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Can Diabetics Eat Subs

Getting Fit With Subway: Healthy Eating On-the-go!

Getting Fit With Subway: Healthy Eating On-the-go!

Getting Fit with SUBWAY…Healthy Eating On-the-GO! The following post is sponsored by FitFluential LLC on behalf of SUBWAY: I love SUBWAY! That’s right, the person who is always talking about weight control eats sandwiches. I just returned from the Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo in Atlanta. Otherwise known as FNCE, it’s the Super Bowl of nutrition for registered dietitians, about 8,000 of us in fact. As a FitFluential Ambassador, I had the good fortune of sharing a fantastic breakfast with SUBWAY’s amazing RD, Lanette Kovachi, Jenna Braddock (a fellow FFA, RD and friend), as well as the awesome SUBWAY team. We all talked about SUBWAY’s initiatives and transparency in striving to continually improve their already impressive menu. A long-time fan, I knew that SUBWAY offered many healthy choices for any meal of the day, and for the whole family. I was even more impressed by the strides SUBWAY has taken over the past several years to improve the nutritional quality of their delicious menu items. Did you know that SUBWAY was the first quick service restaurant with meals to earn the American Heart Association’s Heart-Check Mark? Cool, right? What does that mean? That SUBWAY takes wellness to heart! The American Heart Association certifies that all FRESH FIT meals contain: * 700 calories or less * 30% or less calories from fat * 26 grams of less of total fat * 5 grams or less of saturated fat * 900 mg or less of sodium * 105 mg or less of cholesterol * At least 10% of the daily value of 1 of 6 beneficial nutrients As a very busy mom and dietitian, I can honestly say that SUBWAY has saved me many times. It’s reassuring that I can enjoy a veggie packed meal at the right calorie level for me, for a great price and super convenience. For complete nutrition inf Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Beef?

Can Diabetics Eat Beef?

People with diabetes can eat just about any type of food as part of a balanced, portion-controlled meal or snack. The trick is knowing how much of each type of food to eat. A standard serving of lean beef, as part of a sandwich or plate of food that also includes vegetables and whole-grain foods, is a well-balanced meal for a diabetic. People with diabetes are at increased risk of developing heart disease, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. As a result, the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association is a heart-healthy, plant-based diet that includes lower-fat sources of protein such as lean beef, but in measured portions. Lean cuts of beef that contain less than 10 grams of fat and less than 4.5 grams of saturated fat in a 3-1/2 ounce serving include tenderloin, strip steak, shoulder roast, round steak and 95 percent lean ground beef. Extra-lean cuts of beef that contain less than 5 grams of fat and 2 grams of saturated fat per serving include tenderloin, eye of round roast, top round, bottom round and top sirloin. Both lean and extra-lean cuts contain less than 95 milligrams cholesterol per serving. Choice and select cuts contain less fat than prime cuts. According to the American Diabetes Association, a balanced meal includes 2 to 5 ounces of meat. Another way for diabetics to look at it is that beef and other proteins should take up about one-quarter of the plate at each meal. A good diet includes lots of whole-grain foods and fresh fruits and vegetables. Grilling, broiling, pan-broiling, stir-frying, roasting and braising are all good methods of preparing lean cuts of beef, according to the Texas Beef Council. Different cuts of beef lend themselves to different methods. Eye round or sirloin steak is best sli Continue reading >>

Healthy Lunch With Cold Cuts

Healthy Lunch With Cold Cuts

Vegetables increase the nutritional value of your sandwich. What Kind of Cold Water Fish Are Healthy to Eat? A sandwich is simple to prepare with a variety of cold cuts, but the kinds you choose can make or break the nutritional value of your lunch. Certain cold cuts contain large amounts of fat, but other varieties are low in fat and supply essential nutrients. Choose a healthy cold cut and combine it with plenty of nutritious ingredients, and you'll have a lunch that is tasty and healthy. Salami, bologna, pepperoni and olive loaf might be tasty, but they are loaded with saturated fat and sodium. One slice of salami contains 3.19 grams of fat, 1.14 grams of which are saturated. The same slice has 178 milligrams of sodium. A 3.5-ounce serving of bologna, which is about 2 slices, contains 24.59 grams of fat, 9.3 grams of which are saturated. Bologna has 960 milligrams of sodium per serving. When you eat too much saturated fat and sodium, you're at an increased risk for heart disease and diabetes. Choose lower-fat varieties of cold cuts to increase the nutritional value of your lunch. A 3.5-ounce serving of ham contains 3.61 grams of fat, only 1 gram of which is saturated. A 3.5-ounce serving of turkey has less than 1 gram of total fat. Sliced chicken and roast beef are low in saturated fat as well. These cold cuts can still be quite high in sodium, so stick to one serving to keep your salt intake lower. These cold cuts also supply a healthy dose of protein, iron and zinc. Make a protein-packed sandwich with lean cold cuts such as ham or turkey. Use whole-wheat bread to increase the fiber content. Layer on a variety of vegetables such as romaine lettuce, tomatoes, red onions, cucumbers and bell pepper strips. Top the vegetables with a slice of low-fat cheddar or pepper j Continue reading >>

Sandwiches And Wraps, Great For Diabetics | Diabetes Daily Post

Sandwiches And Wraps, Great For Diabetics | Diabetes Daily Post

Sandwiches and Wraps, Great for Diabetics Sandwiches and wraps, great for diabetics. When it comes to quick and easy meals, boredom does not need to be an option! We often get stuck in our food choice rut, which might promote indulging later on in foods that dont help much with our health, weight or diabetes control. Avoid the rut and enjoy tasty, filling healthful options in a convenient and easy way with wraps or sandwiches that spice up your daily menu. Instead of limited recipes, were going to provide ideas to mix and match to your liking and you might think of more ways to add to this list: Wonderful wraps, best breads: Heres where you can fit in heart healthy whole grain and fiber sources into your day. Look for 100% whole wheat or whole grain on the label. Be careful of heavy, dense bagels if you are watching your weight or concerned about after-meal blood sugar spikes use the lighter versions. Though not 100% whole grain, some choices such as rye and sourdough breads do have a lower glycemic index and can add variety and contrast to meals. Watch out for croissants, biscuits and sweet breads- these are refined carbs and higher in fat, sodium and calories. Spread on the flavor: We used to think fat was bad but using healthful fat sources help our body absorb essential vitamins, enhance flavors of foods and actually keep us feeling full longer. Olive oil, avocado and nut butters are great examples of health healthy fats, but its still important to be watchful of portions for weight control. Nut butters are an especially good choice as they are not only excellent sources of healthful fats, but add protein and many essential nutrients, and can be a great back up plan any time of day. Choose natural style nut butters and pair up with good quality fruit spreads. Musta Continue reading >>

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

Dining out with diabetes Contrary to popular belief, a diabetes diagnosis doesn't mean you have to spend your days eating flavorless fare. It's completely possible to enjoy delicious food—even at a restaurant, as long as you know exactly what to order, how it's prepared, and what an appropriately sized portion looks like. Since not everyone with diabetes has the same meal plan or health goals, we set out to create the most comprehensive list of diabetes-friendly restaurant dishes, whether you're cutting calories or keeping salt, carbs, or fats to a minimum. Read on for nutritionist-approved orders from Chinese and Italian restaurants, delis, smoothie shops, and other popular eateries. Plus, don't forget to be on the lookout for these menu words to avoid. At American restaurants: Turkey burger with steamed broccoli When you're dining at your local sports bar or diner, Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN, says that a turkey burger is the way to go. "Remove the top bun, which doesn't typically contain much fiber and swap fries for a green veggie. This will add fiber to your meal and help slow blood sugar spikes and promote satiety," she explains. Here's how to get more fiber in your diet. At American restaurants: Beef burger with a salad If you prefer a beef burger, Smith suggests pairing one with a salad (sorry, no fries) and a vinegar-based dressing on the side. Ditch the top bun to keep empty carbs off your plate and say "no thanks" to cheese to keep excess salt and fat to a minimum. At American restaurants: Filet mignon Feeling fancy? Order a filet with a sweet potato and side of non-starchy vegetables such as spinach or broccoli, suggests Miriam Jacobson, RD, CDN. "Sometimes a steak can be the healthiest item on the menu. Just beware of portion sizes. It should be the size of Continue reading >>

Eating Well At Fast Food Restaurants

Eating Well At Fast Food Restaurants

Here’s a little secret for those of you looking to eat right: Fast food restaurants don’t have to be your enemy. That’s right, those brightly lit temples paying tributes to burgers, and fries, and nuggets can provide decent meals if you’re in a rush. The key, as always, is to be careful and informed about the choices you make. No one-possibly not even the restaurants themselves-will say you should eat fast foot three times a day, seven days a week. And it’s best to prepare your own healthy food at home as often as you can. But people with diabetes are all-too-familiar with compromise. We have to compromise to live, given how demanding this condition can be. And the restaurants themselves have made the task easier in recent years. They have added more and healthier options. They have made nutrition facts more easily available. They aren’t charities, of course-the job of these chains is still to sell you as much fattening food as possible-but the situation is better than it used to be. Here’s a list of six of the healthiest meals from major fast-food chains. I’ve arranged them based on amount of carbs, going from lowest to highest. Carbohydrates aren’t the only important nutrition information, of course, but they are how most people with diabetes calculate insulin dosage, and they do have the most direct impact on blood sugar. A couple of disclaimers before we begin. First, these meals are not, by most standards, “low-carbohydrate.” They should be thought of as lower or moderate carb. Second, you can always go to a restaurant and order a plain green salad, without dressing, and be healthy. My goal here is to point out actual menu items that you might want to eat.. All of the figures are taken from the chains’ respective websites, which means they s Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Meat (1 ounce = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbohydrate, fat varies) One ounce of meat is about the size of your thumb; 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards. No more thant 3 ounces of protein at a meal is recommended. (Try to eat meats from this page only; unfortunately, this means nothing fried.) Very Lean Meat Choices (0-1g fat/ounce and 35 calories) Poultry: Chicken or turkey (white meat, no skin), Cornish hen (no skin). Fish: Fresh or frozen cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, lox, tuna fresh or canned in water. Shellfish: Clams, crab, lobster, scallops, shrimp. Game: Duck or pheasant (no skin), venison, buffalo, ostrich. Cheese: Fat-free (less than 1 gram of fat/ounce), low fat cottage cheese. Other: Processed sandwich meats with less than 1 gram fat or less/ounce, such as: deli thin, shaved meats chipped beef, turkey ham egg whites (2) egg substitutes, plain hot dogs, fat free sausage, fat free or less than 1 gram fat/ounce Lean Meat Choices (3g fat/ounce and 55 calories) Beef: USDA Select or Choice grades trimmed of fat such as round, sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, roast (rib, chuck, rump); steak (T-bone, porter house, cubed); ground round. Pork: Lean pork such as fresh ham, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, tenderloin, center loin chop. Lamb: Roast, chop or leg. Veal: Leap chop, roast. Poultry: Chicken, turkey (dark meat, no skin), chicken (white meat, with skin), domestic duck or goose (well-drained of fat, no skin). Fish: Herring (uncreamed or smoked), Oysters, Salmon (fresh or canned), catfish, Sardines (canned), tuna (canned in oil, drained). Game: Goose (no skin, rabbit). Cheese: 4.5% fat cottage cheese, grated parmesan, cheeses with 3 grams of fat or less/ounce. Other: Hot dogs with 3 grams of fat or less per ounce. Processed sand Continue reading >>

8 Diet Expert-approved Orders At Subway

8 Diet Expert-approved Orders At Subway

Remember that Jared guy? The face of Subways now-famous ads claims hes kept the weight off for 15 years with the chains sandwiches. Remember that Jared guy? The face of Subways now-famous ads claims hes kept the weight off for 15 years with the chains sandwiches. While we applaud his success, we recommend listening to the advice of our experts instead of a college student-turned-spokesman if youre going to turn to Subway for a quick and convenient meal that will help you lose weight . Check out their ordering advice and tips below. "I visit Subway once a week with my oldest son on his way home from a long day in after school activities. We grab a sandwich for dinner and I love the healthier choices they have introduced in the past few years. My other go-to at Subway is simply a bowl of the black bean soup and the veggie delight salad with added fresh avocado. Loaded with fiber, this meal is vegetarian, filling, flavorful, heart-healthy, void of all refined flour and full of antioxidants." Amy Shapiro, MS, RD, CDN, Real Nutrition NYC "I eat at Subway at least once a week. Being an entrepreneur and working 60 hours a week, I need some convenience in my life while keeping on the healthy track. If I were working out that day, Id choose a 6-inch whole-wheat sub (to give me some energy for my workout), with roasted chicken (which has lean protein to build muscle), lettuce, tomato, onions, green peppers and cucumbers. For my condiment, I use Dijon mustard rather than mayo because its low-cal but still has lots of flavor." Jim White, ACSM Health Fitness Instructor, Registered Dietitian, ADA National Spokesman, Owner of Jim White Fitness & Nutrition Studios "If stopping into Subway before 11am, I would order the Breakfast Egg and Cheese with no cheese, but with guacamole, spina Continue reading >>

Are Cold Cuts Healthy?

Are Cold Cuts Healthy?

What you should know about deli meats before you make your next sandwich. Recipe to Try: Turkey Apple Cheddar Sandwich Deli turkey, ham and roast beef are the most commonly eaten cold cuts in the U.S. Adding these sliced deli meats to your sandwich can make for a tasty lunchand they're convenient, too. But you might be wondering if processed deli meat is healthy or not. We break down the latest science and what you need to know to shop for healthy cold cuts. FYI: If you're pregnant, make sure to heat up your cold cuts before eating to reduce any risk of Listeria. Don't Miss: Cheap, Healthy Lunches to Pack for Work Eating cold cuts is convenient. No cutting or cooking. Simply buy the meat, slap it on a sandwich or in a wrap, and head out the door. They are also high in protein and beneficial vitamins and minerals such as iron, zinc, and vitamin B12. On the flip side, they are high in sodium and some are high in saturated fat, both of which you'll want to be especially wary of if you have heart disease or high blood pressure. Eating high amounts of processed meats increases risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes. This is related to many factors, but one culprit is sodium. Sodium is about 400 percent higher, on average, in processed meats than unprocessed meats. "Too much sodium stiffens our blood vessels and stresses our heart and kidneys," says Sam Teece, M.P.H., R.D., a chef and dietitian at Sam Teece Nutrition Consulting. The American Heart Association recommends eating no more than 2,300 mg of sodium per day (for some groups even less), but we're taking in much more. Kids in the U.S. eat an average of 3,279 mg of sodium per day, and adults average more than 3,400 mg/day. With cold cuts, the sodium adds up quickly given that just one ounce of deli turkey can have Continue reading >>

8 Diet Expert-approved Orders At Subway

8 Diet Expert-approved Orders At Subway

Remember that Jared guy? The face of Subways now-famous ads claims hes kept the weight off for 15 years with the chains sandwiches. Remember that Jared guy? The face of Subways now-famous ads claims hes kept the weight off for 15 years with the chains sandwiches. While we applaud his success, we recommend listening to the advice of our experts instead of a college student-turned-spokesman if youre going to turn to Subway for a quick and convenient meal that will help you lose weight . Check out their ordering advice and tips below. "I visit Subway once a week with my oldest son on his way home from a long day in after school activities. We grab a sandwich for dinner and I love the healthier choices they have introduced in the past few years. My other go-to at Subway is simply a bowl of the black bean soup and the veggie delight salad with added fresh avocado. Loaded with fiber, this meal is vegetarian, filling, flavorful, heart-healthy, void of all refined flour and full of antioxidants." Amy Shapiro, MS, RD, CDN, Real Nutrition NYC "I eat at Subway at least once a week. Being an entrepreneur and working 60 hours a week, I need some convenience in my life while keeping on the healthy track. If I were working out that day, Id choose a 6-inch whole-wheat sub (to give me some energy for my workout), with roasted chicken (which has lean protein to build muscle), lettuce, tomato, onions, green peppers and cucumbers. For my condiment, I use Dijon mustard rather than mayo because its low-cal but still has lots of flavor." Jim White, ACSM Health Fitness Instructor, Registered Dietitian, ADA National Spokesman, Owner of Jim White Fitness & Nutrition Studios "If stopping into Subway before 11am, I would order the Breakfast Egg and Cheese with no cheese, but with guacamole, spina Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Choices At A Sub Shop Restaurant - Cooking Light

Best And Worst Choices At A Sub Shop Restaurant - Cooking Light

Menu Navigator: Best (and Worst) Choices at a Sub Shop We'll show you the healthiest choices (and splurge-only dishes) to help you order wisely at sub shops. Theres a reason Subway has emerged as the worlds biggest fast-food chain: A simple sub sandwich makes a satisfying and reasonably healthy meal. Veer off in the wrong direction, though, and you can easily consume more than 1,000 calories, not including the inevitable chips and soda. Sodium is a big issue, too: Many sandwiches supply more than half a days worth, thanks to ingredients like deli-style ham, salami, and cheese. And, of course, saturated fat: Meats and cheeses are major contributors, but so are creamy dressings and sauces. A smart sub choice doesnt have to be sawdust-dry or beige-boring. A slice of cheese boosts flavor for only 50 to 120 calories. Dressing can add 110 to 240 calories, so ask for it on the side. Use about a tablespoon to keep the calorie count near 100, or choose low-calorie dressing or honey mustard for about 50 calories.We analyzed 6-inch options from U.S. restaurants. Nutrition numbers are estimates: Results vary widely among restaurants. Bulk It Up: Ask for extra lettuce, tomato, cucumber, and other veggiesthey lend moisture, nutrients, texture, and heft to your sandwich, leaving you more satisfied. Go For Grains: Add fiber and appealing nutty flavor by ordering your sandwich on whole-grain or multigrain breads, or breads topped with nuts, seeds, or oats. Chicken sounds like a smart option, but once bacon, cheese, and ranch dressing are piled on, your sub is sunk. Combined, they deliver about half a days worth of saturated fat. Full-fat ground beef and cheese send calories soaring, and tomato sauce escalates the sodium. If you absolutely need a meatball fix, order a 6-inch and split i Continue reading >>

19 Places Where Diabetics Can Safely Eat Out

19 Places Where Diabetics Can Safely Eat Out

Diabetics know they should limit carbohydrates, fats, and sugar and up their intake of fiber. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association suggest that 45 percent of daily calories should come from carbohydrates, with 45 to 60 grams per meal, and most of those from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Additionally, New York nutritionist Laurie Simon suggests limiting any one meal to 10 grams of sugar or less. That's difficult enough eating at home; sticking to the rules at restaurants can be even harder -- but it can be done. Continue reading >>

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a progressive disease with many potential complications. These include blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, and loss of toes, feet, or legs. Roughly 1 in every 11 people in the United States currently has diabetes, but although the condition may be familiar, it is hardly harmless. It is the country's seventh leading cause of death, and people with diabetes have a 50 percent higher risk of death than those without the condition. Fortunately, even though diabetes is a chronic disease, it can be managed. One way that complications can be prevented is by following dietary guidelines. Classic lunch ingredients that are good for people with diabetes With planning and conscious eating, people with diabetes can safely enjoy a satisfying and varied diet. The following common lunch items can also be part of a healthful lunch for people with diabetes: canned tuna or salmon hard-boiled eggs salads with dressing on the side low-salt soups and chili whole fruit, such as apples and berries cottage cheese plain, unsweetened Greek yogurt peanut or almond butter Lunch ideas People who need to control their blood sugar can still select from a wide variety of options when they are looking for a tasty lunch. The following lunch ideas provide about 3 servings of carbohydrates each, or about 45 grams (g), or less: soup and salad, such as tomato soup with a kale-apple salad whole-wheat wrap (tortilla = 30 g carbs or less), such as turkey with hummus, cucumber, tomatoes, feta cheese, and olives spinach salad with canned tuna, ½ mayonnaise, ½ Greek yogurt, celery, and lemon juice, served over greens and diced apple hard-boiled egg served with five whole-wheat crackers, string cheese, a piece of fruit, and veggie sticks with peanut butter smoothie made with 1 cup frozen Continue reading >>

Is Subway Okay? - Restaurant Eating - Diabetes Forums

Is Subway Okay? - Restaurant Eating - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was diagnosed with type II a couple of days ago, it's been a difficult change. I commute to work, so I have eat out usually. I was wondering if anyone had tried a subway club on the wrap bread, I just had one filled with meat/cheese/veggies -- it was kind of bland bread, but the nutrition info looked like what my Doc recomended. My main question is right now I'm in a lowering phase. I was getting readings close to 400, now I'm usually 200 in the morning before eating and can spike up to 270, considering that I'm still lowering is this a BAD spike? Welcome DK Kid! Glad you found the forum. Lots of good info here. Regarding Subway, I've had their wraps a couple of times without problems. There's a great website "dietfacts.com" that lists restaurants and their menus to include carbs and fiber and fat. If we're going out to eat, I look up the menu and decide ahead of time what i'm having....less temptation to be bad that way. Calorie King also has a book and website you might want to refer to. I've printed out menus from our favorite places and keep them in the car to refer to if we're out and about and decide to eat. Sounds like your #'s are moving in the right direction, but still have a ways to go. I was told to aim for 140 or less 2 hrs after the first bite of my meals. Fasting goal was 110 or less. I would also encourage you to exercise regularly and watch your carb intakes, avoiding bread, pasta, rice, potatoes and sugar, esp. here at first while your #'s are higher than you want. Do you have a monitor? If not, get one and test often. 2 hrs after your first bite of food is good, as you'll Continue reading >>

How Much Fat In A Subway Tuna Sub?

How Much Fat In A Subway Tuna Sub?

Subway is one of the healthier options for eating a fast food meal. Some of your choices at Subway are low in fat and calories and supply certain vitamins and minerals. The tuna sub from Subway contains a large amount of total fat, but the majority of it is heart-healthy unsaturated fat, making the sub a better option than other choices, such as the cold-cut sub or the pepperoni melt. Your body needs fat to help you absorb nutrients from your food and give you energy. Too much fat, however, can be harmful to your health. Diets high in fat can lead to unhealthy weight gain, diabetes and certain types of cancer. Saturated fat and trans fat are particularly dangerous because they can elevate your LDL, or bad, cholesterol levels and increase your risk of heart disease. Trans fats also lower your HDL, or good, cholesterol levels, which also puts you at a higher risk for cardiovascular disease. When it comes to eating fat, the majority of your fat intake should be from unsaturated fats found in foods like olive oil, fatty fish, avocados and nuts. Unsaturated fats help lower cholesterol levels and can also decrease your risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. Adding omega-3 fatty acids, which are present in most types of fish, can protect you against an irregular heart beat and can help regulate your blood pressure. A 6-inch tuna sub from Subway contains 24 grams of total fat, of which only 4 grams are saturated. The sandwich doesn't contain any trans fats. This nutrition information doesn't include cheese. Cheddar cheese adds 5 grams of total fat, of which 3 grams are saturated. Provolone or pepper jack cheese each add 4 grams of total fat, of which 2 to 2.5 grams are saturated. A tablespoon of mayonnaise increases the fat content by an additional 12 grams, of Continue reading >>

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