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Can Diabetics Eat Tostadas

Corn Tortillas Vs Flour Tortillas For Diabetics

Corn Tortillas Vs Flour Tortillas For Diabetics

Corn Tortillas vs Flour Tortillas for Diabetics Corn Tortillas vs Flour Tortillas for Diabetics Theres a lot of debate about whether flour or corn tortillas are healthier. Some will say that flour are healthier if you eat wheat tortillas. Ive always found it to the be the opposite. If youre a diabetic (like me), than corn tortillas, or tortillas de maz, are the way to go. And if you have to also eat gluten-free, like I do, you can enjoy corn tortillas without worry. They dont contain any gluten and theyre much easier to digest! Overall, corn tortillas are the safer bet. Why Corn Tortillas are Better for Diabetics Flour tortillas average about 18g carbs each and only 1g of fiber. A meal of 3 tacos with four tortillas would be a staggering 54 carbs! And these are not those large, burrito-sized tortillas youre thinking of. This is for regular-sized flour tortillas that fit in the palm of your hand. Its just not worth it. Especially if youre used to eating more than one or two tacos at your meal. Corn tortillas on the other hand are only8g carbs each and have four times as much fiber (4g)! If you have three tacos at your meal, thats only 24 carbs! At that rate, you could probably have another taco or two! TIP: When eating out at a Mexican restaurant, ask for two tacos and remove that second tortilla from each taco and split the filling in half. Or you can simply ask them to bring you four tacos and not double up on the tortillas. READ NEXT Ideas for Creative Activities That Can Improve Quality of Life #CareSupport If youre like me andyou love tacos, always try to stick to corn tortillas instead of the carb-loaded flour variation. It will help you stick to your diet and you wont have to miss out on those delicious tacos ever again. Continue reading >>

Are Tortillas A Good Option For Diabetics?

Are Tortillas A Good Option For Diabetics?

Tortillas are a staple in many Hispanic households; it’s something that we eat daily and in many different ways. We enjoy them as tacos, enchiladas, chips, corn, or flour. When you have diabetes, you have to be conscious about you eat and to make sure that your blood sugar level is kept under control. But like any other food you love, it’s important to know how to incorporate them into your diet, without going overboard. Are tortillas good for you? You know they taste good and it’s part of the Hispanic culture, so let’s explore the details. They contain essential nutrients, including fiber, vitamins, and minerals. A 12-inch tortilla can have 3.9 milligrams of iron, it also contains vitamin B-3, this is what breaks down fats, carbs, and proteins. One 6-inch corn tortilla has about 60 calories and a flour tortilla can have almost 100 calories. Both corn and flour tortillas are considered low-glycemic foods. This is what measures how rapid a carb enters your bloodstream and how high it raises your glucose levels. Join the conversation and share this story One of the drawbacks of tortillas is that they contain large amounts of salt. One 12-inch tortilla can provide 35% of the recommended maximum daily sodium intake. Especially for diabetics, it’s recommended that you choose the low-sodium tortillas whenever you can and keep count on how many you eat. Instead of having tacos, you might just want to have a burrito to keep the calorie count down. Tacos are great and everyone loves them, but someone who has diabetes should avoid high-fat toppings like sour cream and melted cheese. Try swapping healthier options like grilled chicken with non-fat Greek yogurt in your tacos and load it up with lettuce and tomato and salsa. If you have the taste for chips, then pop your t Continue reading >>

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

Through twenty-five years of working with people with diabetes, when they come in for diabetes education, their first question is most often “What can I eat (or drink).” The next question is often, “What can’t I eat (or drink)? In this article, we will explore what foods are best to eat when you have just been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes, and Type 2 Diabetes, and what foods are best avoided. Quick Links (click to jump to specific section) There is no other guide available on the internet that will guide you through the best foods to choose, and the best foods to avoid. Take heed, as some foods in the American diet are detrimental. These are also the same foods that Americans are addicted to. On occasion, you will be able to eat from the foods to avoid list, such as on a holiday, or your birthday. It shouldn’t become a regular occurrence to eat foods that are best avoided if you have Pre-Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes. Also, eating healthier throughout your lifespan, can prevent Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes from ever surfacing at all. Starting to eat a healthy diet can help you to reverse your Pre-Diabetes, along with regular physical activity, and sometimes medication (most often Metformin). You can either get Type 2 Diabetes in good control, or you can reverse it to a Pre-Diabetes state in some cases, if you work on healthy lifestyle changes. Though it’s not always possible to reverse Type 2 Diabetes, it is certainly worth a shot. My new book to come out soon, entitled, “The Practical Guide for the Reversal of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes,” published by The Diabetes Council, will explore this topic in depth. Stay tuned! Eating appropriate foods Knowing which foods to eat, and which ones to avoid, can help you to manage your blood sugars, and avoid Continue reading >>

Corn Tortillas On A Diabetes Diet

Corn Tortillas On A Diabetes Diet

A healthy, balanced diabetes diet should include plenty of nonstarchy vegetables and moderate amounts of whole grains, fruits, starchy vegetables, lean protein and low- or nonfat dairy, says the American Diabetes Association. Corn tortillas, which are prepared from masa, or ground corn flour, are considered a whole-grain food and can be included in a diabetic's diet in moderation. Ask your doctor or a dietitian if you need help developing a diet that can help you manage diabetes. Video of the Day Diabetics should focus their diet on foods with a low glycemic index. These are carbohydrate-rich foods that do not cause sharp fluctuations in your blood glucose level. Items with a score of 55 or less are considered low on the glycemic index scale. According to Harvard Health Publications, one corn tortilla has a glycemic index of 52, making it a preferred carbohydrate choice for diabetics. Whole-wheat bread has a higher glycemic index than corn tortillas, as do white rice and regular pasta. The ADA recommends that a diabetic should plan meals to consist of half nonstarchy vegetables, one-quarter lean protein and one-quarter whole grains or starchy vegetables. A single white or yellow corn tortilla -- the two are nutritionally identical -- would count as the entire whole-grain portion of your meal in this method. Throughout the course of the day, a diabetes diet should include six to 11 total servings of whole grains or starches. Diabetics need to control their weight and sodium intake to help lower their risk of high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease. Instead of frying corn tortillas in butter, lard or oil, heat them in the microwave, the oven, on the grill or in a nonstick skillet lightly coated with cooking spray. Fill the tortillas with grilled vegetables, poultry, Continue reading >>

Tostadas Salsa Verde

Tostadas Salsa Verde

These tostadas are a quick and tasty Mexican supper for any time. If the pepper jack cheese is too spicy, use regular Monterey Jack or cheddar. Source: Everyday Food, January/February 2006 2 1/2 cups (10 ounces) shredded chicken breasts, from Poached Chicken Breasts and Chicken Broth 1 cup jarred green salsa, plus more for serving (optional) 1/4 cup chopped, plus 2 tablespoons cilantro 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Arrange tortillas on a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle cheese evenly over tortillas; bake until golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes. 2. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, toss together chicken, salsa, 1/4 cup cilantro, and cumin. Spoon mixture evenly over tortillas; bake until heated through, about 8 minutes. 3. Top with lettuce, tomato, and sour cream. Sprinkle with remaining cilantro. Serve immediately, with additional green salsa, if desired. This was awesome! I used chedder instead of pepper jack and red salsa (just because that's all I had on hand). Then added a little avacado on top. Super fast and easy! Used rotisserie chicken instead of poached. Kids loved it. I would like the tortillas to be crispier next time, so I will experiement. This has been a family favorite for a while! It's a great way to use up leftover roast chicken if you don't have poached chicken. Also we have tried it with fresh salsa verde in addition to jarred. Recipe is terrific as is though! My family loves this recipe! We used authentic Mexican Chihuahua cheese instead of the pepper jack. Yummy! The recipe was easy, fast, fun, and a kid pleaser! Continue reading >>

Taco Bell - Restaurant Eating - Diabetes Forums

Taco Bell - Restaurant Eating - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi again, folks. Well, I decided to try to see what Taco Bell would do to me, as if the last incident with LJS wasn't enough for me. My husband and I were out grocery shopping, and I had to get a few things for my mom, and make a trip to the nursing home where she is, and the day grew long and involved, and we were both quite hungry, and we weren't able to go home anytime soon. So, we decided to eat at Taco Bell. I had a Taco Pizza, which consisted of two thin tortillas, bean/meat mixture, and cheese. Then, I had one regular taco, consisting of bean/meat mixture, cheese, sour cream, tomato and lettuce. Another hour after that, my reading was 133. I didn't think that was too bad. Of course, I injected myself with 12 units Humalog before eating. At least I know that if I am out somewhere, I know that for a quick meal, I can eat at Taco Bell! I won't vary the menu, either. I know for a fact that it works for me, and that's what I'll have, if we ever need to go back there. Another hour after that, my reading was 133. I didn't think that was too bad. Of course, I injected myself with 12 units Humalog before eating. At least I know that if I am out somewhere, I know that for a quick meal, I can eat at Taco Bell! I won't vary the menu, either. I know for a fact that it works for me, and that's what I'll have, if we ever need to go back there. The numbers are good to me. I would have been happy with that. BUT, for me if I eat something like taco bell I deal with it for at least another 24 hours. By that I mean I have liver dumping problems all the next day. But, that is me, doesn't mean it will happe Continue reading >>

Tostadas

Tostadas

Tostadas are a fabulous way to get your craving for Mexican food without eating too many carbs. Essentially, a tostada is an open-faced burrito, with a crispy tortilla bottom. What happens for me most of the time is that Ill have one, then go back for seconds, making my subsequent tostadas more of salads. If I forgo the tortilla, then I dont have to worry about going overboard with the carbs. You can make all sorts of tostadas: beef, carnitas, chicken, bean, avocado, cheese. My personal favorite is black bean, which Ill top with avocado. tomatoes, lettuce, cheese and some cilantro. Another favorite is this pork that we had in San Diego last year that was amazing. It had adobo marinated pork, avocado, and grilled pineapple. Wow. One of the best things Ive ever eaten. I need to go back there! If you want to make tostadas, its so easy. Simply make whatever meat/filling youd like to have. Then, set up all sorts of toppings that youd normally use for tacos. Some of my favorites are as follows: Continue reading >>

Tex-mex Food Ideas For Diabetics

Tex-mex Food Ideas For Diabetics

You may love Tex-Mex food, but if you are diabetic, you have to watch what you eat, particularly keeping an eye on the carbs and fats. That doesnt mean you have to give up on Tex-Mex completely because there are options out there that are low in calories and low in carbohydrates, foods such as beans, grilled vegetables and chicken. There is also salsa, made with tomatoes, herbs and spices. Here is a little checklist you can use to help you know what to eat and what not to eat Meals made with fried tortillas, such as chimichangas, taquitos and empanadas Fillings made of beans, grilled chicken or grilled steak Meals made with soft flour tortillas, such as burritos, tostadas, and carnitas Bean enchiladas with a little cilantro and onions Guacamole in small quantities is OK, as is avocado salad So, for example, if you want that margarita, you can replace the Triple Sec with orange extract and vodka. You still get a little sweetness and liquor but without all the extra sugar. If you want to make a taco, try slow cooking some skinless chicken breasts in a crockpot with enchilada sauce and green chilies and onions. You can put them on whole wheat tortillas with lettuce and tomatoes and a little (just a little) sour cream and cheese. You can make nachos without using any tortilla chips at all. Just grab some pickled jalapeno slices, sprinkle a little cheddar cheese on top and microwave. If you like enchiladas, you can try them with roasted vegetables. In this recipe, you fill the corn tortillas with a medley of roasted and cooked vegetables, such as pinto beans, mushrooms, onions, bell peppers, tomatoes, and mix them up with a variety of spices such as paprika, cumin, chili powder, cilantro, and garlic. Or you could try a version of guacamole made with zucchini instead of avoc Continue reading >>

Cheesy Beef Tostadas

Cheesy Beef Tostadas

* Nutrition information is estimated based on the ingredients and cooking instructions as described in each recipe and is intended to be used for informational purposes only. Please note that nutrition details may vary based on methods of preparation, origin and freshness of ingredients used. Rated 5 out of 5 by Missyrn02 from This is one of my families favorite recipes. This is one of my families favorite recipes. It is so easy.We also tear the tortilla shells to make it into a taco salad for a change in the recipe.I have made it for company. It's great for lunch and supper. Delicious! Rated 4 out of 5 by skmommy0325 from Mexican night is always a huge hit in our house. Mexican night is always a huge hit in our house. This was no exception. not to spicy, will adjust that next time. Flexable recipe that I will add or subtract ingredients according to my pantry. I think a little avacado on top would be delish. Rated 5 out of 5 by jogirl21 from Excellent. Excellent. I used ground turkey instead of the beef. It was a huge hit with two adults and three children. Rated 4 out of 5 by Hawkgirl01 from These were very good and a very quick meal. These were very good and a very quick meal. I do agree that the tortillas were chewy and not crispy, so I had to use a knife to cut the tortilla. I would suggest adding a bit of taco seasoning to the meat, it would have been bland otherwise. Rated 4 out of 5 by brat4infinity from I also put cumin, onion powder, and garlic powder in the meat.Instead of black beans I used refried... I also put cumin, onion powder, and garlic powder in the meat.Instead of black beans I used refried beans, but I am sure black beans would taste great as well.Tortillas can be used burrito style and folded around whatever you put inside. Rated 5 out of 5 by Di Continue reading >>

Mexican Anyone? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Mexican Anyone? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

So I've been craving Mexican food really bad. To the point that I dream about it and can taste it in my dreams. Has anyone had Mexican? What did you have and what were your numbers? Love Mexican!! I had a taco salad with shredded chicken pico salsa sour cream and rice and my number after was awesome! Right around 100 after two hours. I also had a couple chips with salsa:) oh and lots of cheese and avocado!! I'm Mexican, and cook Mexican food like 85% of the time. Yesterday I made flautas with chicken ate 4 and number was pretty high. Pretty sure it was the tortilla, so my fault but it's just so hard not to eat Mexican food. I have! I struggle with homemade tacos in the shells but when we go out I can have chips and salsa as well as enchilada suizas and be well within limits. Sides of beans and rice (not all) included. When I do eat Mexican food, I stick with small portion like 1 or 2 beef flauta make sure it's corn tortillas and not flour. Or 1 tostada, or one small Street taco. I've had success with tamales but tortillas, rice, and black beans all cause spikes. I'm pretty limited which makes me very sad. Didn't go well for me. I ordered chicken fajitas had two. Corn tortillas of course. Walked almost 2 hours. I scored a 129 and I've never gone over before ;(;(;( I do great with Mexican food. I typically skip the rice or have a very small portion and have some sort of plate with meat, beans, veggies, guacamole, salsa. Corn tortillas or tortilla chips don't spike my numbers but flour tortillas are out. Some people can't do beans but I can do a moderate portion with no problem. I just change up what I put the tacos in. I use 100% whole wheat tortillas and I get the med/small ones so it feels like I can have more ;) I love Mexican!!! I just can't eat anything corn based o Continue reading >>

Chicken Tostadas | Diabetic Living Online

Chicken Tostadas | Diabetic Living Online

In a 3 1/2- to 5-quart slow cooker combine jalapeno peppers, garlic, chili powder, lime juice, and hot pepper sauce. Add onion and chicken. Cover and cook on low-heat setting for 5 to 6 hours or on high-heat setting for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. Remove chicken and onion from cooker, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking liquid. Using two forks, shred chicken. In a medium bowl combine chicken, onion, and the 1/2 cup cooking liquid. Spread refried beans on tostada shells. Top with hot chicken mixture and shredded cheese. Serve with lettuce, salsa, sour cream, and olives. If desired, serve with lime wedges. *Test Kitchen Tip: Because chile peppers contain volatile oils that can burn your skin and eyes, avoid direct contact with them as much as possible. When working with chile peppers, wear plastic or rubber gloves. If your bare hands do touch the peppers, wash your hands and nails well with soap and warm water. For Easy Cleaning: Line your slow cooker with a disposable slow cooker liner. Add ingredients as directed in recipe. Once your dish is finished cooking, remove food from your slow cooker and simply dispose of the liner. Do not lift or transport the disposable liner with food inside. PER SERVING: 285 cal., 11 g total fat (4 g sat. fat), 86 mg chol., 606 mg sodium, 22 g carb. (5 g fiber, 2 g sugars), 25 g pro. Continue reading >>

Dining Out With Diabetes: Mexican Restaurants

Dining Out With Diabetes: Mexican Restaurants

Let’s face it, eating out is something we all like to do. It’s relaxing, convenient, and fun to let someone else worry about what to cook. For people with diabetes, it’s important to keep an eye on your plate – whether you’re at home or at a restaurant. It can be a challenge to find healthy options, but it’s not impossible. Mexican Dining: Learn the Language Should you order the Grande Chicken Taco Salad or the Chicken Fajita Salad? Or maybe you should you try the Chimichanga? The salads basically sound the same, right? No, not exactly. Both of the salads, from On the Border, are made with chicken and lettuce, but one of them comes in a big (grande) taco shell. The Grande Chicken Salad has about 1280 calories and 75 grams of carbs, while the Fajita Chicken Salad has about 750 calories and 25 grams of carbs. The fried tortilla shell makes a big difference in calories! Otherwise, a chicken salad with veggies and even beans is a healthy meal option. Chimichangas (1350 calories and 130 grams of carbs), along with their smaller relatives empandas and taquitos, are deep fried tortillas that are filled with meat, cheese, and some veggies. They can be much higher in calories, carbs, and fats than regular tacos and burritos. At Taco Bell, the Gordita (Spanish for “little fat one”) is wrapped in a thicker pita-style tortilla, which has 340 calories and 30 grams of carbs vs 200 calories and 15 grams of carbs in a regular crunchy taco. Avoid items with mega, grande, double-decker or supreme in their names – you will usually end up with at least 100 more calories per serving than the regular version. Familiarize yourself with descriptions of entrees before you order, as this way you can avoid extra calories and carbs. The Icing on the Taco Toppings at Mexican resta Continue reading >>

Fiesta Tostadas: Diabetes Forecast

Fiesta Tostadas: Diabetes Forecast

shredded Cheddar cheese, or use Mexican blend, Monterey Jack, or pepper Jack Preheat the oven to 425F. Line 2 large baking sheets with silicone baking mats or nonstick cooking spray. Put the tortillas on the baking sheets, spread a thin layer of refried beans on each (about 2 tablespoon per tortilla), and top each tortilla with about 1 tablespoon beans, 1 tablespoon avocado, 1 teaspoon corn, 1 teaspoon olives, and 1 tablespoon cheese (we like them best when spread lightly with the refried beans and not overloaded with toppings). Bake them for about 10 minutes until the tortillas get browned and crunchy. (Meanwhile, make the ranch dressing and cut up the vegetables, if you are serving them.) Serve the tostadas immediately. Do Ahead or Delegate: Slice the olives or sausage if using, and shred the Cheddar cheese if necessary, and refrigerate. Flavor Booster: Drizzle a little hot sauce, such as Tabasco, or fresh lime juice or sprinkle some crushed red pepper flakes on the tostadas at the table. Slow Cooker Directions: Avocados are not only heart-healthy, but they're also good for your mood. They are full of monounsaturated fat, which can help provide a mood boost. There are so many ways to enjoy avocados, but one of my favorites is spread ripe avocado onto whole-grain toast with a little lemon juice and sea salt. Continue reading >>

Baked Mexican Tostadas

Baked Mexican Tostadas

Pile the tasty toppings on these lighter Mexican tostadas with chicken, black beans and red peppers! In just a few days, Mark and I are headed away for a week of cruising around the Caribbean! I cant wait to check my to-do list at the door, spend all day swimming, and explore the tropical towns. I also plan to do some covert cocktail tasting work ya know, to get inspired for summer drink recipes and all. This year, swimsuit season has come far sooner than others for me, so in preparation Ive been getting more active and eating right. These delicious tostadas taste similar to everyones favorite fried version, but you save lots of calories with a baked tortilla, chicken instead of beef, and black beans instead of refried. Pile yours high with tasty toppings like roasted red peppers, green onions and pepper jack cheese , and scarf them down with a cold Corona and a Mexican food loving friend! Craving more? Keep in touch on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest and Instagram for new post updates and more. You can also check out my FAQ page, or contact me with any questions or inquiries! Continue reading >>

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

Although anyone may develop type 2 diabetes, this kind of diabetes is often caused by poor lifestyle choices, such as being overweight and not being physically active. Controlling your diet by avoiding typical fast-food choices can play a large role in helping control your blood sugar levels — a must when managing type 2 diabetes. Taking this important step may even reduce the amount of medication you need to take each day. But there are many reasons that you might need to rely on fast-food restaurants. For instance, you may work late hours or be pressed for time, and fast food might be the most convenient, or even the only, option available to you. There's no denying that these quick-bite chains seem to be everywhere — the United States has about 7.52 fast-food restaurants per 100,000 residents, according to a study published in December 2011 in the journal Critical Public Health. If you do find yourself needing to order at the drive-thru, don't fret. The key is knowing what to order to get the nutrition you need without jeopardizing your health. Type 2 Diabetes: Better Fast-Food Choices Common sense says that fast food isn't likely to be on the preferred-foods list for people with diabetes. After all, a typical fast-food breakfast can put you at or over your daily limit for fat, cholesterol, and carbohydrates. But many fast-food restaurants offer smart choices that can help you get the nutrition you need with the convenience you desire. For starters, fast food doesn’t have to mean fat-laden fare. Planning ahead is key, says Jenny Dejesus, NP, CDE, a diabetes educator at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. Many fast-food chains now feature healthier choices, and these are the restaurants you want to go to. “If possible, look at the menu ahead of time Continue reading >>

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