increases your chance of developing bone fractures, a risk that increases as you age and lose bone mass. Calcium-rich foods, such as milk, help keep your bones strong and protect against osteoporosis, a serious bone loss that can lead to broken bones and decreased mobility. Since milk contains lactose, a type of sugar, it needs to be counted toward your daily carbohydrate totals. The American Diabetes Association’s nutrition plan recommends 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, which includes one serving of dairy. Eight ounces of milk count as one dairy serving. Skim and Low-fat Milk Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, but you can control your risk by limiting your intake of saturated fat. One cup of whole milk provides 149 calories and 5 grams of saturated fat, but 1 cup of skim milk contains only 83 calories and 0.1 gram of saturated fat. If you prefer milk with a thicker texture than skim milk, try 1 percent milk, which has 102 calories and 1.5 grams of saturated fat per cup. All plain milk varieties provide about 12 grams of sugar per cup, but chocolate, strawberry and vanilla milk contain added sugar, so read the food label before purchasing. Benefits of Soy Milk If you do not like regular milk or are lactose intolerant, soy milk makes a healthy alternative. One cup of regular soy milk provides 131 Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

Many people have childhood memories of parents urging them to drink lots of milk. When you’re a child, you typically have to drink whatever milk your parents provided for you. It may have been a more traditional option such as whole milk or a sweet alternative such as almond milk. Now that you’re the one doing the choosing, you can pick the best type of milk for you. If you have diabetes, you should know that not all types of milk are beneficial for you. Although you need the nutritious calcium and protein found in milk, it’s important to note the saturated fats, carbohydrates, and sugar levels in each. This information will help you pick the best milk for your dietary needs. People with diabetes are not able to make, or use, insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. When insulin isn’t doing its job efficiently, blood sugar levels can spike. There are two kinds of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. No matter which type you have, managing your sugar intake is important. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, which is why carb counting is often recommended for people with diabetes. People with diabetes may also have high cholesterol or triglycerides in their blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat, which can increase the risk for a heart attack. Keeping an eye on the saturated and trans fat content in your diet is important. Diabetes can also make some people more susceptible to bone fractures. A diet high in calcium can help keep bones strong. One way to do this is by drinking milk daily. Adding calcium-rich milk into your diet may take a bit of planning. Creating a meal plan specifically designed for people with diabetes can be a good place to start. The American Diabetes Association recommends several meal plans geared toward keeping blood s Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Dairy Products?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Dairy Products?

Not particularly but the fat in whole milk may contribute to obesity which will complicate diabetes. If you must drink milk, drink skim or 1%. By the way, whole (cow's) milk contains 4% fat so 2% is not that much better -- it's not 2% of 4%. Low-fat cheeses and plain yogurt (with or without real fruit) is ok in moderation. Yes. In fact, you can pretty much eat any food if you have diabetes. But you need to know how much of that food you can eat and how often you can eat it. Dairy foods, such as milk and yogurt, contain carbohydrate, along with protein and maybe some fat. Carbohydrate has the most effect on blood glucose, compared to protein and fat. One cup of milk and six ounces of light-style yogurt each contain about 15 grams of carb, about as much as in a slice of bread or a piece of fruit. So if you want to drink milk or eat yogurt, you need to "count" them in your meal plan as one of your carb choices. Other dairy foods, like cheese, eggs and butter are mostly protein and/or fat, so they're counted differently in your meal plan. Cheese and butter tend to be high in saturated fat, a type of fat that can raise cholesterol levels, so it's wise to limit your intake of these foods, and choose lower fat cheeses and trans-fat free tub margarine, instead. Of course, if you have a lactose intolerance or a milk allergy, you may need to avoid some dairy foods. A dietitian can help you figure out how much of any food you can eat, as well as give you guidance on how much carbohydrate, protein and fat to aim for at your meals. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Milk

Can Diabetics Drink Milk

When it comes to certain foods, there are always questions as to whether or not a diabetic can have them without causing significant fluctuations in glucose levels. One such food item is milk. So the question remains: is it safe for diabetics? Actually, milk is fine for diabetics, as long as they use the moderation rule. However, they do need to consider how it can affect their blood sugar. It is best if the milk is low fat so that it causes that much less of a surge in sugar. Whole milk is not a good idea, though, due to the high levels of both glucose and lactose. For those who enjoy milk but may have an apprehension to drinking it there are other alternatives. You can try soy or rice milk. These offer virtually the same flavor as cow's milk but with some added nutritional features. These milks are also low in fat, which is one of the features of cow's milk that is not favorable. Plus, alternative milk options takes care of the problem that some have with lactose. Diabetics also have to be leery of other products that contain milk. For instance, cheese, yogurt, sour cream, ice cream, and certain creams and sauces used in cooking. It is not only necessary to watch out for these as it relates to milk, but also fat and calorie content, as well. In the end, milk is safe for diabetics as long as it is consumed in small quantities and using low fat or fat free, as long as fat and calorie content is heeded. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up. Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes due to the fact that, unlike type 1, insulin injections are not always required for treatm Continue reading >>

Dairy And Type 2 Diabetes: Why You Need It And The Best Sources | Everyday Health

Dairy And Type 2 Diabetes: Why You Need It And The Best Sources | Everyday Health

For weight management, people with type 2 diabetes are best off opting for low- or nonfat dairy. One thing that may not be front-and-center on your radar if you have type 2 diabetes: your skeleton. But it should be. Thats because having type 2 diabetes may put you at an increased risk of suffering falls and fractures. Boosting your bones is critical at this time. A review published in June 2012 in the journal Patient Preference and Adherence analyzed 47 studies on the association between type 2 and the bone disease osteoporosis . What the study authors found may surprise you: Most of the research they looked at (26 studies) found that people with type 2 had an increased bone density. Why? The National Institutes of Health points out that excess body weight has been known to be protective to bones. (About 90 percent of those with type 2 are overweight or obese.) RELATED: Too Low, Too High, or Just Right? How Your BMI Can Affect Your Health and Wellness But theres another piece of the puzzle, and thats that people with type 2 are at risk of bone fractures because theyre more prone to falling. As the NIH points out, nerve damage and vision problems may be the culprit behind the tumbles. Bones may be more apt to break, too. A study published in September 2017 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that older adults with type 2 also have changes in bone structure that boosts fracture risk. And thats where dairy comes in. Its an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D , two nutrients that work together to build bones vitamin D boosts your bodys ability to absorb calcium. Youll also get other nutrients like magnesium, phosphorus (two more bone-builders), potassium , and vitamin B12 , says Rahaf Al Bochi, RDN, CDE, at Olive Tree Nutrition in Atlanta, Georgia, and Continue reading >>

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