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Can Diabetics Have Coffee

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Drink Coffee?

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Drink Coffee?

The American Diabetes Association identifies coffee as an acceptable beverage for people with diabetes. However, coffee's impact on blood sugars can vary. According to a review published in the February 2014 issue of "Diabetes Care," the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) decreases with coffee consumption. However coffee and the additives in coffee drinks can influence blood sugar control in those who already have diabetes. Testing blood sugars may be the best way to learn the body's response to these beverages. Video of the Day A small study published in the May 2011 issue of "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" reviewed the blood glucose effects of coffee when consumed with a meal, and found that caffeinated coffee caused more insulin resistance and higher post-meal blood sugars compared to decaffeinated coffee. An individual with insulin resistance will require more insulin to lower blood sugar compared to someone whose body uses insulin efficiently. Duke University research published in the February 2008 issue of "Diabetes Care" studied habitual coffee drinkers who had T2DM, testing their glucose levels after ingestion of caffeine supplements equivalent to four cups of coffee. Compared to a placebo, the caffeine supplements caused higher post-meal blood sugars. While the mechanism was unclear, the researchers suggested caffeine may worsen insulin resistance or affect glucose by increasing the production of stress hormones. Decaffeinated coffee may also have an impact on blood sugar levels. Researchers who studied these effects on a small group of healthy young men published their findings in the February 2010 issue of "Diabetes Care." Within 60 minutes of consumption, decaffeinated coffee raised blood glucose more than a placebo, but less than caffeinated Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Good For Diabetes?

Is Coffee Good For Diabetes?

Should people with diabetes drink coffee? If you do, should it be decaf or regular? The health effects of coffee have been well studied, but we still have no definite answer. I have to admit — I don’t drink coffee and never have. The closest I get is coffee ice cream. But some of this data has me thinking I should start. • Coffee reduces risk of death. In a study of over 700,000 people done by the University of Southern California, people who drank coffee were 18% less likely to die in the next 10–16 years. The study group included people of various races and ethnic groups. • Coffee is linked with lower risk of stroke. Since stroke is a major complication of diabetes, lowering your risk seems like a good idea. • Studies indicate that coffee lowers risk ofliver and mouth cancer, improves memory, and protects against Type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. • A recent study from India found that coffee drinkers have lower fasting blood sugars. Other studies have found that coffee improves insulin function. It may lower insulin resistance. • Some nutritionists say coffee is a major source of antioxidants, molecules that slow aging and tissue breakdown. Downside of coffee Coffee has some undesirable side effects. The Mayo Clinic states that consuming more than 500–600 milligrams of caffeine a day may lead to “insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, irritability, an upset stomach, a fast heartbeat, and even muscle tremors.” It’s worth noting that 500–600 milligrams a day is a lot (about six cups of coffee or nine ounces of espresso), but some research has linked even moderate amounts of caffeine to bad health effects, according to Medical News Today. Coffee drinking in pregnancy may increase the risk of low-birth-weight babies. Drinking coffee with a Continue reading >>

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

type 2 diabetes -- but it isn't caffeine. Caffeine makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar, new studies suggest. In the latest of these studies, Duke University researcher James D. Lane, PhD, and colleagues put continuous blood-sugar monitors on 10 people with type 2 diabetes. All were regular coffee drinkers averaging four cups a day, but they stopped drinking coffee during the experiment. On one day, each patient took a 250 mg caffeine capsule at breakfast and another 250 mg caffeine capsule at lunch. That's roughly the same as having them drink two cups of coffee at each meal. On another day, the same people got placebo pills with no caffeine in them. The result: On the days the patients took caffeine, their blood-sugar levels were 8% higher. And after every meal -- including dinner -- their blood sugar spiked higher than it did on the day they had no caffeine. "These are clinically significant blood-sugar elevations due to caffeine," Lane tells WebMD. "Caffeine increases blood glucose by as much as oral diabetes medications decrease it. ... It seems the detrimental effects of caffeine are as bad as the beneficial effects of oral diabetes drugs are good." Lane warns against reading too much into this small, 10-patient study. But he says it does show that caffeine has real effects on the everyday lives of people with diabetes. "For people with diabetes, drinking coffee or consuming caffeine in other beverages may make it harder for them to control their glucose," he says. (If you have diabetes, how much caffeine do you consume on a regular basis? Talk with others on WebMD's Type 2 Diabetes Support Group message board.) Several studies have found that coffee drinkers -- especially those who drink a lot of coffee -- have a lower risk of diabe Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine And Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee, Caffeine And Type 2 Diabetes

There has been extensive research into whether consuming coffee (caffeine) is safe for those with type 2 diabetes as well as whether or not coffee could help prevent diabetes. With the ever rising population of people suffering with type 2 diabetes, it’s good to hear that the diabetic or potential diabetic has a friend in coffee. A healthy diet, low in sugar and refined carbs, is still the number one dietary measure to treat or reduce the risk for diabetes. Most research shows that coffee can be part of a diet that’s designed to prevent, treat, and/or possibly reverse type 2 diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes and Coffee Research Studies A study published by the American Diabetes Association showed that those who drink coffee have lower sugar and insulin levels. It also appears that regular coffee is better than decaffeinated, so coffee could even prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.15 overweight but otherwise healthy men were given either decaf coffee, a placebo, or the chemicals chlorogenic acid and trigonelline dissolved in water, which are two of the main antioxidants in coffee. The participants’ glucose and insulin levels were checked after consumption of each throughout the trial period. The only sample that showed lowered sugar and insulin levels was the chlorogenic acid and trigonelline solution group. Src. Another study analyzed much the latest research concerning diabetes and coffee consumption and was conducted by Harvard’s Dr. Frank Hu. His team found that the risk of type II diabetes decreased by 9% for each daily cup of coffee consumed. Decaf coffee decreased risk by 6% per cup. Src. An 11 year study looked at the diabetes and coffee risk association in postmenopausal women. They found that women who consumed 6 cups of coffee had a 22% lower risk of develop Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

With diabetes, diet is of the utmost concern. What people with diabetes eat and drink directly affects their blood glucose levels. We often concentrate on food, but what people drink is just as important. For many people, the only way to get the day started is with a cup of coffee. Thankfully, recent studies have shown that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of getting diabetes. But what about for those who already have diabetes? Is coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, a problem for those with diabetes? Two 8-ounce cups of coffee contain about 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young healthy adults, caffeine does not seem to make blood sugar levels higher. Even consuming up to 400 milligrams per day appears to be safe for most people. This article will take a closer look at caffeine and some of the research that has been done in this area. Diabetes and caffeine According to the American Diabetes Association in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3 percent of the population had diabetes. About 8.1 million of the 29.1 million were undiagnosed. The World Health Organization reported that the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2014 was 422 million. Diabetes affects how the body uses sugar (glucose). The body needs glucose because it is an important energy source for certain cells and is the brain's main source of fuel. Glucose in the body comes from food and drink as well as being made by the liver. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone in the body and helps the body to absorb glucose. People who have diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, which can cause serious health problems. Diabetes can occur due to either the pancreas not producing no or not enough insulin or the body being unable to use insulin effectively. Type 2 is the most common type Continue reading >>

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

New research has shown—yet again—that drinking coffee can reduce your type 2 diabetes risk. The study, in nearly 1,500 Greek adults followed for a decade, found that people who downed the equivalent of 2.5 to 3 cups of brewed coffee daily had half the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. And people who drank about 1.5 cups of joe a day cut their risk by about 30%. “Apparently healthy individuals with no history of cardiovascular disease may benefit from daily consumption of this amount of coffee,” one of the study’s authors, Efi Koloverou, MmedSci, a clinical dietitian and doctoral candidate at Harokopio University in Athens, told DiabeticLifestyle in an e-mail interview. The findings were published July 1, 2015 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. There were too few decaf drinkers in the new study to draw conclusions about whether caffeine-free brew would have the same benefits. But there’s strong evidence from other research that decaf has similar protective effects, according to Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, the Flatt Professor in Foods and Nutrition at the University of Georgia in Athens and a national spokesperson for the American Society for Nutrition. Researchers suspect that a substance in the coffee bean itself is what helps to lower inflammation in the body. This in turn can reduce overall risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Johnson points to a 2014 meta-analysis (a study in which the results of several smaller studies are pooled and analyzed together) which included 28 studies and 1.1 million people and found both coffee and decaf coffee drinkers had a reduced likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. And the more a person drank, the lower their risk. Java drinkers got more good news earlier this year, when the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Continue reading >>

Decaffeinated Coffee And Glucose Metabolism In Young Men

Decaffeinated Coffee And Glucose Metabolism In Young Men

OBJECTIVE The epidemiological association between coffee drinking and decreased risk of type 2 diabetes is strong. However, caffeinated coffee acutely impairs glucose metabolism. We assessed acute effects of decaffeinated coffee on glucose and insulin levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of the effects of decaffeinated coffee, caffeinated coffee, and caffeine on glucose, insulin, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) levels during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 11 young men. RESULTS Within the first hour of the OGTT, glucose and insulin were higher for decaffeinated coffee than for placebo (P < 0.05). During the whole OGTT, decaffeinated coffee yielded higher insulin than placebo and lower glucose and a higher insulin sensitivity index than caffeine. Changes in GIP could not explain any beverage effects on glucose and insulin. CONCLUSIONS Some types of decaffeinated coffee may acutely impair glucose metabolism but less than caffeine. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eleven healthy male nonsmokers signed an informed consent and participated. The following participation requirements were started 1 week prior to the first lab visit: keep diet, exercise, and alcohol intake stable; no caffeinated drinks, foods, or medications; no smoking; and no alcohol or exercise during the 48 h prior to each visit. There were four visits separated by at least a week. Participants ingested one of four beverages assigned by researchers in a single-blinded randomized fashion at a temperature of 43–49°C (caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, caffeine in warm water, or warm water [placebo]). An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was initiated 1 h later (t = 0 min) with ingestion of 75 g of glucose in wat Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

A prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women Abstract OBJECTIVE—High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses’ Health Study II aged 26–46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001. RESULTS—After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73–1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49–0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41–0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83–0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73–0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82–0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74–0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64–1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes. High coffee consumption has been associated with better glucose tolerance and a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in diverse populations in Europe, the U.S., and Japan (1–3). However, it remains unclear what co Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Part 1 of 8 Highlights For people without diabetes, coffee may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Caffeine has been shown in the short term to increase both glucose and insulin levels. Because of this, people with diabetes should be cautious when consuming coffee. Once sweetener is added to coffee, it removes the benefits of diabetes prevention. It can actually increase your risk of developing diabetes. Coffee was once condemned as being bad for your health. However, there’s growing evidence that it may protect against certain kinds of cancers, liver disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. There’s also compelling research that increasing your coffee intake may actually lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This is good news for those of us who can’t face the day until we get in our cup of java. However, for those who already have type 2 diabetes, coffee could have adverse effects. Whether you’re trying to lower your risk, you have diabetes, or you just can’t go without your cup of joe, learn about coffee’s effects on diabetes. Part 2 of 8 According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease (or group of diseases) that affects how your body processes blood glucose (sugar). Blood glucose is important because it is what fuels your brain and gives energy to your muscles and tissues. If you have diabetes, that means that you have too much blood glucose circulating in your body and it can cause serious health concerns. There are a number of different factors that can cause diabetes. Chronic diabetes types are type 1 and type 2. Other types include gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but tends to go away after birth. Another is prediabetes, which means your blood glucose levels are higher than usual but not as high as woul Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Navigating what you can and cannot eat and drink when you have type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Of course, there’s the obvious stuff you know is good to cut out or limit in your diet, like processed sweets and other refined carbohydrates, which can cause blood sugar levels to soar when eaten in excess. But what about those murkier diet staples, which seem to straddle the line between healthy and indulgent, but are ingrained in so many of our everyday rituals? For millions of people in various cultures around the world, caffeinated drinks are likely the sort of thing that comes to mind when we talk about food or drinks in a healthy diabetes diet that aren’t so cut-and-dried. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while and are seeking better blood sugar control, the subject of caffeine in a diabetes diet is a fair concern. Caffeinated Drinks for Diabetes: Are They Safe? “For people already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, studies have shown caffeine consumption decreases insulin sensitivity and raises blood sugar levels,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, who is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina. According to a review published in April 2017 in Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, five out of seven trials studied found that caffeine increases blood glucose and keeps levels higher longer. That doesn’t sound good, but if you’re accustomed to having your morning java, don’t skip out on the drink just yet. Some studies suggest that other components of caffeinated coffee may offer some benefits for people with diabetes. In a study published in March 2016 in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers looked at coffee consumption in adults with and w Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

Caffeine Impairs Glucose Metabolism In Type 2 Diabetes

Caffeine Impairs Glucose Metabolism In Type 2 Diabetes

Caffeine is a widely used drug despite evidence that it has deleterious consequences for health, including diabetes (1). In 1967, a study reported that drinking two cups of instant coffee significantly impaired glucose tolerance in a small group of men with “maturity-onset diabetes” (2). Recent studies showed that caffeine acutely decreased insulin sensitivity in young, nondiabetic adults (3–5). This study tested how oral caffeine affects carbohydrate metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes, for whom decreases in insulin sensitivity might result in exaggerated hyperglycemic responses to glucose and other carbohydrates, which would aggravate the glycemic dysregulation found in the disease. We tested the effects of caffeine on fasting glucose and insulin levels and on glucose and insulin responses to a mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The research protocol, approved by the medical center’s Institutional Review Board, employed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. The study group comprised of 14 habitual coffee drinkers (11 men and 3 women, age 61 ± 9 years [means ± SD]), who had at least a 6-month history of type 2 diabetes. Based on self-reports, daily caffeine intake from all beverages averaged 526 ± 144 mg/day. Mean fasting plasma glucose was 7.5 ± 1.6 mmol/l. Three of the subjects managed diabetes with diet and exercise, and the remainder also used oral agents. None required exogenous insulin therapy. They were free of major medical disorders, were nonsmokers, and used no psychotropic medications known to affect glucose metabolism. The subjects completed informed consent before testing. Caffeine and placebo treatments. Caffeine and placebo treatments were administered in identical gelatin capsules containin Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

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