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Can Diabetics Fast And Pray?

Christian Fasting

Christian Fasting

More and more followers of Christ are discovering the power and benefits of Christian fasting. In fact, Christian fasting is growing at such a fast rate that this site alone has had more 1.5 millioin hits since I started it in December 2007. I hope you take some time to look around this blog and the site. It’s packed with lots of information about Christian Fasting and also about The Daniel Fast. There are several types of Christian fasting. Many people think of totally abstaining from food, which is indeed a type of fast. However, the type of fast that is growing in popularity is a partial fast based on the fasting experiences of the Prophet Daniel. It’s called the Daniel Fast and serves as a type of fast that one can employ during any time of the year and for whatever length of time one feels led. With that in mind, the benefits of the Daniel Fast are best gained over at least 10 days. Most often the fast is practiced for 21 days, yet this is not a requirement. The Daniel Fast is a partial fast in that some foods are restricted, but not all. I often explain it to people as a vegan diet with more restrictions. All foods are plant-based and the only beverage is water (see Daniel 1). Additionally, there are no sweeteners, deep fried foods, stimulants (including caffeine), processed foods or man-made chemical on the fast. When you begin Christian fasting, think of it similar to going on a vacation. You plan your vacation and it has a purpose, you prepare for your vacation before you start it, when you are on your vacation, you behave differently, and when you return from your vacation you reflect on the experience. Christian fasting is similar in that you will plan, prepare, act differently , and then reflect on your fast when it is complete. The purpose of fasting is Continue reading >>

Tips For Diabetics Who Plan To Fast During Ramadan

Tips For Diabetics Who Plan To Fast During Ramadan

Dr Farhana bin Lootah offers crucial advice to those who are fasting during the holy month from an internal medicine specialist at Imperial College London Diabetes Centre. Can I fast during Ramadan if I have diabetes? For most people, fasting is not harmful. However, a problem can occur if you are living with diabetes, such as the risk of high glucose levels following the larger meals that we eat before and after fasting at suhoor and iftar. Of course, this year the fasting period is long – 15 hours in the UAE – meaning that the risks of hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar levels) and dehydration (lack of water) are high. It is also important to not break the fast with a very large, excessive meal as there is a potential risk of post-meal hyperglycaemia. Distribute energy intake from food over two to three smaller meals during the non-fasting interval. This may help you avoid this spike in blood sugar. It is very important that anyone living with type 1 diabetes understands that they are at a higher risk compared to those with type 2 diabetes when fasting during the holy month. It is recommended that anyone living with diabetes consults with their doctor before fasting. It is crucial that if you are a type 1 diabetes patient and intend to fast, that you are closely supervised. And ensure that your blood sugar is regularly monitored to mitigate health risks, where together you will look to adjust insulin doses according to food intake and activity. If you are living with type 2 diabetes, generally it is safe to fast during Ramadan, provided that you talk to your doctor about your plans and prepare yourself well. But it is not safe for everyone living with type 2, especially those who have poorly controlled diabetes. Your ability to fast safely is often influenced by you Continue reading >>

Muslim Religious Observances And Diabetes

Muslim Religious Observances And Diabetes

Author(s): Glen Felias-Christensen, BS, RN; Dawn Corl, RN, MN, CDE Reviewer(s): Anab Abdullahi; Dawn Corl, RN, MN, CDE; Bria Chakofsky-Lewy, RN; J. Carey Jackson, MD, MPH, MA; Genji Terasaki, MD; Brent E. Wisse, MD Methods The authors gathered information from the following sources: literature review; materials related to the topic that are available on EthnoMed; interviews with religious leaders, Harborview Medical Center physicians, Harborview Medical Center’s (Seattle) Multicultural Diabetes Team; and Harborview Medical Center caseworkers / cultural mediators. Introduction Islam is the religion of more than a billion Muslims throughout the world, comprising 18-25% of the world population. The Islamic faith necessitates strict observance of the injunctions of its holy book, the Koran, and the sayings and actions of the Prophet Muhammad. Muslims must fulfill a number of religious obligations, the essence of which is known as the five pillars of Islam: Stating one’s faith Praying five times a day Giving to the poor Fasting during Ramadan Making the pilgrimage to Mecca, the holy city of Islam in Saudi Arabia. As one of the five pillars of Islam, Ramadan is believed to be the most blessed and spiritually beneficial month of the Islamic year. The classic Islamic point of view is that Ramadan fasting is good for the health and spiritual cleanliness of Muslims. Ramadan gives those fasting an opportunity to practice self-control and to obtain the rewards of God. For these reasons, many Muslims who are religiously exempted from fasting on the basis of being sick still insist on doing so, even against medical advice. These individuals will observe Ramadan fasting as long as they can, determined to participate fully with others in the excitement and spirituality of the month Continue reading >>

Fasting Cures Type 2 Diabetes – T2d 4

Fasting Cures Type 2 Diabetes – T2d 4

While many consider Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) irreversible, fasting has also been long known to cure diabetes. In our previous post, we considered bariatric surgery. While extreme, these surgeries have proven the point that the metabolic abnormalities that underlie T2D (hyper insulinemia, insulin resistance) can often be fully reversed after a short (weeks) period of intensive treatment with bariatrics. Many early studies were done with the heavy-duty Roux-en-Y surgery, which is the heavyweight champions of surgeries. The best weight loss. The most complications. This is the surgery that has ‘Go Big or Go Home’ tattooed on its massive bicep. But even milder forms of bariatric surgery show the same reversibility of T2D. A gastric band is essentially a belt implanted around your stomach. They keep tightening the belt so that you can’t eat. If you try to eat too much, you’ll puke it all back up. Loverly. It ain’t pretty, but it sure do work. Again, long term results are kind of iffy, but short term results are pretty good. You can see the results of gastric banding versus medical treatment from the graph above. Patients randomized to the gastric band showed a significant and pretty damn good drop in their fasting blood sugars. In other words, T2D was reversing in a b-i-g way. Those given medicines alone didn’t do very well at all. Basically they stayed the same. They were no better than before. So, yes, even gastric banding these 500 pound patients with 20 years of diabesity can reverse within weeks even before the weight comes off. One of the main questions is why? There are many hypotheses – which we will consider in a later post, but it is the sudden severe restriction of all calories that causes this beneficial effect. This is the same thing as the time teste Continue reading >>

Christian Fasting - What Does The Bible Say?

Christian Fasting - What Does The Bible Say?

Question: "Christian fasting - what does the Bible say?" Answer: Scripture does not command Christians to fast. God does not require or demand it of Christians. At the same time, the Bible presents fasting as something that is good, profitable, and beneficial. The book of Acts records believers fasting before they made important decisions (Acts 13:2; 14:23). Fasting and prayer are often linked together (Luke 2:37; 5:33). Too often, the focus of fasting is on the lack of food. Instead, the purpose of fasting should be to take your eyes off the things of this world to focus completely on God. Fasting is a way to demonstrate to God, and to ourselves, that we are serious about our relationship with Him. Fasting helps us gain a new perspective and a renewed reliance upon God. Although fasting in Scripture is almost always a fasting from food, there are other ways to fast. Anything given up temporarily in order to focus all our attention on God can be considered a fast (1 Corinthians 7:1-5). Fasting should be limited to a set time, especially when fasting from food. Extended periods of time without eating can be harmful to the body. Fasting is not intended to punish the flesh, but to redirect attention to God. Fasting should not be considered a “dieting method” either. The purpose of a biblical fast is not to lose weight, but rather to gain deeper fellowship with God. Anyone can fast, but some may not be able to fast from food (diabetics, for example). Everyone can temporarily give up something in order to draw closer to God. By taking our eyes off the things of this world, we can more successfully turn our attention to Christ. Fasting is not a way to get God to do what we want. Fasting changes us, not God. Fasting is not a way to appear more spiritual than others. Fastin Continue reading >>

Recommendations For Management Of Diabetes During Ramadan: Update 2015

Recommendations For Management Of Diabetes During Ramadan: Update 2015

Abstract Since the first ADA working group report on the recommendations for management of diabetes during Ramadan in 2005 and our update in 2010, we received many inquiries asking for regular updates on information regarding education, nutritional habits and new oral and injectable agents that may be useful for the management of patients with diabetes during Ramadan. Patients can be stratified into their risk of hypoglycemia and/or complications prior to the start of the fasting period of Ramadan. Those at high risk of hypoglycemia and with multiple diabetic complications should be advised against prolonged fasting. Even in the lower hypoglycemia risk group, adverse effects may still occur. In order to minimize adverse side effects during fasting in patients with diabetes and improve or maintain glucose control, education and discussion of glucose monitoring and treatment regimens should occur several weeks prior to Ramadan. Agents such as metformin, thiazolidinediones and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors appear to be safe and do not need dose adjustment. Most sulfonylureas may not be used safely during Ramadan except with extreme caution; besides, older agents, such as chlorpropamide or glyburide, should not be used. Reduction of the dosage of sulfonylurea is needed depending on the degree of control prior to fasting. Misconceptions and local habits should be addressed and dealt with in any educational intervention and therapeutic planning with patients with diabetes. In this regard, efforts are still needed for controlled prospective studies in the field of efficacy and safety of the different interventions during the Ramadan Fast. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, wh Continue reading >>

Prayer And Fasting With Diabetes — Informed Clients Of Faith Can Avoid Serious Health Risks

Prayer And Fasting With Diabetes — Informed Clients Of Faith Can Avoid Serious Health Risks

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 7 P. 14 Many religious faiths recommend setting aside time for prayer and fasting—a sacred time to commune with God while abstaining from all food, drink, or both. Fasting can last for one day, seven days, one month, or longer. People of the Jewish faith fast for 25 hours from sundown to sundown during Yom Kippur. Muslims fast during the daylight hours for the entire month of Ramadan. And many Christians fast and pray for 40 days during the Lenten season or sporadically throughout the year when there’s a need to reinforce spiritual discipline, receive direction from God for their lives, or experience divine intervention during tough times. While fasting is a commendable spiritual practice, it’s one that could come with major health risks for people who have diabetes. Fasting During Ramadan Of all the spiritual fasts, Ramadan represents a particular challenge for people with diabetes and their healthcare providers. During the month of Ramadan, which begins at a different time each year according to the Islamic calendar, Muslims abstain from all food and drink, the use of oral medications, and smoking from just before dawn until sunset.1 In contrast, the 40-day fast during the Lenten season for Christians is less restrictive. Christians with or without diabetes may give up eating certain foods or meals throughout the season but not all food entirely, and they continue to take their medications, so they’re much less likely to develop health problems. For a Muslim with diabetes, going without food and drink for several hours per day and for days at a time often leads to serious complications. For this reason, healthcare providers have discouraged people with diabetes from fasting during Ramadan.1 According to the Islamic faith, Muslim Continue reading >>

Recommendations For Management Of Diabetes During Ramadan

Recommendations For Management Of Diabetes During Ramadan

Since our last publication about diabetes and fasting during Ramadan (1), we have received many inquires and comments concerning important issues that were not discussed in the previous document, including the voluntary 1- to 2-day fasts per week that many Muslims practice throughout the year, as well as the effect of prolonged fasting (more than 18 h a day) in regions far from the equator during Ramadan when it occurs in summer—a phenomenon expected to affect millions worldwide for the next 10–15 years. Since 2005, there have been substantial additions to the literature, including two studies examining the effect of structured education and support for safe fasting, both of which had promising results (2,3). In addition, new medications, such as the incretin-based therapies, have been introduced with less risk for hypoglycemia. According to a 2009 demographic study, Islam has 1.57 billion adherents, making up 23% of the world population of 6.8 billion, and is growing by ∼3% per year (4). Fasting during Ramadan, a holy month of Islam, is a duty for all healthy adult Muslims. The high global prevalence of type 2 diabetes—6.6% among adults age 20–79 years (5)—coupled with the results of the population-based Epidemiology of Diabetes and Ramadan 1422/2001 (EPIDIAR) study, which demonstrated among 12,243 people with diabetes from 13 Islamic countries that ∼43% of patients with type 1 diabetes and ∼79% of patients with type 2 diabetes fast during Ramadan (6), lead to the estimate that worldwide more than 50 million people with diabetes fast during Ramadan. Ramadan is a lunar-based month, and its duration varies between 29 and 30 days. Muslims who fast during Ramadan must abstain from eating, drinking, use of oral medications, and smoking from predawn to after Continue reading >>

Karva Chauth Fasting Tricky For Diabetics

Karva Chauth Fasting Tricky For Diabetics

On Karva Chauth, as per the custom, women observe a day-long fast and pray for their husband’s long life and good health. However, this may not be for everyone, especially those diagnosed with diabetes, doctors have warned. Beginning at sunrise, the fast lasts for about 12 to 15 hours and may or may not entail consuming a glass of water or juice in the afternoon. The fast is broken only once the moon rises. Good way to detox While the day-long fast is a good way to detoxify the system, and condition the body and mind, it is also imperative to assess the risks that it may pose for women with conditions such as diabetes, caution city doctors. They said that on the occasion of Karva Chauth, it is crucial to raise awareness about the implications of fasting without adequate precautions, especially for those with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Dr. Sanjay Kalra, Endocrinologist and vice-president, South Asian Federation of Endocrine Societies, said: “Intermittent fasting has many proven health benefits. However, in women living with diabetes, fasting, without adequate safe guards, can lead to hypoglycemia. Karva Chauth requires women to abstain from water all day. This can cause dehydration, dyselectrolytemia, and hypotension. Once the fast is completed, they tend to over indulge in food that is high in fat, carbohydrate, and calories. This can cause peaks of hyperglycemia and worsen glycemia variability. Those with Type 1 diabetes are at a higher risk of developing hypoglycemia. It is possible for women living with diabetes to enjoy this festival provided they take good care of their dietary regimen.” Early meal vital Doctors say that the meal before the fasting starts, consumed early in the morning, should ideally be a nutrient-rich meal as it will enable them to sustain Continue reading >>

Fasting And Diabetes

Fasting And Diabetes

Tweet Periods of fasting are undertaken by a number of religions. Fasting with diabetes requires careful diabetes management. The reasons for fasting can vary as can the durations and the conditions of the fasting. For reasons of health, people with diabetes may often be exempt from having to observe the fasting, or may be allowed more leeway in how they complete the fast. Should I fast if I have diabetes? It is best to fast only if you can be sure that the fasting will not cause any difficulties with your diabetes and your health. Religions will generally excuse people from fasting if the abstinence from nutrition could cause harm. Fasting is a period of abstinence from food or drink or both. People with complications of diabetes, such as eye problems, kidney damage or heart trouble are advised not to fast. Children, the elderly, pregnant women and people going through illness or disability may also commonly be exempt from taking part. Diabetes treatment during fasting Diabetes medication doses may need to be altered during a fast so it is important to check with your doctor before you begin the fast. During the fasting periods, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is a potential issue and can be dangerous. The other potential for danger or difficulty is in the breaking of the fast. When hungry, it may be more difficult to control which food you take in. If sweet foods or larger amounts of carbohydrate are eaten than would normally be, then this could push blood sugar levels too high. Diet around periods of fasting The way fasting is observed can vary between different religions. The length of time can vary quite significantly and some fasts may involve the eating of certain foods. If you are in doubt about the dietary aspect of the fast, arrange to speak with a dietitian. F Continue reading >>

Recommendations For Management Of Diabetes During Ramadan

Recommendations For Management Of Diabetes During Ramadan

It is estimated that there are 1.1–1.5 billion Muslims worldwide, comprising 18–25% of the world population (1,2). Fasting during Ramadan, a holy month of Islam, is an obligatory duty for all healthy adult Muslims. An ∼4.6% prevalence of diabetes worldwide (3) coupled with the results of the population-based Epidemiology of Diabetes and Ramadan 1422/2001 (EPIDIAR) study, which showed (in 12,243 people with diabetes from 13 Islamic countries) that ∼43% of patients with type 1 diabetes and ∼79% of patients with type 2 diabetes fast during Ramadan (4), lead to the estimation that some 40–50 million people with diabetes worldwide fast during Ramadan. Ramadan is a lunar-based month, and its duration varies between 29 and 30 days. Its timing changes with respect to seasons. Depending on the geographical location and season, the duration of the daily fast may range from a few to more than 20 h. Muslims who fast during Ramadan must abstain from eating, drinking, use of oral medications, and smoking from predawn to after sunset; however, there are no restrictions on food or fluid intake between sunset and dawn. Most people consume two meals per day during this month, one after sunset, referred to in Arabic as Iftar (breaking of the fast meal), and the other before dawn, referred to as Suhur (predawn). Fasting is not meant to create excessive hardship on the Muslim individual. The Koran specifically exempts the sick from the duty of fasting (Holy Koran, Al-Bakarah, 183–185), especially if fasting might lead to harmful consequences for the individual. Patients with diabetes fall under this category because their chronic metabolic disorder may place them at high risk for various complications if the pattern and amount of their meal and fluid intake is markedly altered Continue reading >>

What Is Ramadan?

What Is Ramadan?

Ramadan is the Islamic holy month where fasting is compulsory for all healthy Muslims every year. For Muslims, fasting is a time to go without food, liquids, tobacco, sexual activity and medication (including oral, inhaler and injection medications) between the hours of sunrise to sunset. Healthy Muslims will fast whilst continuing with their day to day routine and will also perform extra Taraweeh prayers, do good deeds and spend more time with family and friends at Iftar (fast breaking). This year, Ramadan starts on 18th June 2015 until or around 17th July 2015. Ramadan lasts for 29- 30 days each year depending on the sighting of the moon (Lunar Calendar). Eid-Ul-Fitr is celebrated when the new moon is sighted. There are approximately 2.5 million people who are Muslims in Britain, making Islam the 2nd largest religion. Exemptions Those who do not have to fast during this time include: Children The sick The elderly Those with learning difficulties Mentally infirm People who would be putting their health at serious risk by fasting i.e. those with long term conditions such as diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease Those who do not fast should give charity to the poor and can speak to their local Mosque for advice. In the following instances, the person can make up the fast at a later date, provide meals to the needy or give charity donations to the poor: Pregnant and nursing mothers Menstruating women If you are travelling If a fasting person becomes ill, they can end the fast anytime during the day. What Happens During The Fasting Month? In Ramadan a Muslim fasts from sunrise until sunset. A meal is usually eaten before dawn (known as SEHRI) this is highly recommended to prevent hypoglycaemia. Dawn prayers are then performed either at home (women) or Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fasting: How Is It For Diabetics When Fasting?

Diabetes And Fasting: How Is It For Diabetics When Fasting?

The month-long celebration of Ramadan started last week and religious people, including Christians throughout at various points throughout the year, take part in fasting. However, what is it like for those with diabetes, and especially are there concerns when it comes to their health when fasting? Keeping blood sugars in check, being compliant to medications and observing proper diet are important among diabetics who fast, say Oman experts, according to The Times of Oman report. "While it is alright for those with diabetes to fast...they do need to take certain precautions to safeguard their health," said Dr. V. C. P. Muhamed, an Internal Medicine specialist, in the news report. Kassem Allie, said in a news report from ABC that diabetes is an increasing concern among some. While fasting holds an exemption for people with medical issues like diabetes and pregnancy, Allie said that there are also some people who will still stick to the rituals. "People are disappointed they can't fast," Allie said pertaining to diabetics. He explained that some people are unwilling to give up fasting because it has become "a way of life." Still, health experts urge diabetics to be extra cautious when fasting. Diabetics may need to observe long periods without food when fasting, with those taking part in Ramadan fasting for up to 15-hours. Medics say this can increase hypoglycemia risk, and to tackle this, patients should take insulin to combat the effects. Meanwhile, Lisa Cimperman, a dietitian from the University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland Ohio, said in the ABC News report that Type 1 diabetics are less likely to be safe when fasting due to the delicate nature of the illness. As for Type 2 diabetics, Cimperman said that these people can just tweak their schedules to stabi Continue reading >>

10 Simple Tips For Biblical Fasting

10 Simple Tips For Biblical Fasting

Many people think about fasting for a variety of reasons. Perhaps you need to renew your body and soul. Maybe you're feeling sluggish or toxic and need to cleanse your body in short order. Or maybe you want to fast for spiritual reasons, such as a breakthrough in your personal life or for revival in this land. Whatever your reasons for fasting, here are 10 tips to ensure you fast smart: 1. Prepare your mind. Before you begin, think about why you want to fast. What do you want to achieve? It's important to have the right mindset before you start or you may lose heart early on. Pray for discipline and a strong will to complete the fast. 2. Stock up. Shop for everything you'll need before the day you begin. Not having everything you need on your first day is a sure way to fail. If you're doing a juice fast, for example, look at the recipes you'll be using, and make sure your shopping list has all the ingredients. 3. Drink water. Drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of purified water while you are fasting so you can flush away toxins and waste. This will also help you stay energized. Dehydration can cause you to feel tired and hungry. 4. Go easy. Gentle exercise, such as walking, is good, but don't overexert yourself. Your body is working hard to eliminate toxins, remove damaged cells and restore vitality. This important work is often not completed when we eat regular meals. That's because the body focuses its attention on digestion throughout the day. Fasting frees your body from this daily chore so it can work on cleansing, repairing and healing. It's like taking a week's vacation to thoroughly clean your home. While all this important work is going on inside, you want to give your body the rest it needs. Take more breaks. Avoid exhausting work. Go for walks. Get fresh Continue reading >>

Prayer And Fasting With Diabetes

Prayer And Fasting With Diabetes

"Declare a holy fast; call a sacred assembly. Summon the elders and all who live in the land to the house of the Lord your God, and cry out to the Lord." (Joel 1:14) In the July issue of Today's Dietitian, we published an article titled Prayer and Fasting With Diabetes. If you're a person of faith who has diabetes or know someone of faith with the disease, this article is a must-read. The American Diabetes Association reports that more than 23 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. Seventy-nine million have prediabetes, a condition characterized by elevated blood sugar levels, which place them at high risk for developing the disease later in life. And each year, there are now 1.5 million people newly diagnosed with diabetes. African Americans are disproportionately affected by this disease and suffer more complications, such as blindness, kidney failure, neuropathy, and heart disease, than other races. Given these statistics, you can surmise there are many people of faith with diabetes who set aside time to commune with God while abstaining from food, drink, or both. But the question is can they fast safely without putting their health at risk? In this article, we discuss that fasting is practiced by the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faiths and how these practices differ from one another. We review how fasting can impact the health of those with diabetes and provide strategies for fasting safely. Please let me know your thoughts about the article. If you have diabetes or know someone who has the disease and fasts safely, I'd like to hear about your experiences and theirs. I hope you enjoy the article as much as I did in assigning and editing it. * Linking up with Spiritual Sundays here. Continue reading >>

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