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Can Diabetics Eat Rotis?

Chapati's Effect On Blood Sugar

Chapati's Effect On Blood Sugar

Hello Friends, My name is Harshit Aggarwal and I'm a diabetic for the past 1 year in India. Whenever I eat chapatis (3 to 4), my blood sugar spikes. Oneday, I ate 4 chapatis with moong dal and my sugar spiked from 91 to 159. My grandmother says mix besan with wheat flour and it will not spike blood sugars. Is this really true? If not, please suggest what I can do so that my blood sugars don't spike as much. Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bajra?

Can A Diabetic Eat Bajra?

Want to know if a diabetic can eat bajra? Here is the answer along with its other health benefits. Pavitra Sampath | Updated: May 21, 2014 1:13 pm I am a 37-year-old man and have been diagnosed with diabetes. My doctor has asked me eat right, exercise and take my medicines on time. I am making the required changes in my lifestyle but am a bit confused about my diet. My doctor told me that I should eat foods with a low glycaemic index, so I wanted to know if eating bajra is good for me? Can a diabetic eat bajra? Bajra is a food which has a lower glycemic index when compared to rice and wheat. Basically, this means that it raises the blood sugar level very slowly compared to other cereals. It also has higher fibre content and keeps you feeling full for a longer time. Apart from that it also has a number of other benefits like: Is high in proteins with a good amount of amino acids, which helps in strengthening muscles and immune system. It is a good source of iron, which helps formation of hemoglobin in blood thus preventing anaemia. It is also a moderate source of vitamin B1, which is required for a healthy nervous system. Therefore, it makes it a very good option for diabetics. To know more about how you can include bajra into your diet, read about the recipe for healthy bajra roti. Read more about causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes . Continue reading >>

Roti Chapati

Roti Chapati

Roti or Chapati Roti is the Staple Indian Bread which is consumed in almost every North Indian Meal, Main constituents of Roti are Carbohydrates and some proteins together with other nutrients in smaller quantities. Important Things about Roti for a Diabetic: Size approx. 6 inches in Diameter Thickness 2-3 mm. Atta- Flour for Dough Coarse wheat flour OR even better to use a mizture of Soya Bean and Chana with wheat flour and add wheat bran to it. in the following proportions: Wheat Flour 'Gehu Atta' 3 parts Soyabean Flour 1 parts Chana Flour 1 part Wheat Bran 1 part Quantity Average Diabetic adult is recommended 2-3 Rotis in a meal, 1/2 Roti may be reduced in order to accomodate 1 katori of boiled rice (Individual recommendations may vary, depending on BMI and other factors) Optional Mix one tbspn of fenugreek ( methi seeds) soaked overnight, drained and then crushed,- this makes the Roti even better for Diabetics. Advantages of this Roti: Low Glycemic Index Such a Roti has lower Glycemic Index than all other Indian breads ( Roti's- Parathas( High in calories) ,Naan, Rumali & Tandoori Roti), Hence it is absorbed more slowly and does not cause surge in glucose blood levels ( causing post prandial Hyperglycemia). Low Calorific value The Total calorific value of this roti is not very high, one roti provides approx. 85 kcals. Nutritious Roti not only provides calories to keep us going but is also an important source of proteins- in fact in rural Indian Diets it may be the most valuable source of protein. Improve Satiety Roti provides sense of fullness and a sense of satiety, which is essential to regulate food intake and diet Consult Dietician for individualized Diabetic diet Call 011 22710663 or 9899764447 for appointments Continue reading >>

Which Is Better Choice For A Diabetic: Roti Or Rice

Which Is Better Choice For A Diabetic: Roti Or Rice

Rice & Roti are the staple foods in most parts of our country,no Indian meal is complete without any of these. Diabetics need to be careful of their dietary choices. Rice and chapati can be eaten by diabetics in moderate quantity. Rice & roti both have similar carbohydrate and caloric value, but they differ in their nutritional value because roti contains more fiber, proteins and minerals. Most commonly people use polished rice which looks white due to removal of fiber rich covering (bran & husk), with this process most of the micro-nutrients are lost. Brown rice is little high in fiber, which causes your body to digest slowly. Rice is easier to digest because of its starch content, whereas roti digests slowly. This promotes satiety and keeps you full for longer time, which is a big plus for diabetics in maintaining blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a comparative measure of a carbohydrate foods and their impact on blood sugars. A food with high GI raises blood sugar than foods with low or medium GI. The glycemic index of long grain white rice is around 73, the glycemic index of brown rice is about 68 and the glycemic index of whole wheat chapati is about 62, so whole wheat chapatiand brown rice are better choice than white rice for diabetics. People who are gluten intolerant can switch to brown rice. To meet all the requirements instead of avoiding completely they can use brown rice atone meal and whole wheat roti at another meal. For better results, consult your dietician to help chose the best staple food. Diabetes is not a disease it's a way of life! Many of you would agree that diabetes management reflects how well you balance and live your life Experts say diabetes is not only genetic but obesity and inactivity is leading to it in young people and is on the v Continue reading >>

What Is More Healthy-rice Or Chapati?.

What Is More Healthy-rice Or Chapati?.

Nowadays people think that rice or chapati is sole reason for obesity. This article will make sure that both are important if taken correctly. Rice vs chapati (wheat roti) is a very common and controversial topic; both these grains being the staple food in many parts of the globe. People blame rice for causing obesity, diabetes and related conditions. Is it really true? Basically, we most commonly use polished / white rice, which looks white due to the removal of fiber-rich outer covering (husk and bran). During this process, most of the micro-nutrients (vitamins and minerals) are washed away. Thus white rice is devoid of B complex vitamins, iron, calcium etc. Whole wheat flour, the main ingredient in chapatis, is high in fiber (unless sieved) , protein and minerals like iron, calcium, selenium, potassium and magnesium. Some other important considerations are- 1. Chapatis are higher in sodium and potassium content. Rice doesn’t contain any sodium (unless salt is added) and contains very little potassium. Thus for people on sodium & potassium restricted diets, rice could be a better choice than chapati. 2. Rice is easy to digest as it is low in fibers. Thus for people with loose stools / diarrhea, indigestion etc. rice is a good choice. 3. For people who manage their diabetes & diet plan, eating whole wheat chapati is a better alternative. White rice has a higher glycemic index than chapati , which means, it increases blood sugar more rapidly. Thus chapati is always a preferred option for diabetic individuals. 4. For those who are overweight & obese, chapati is a better choice as it contains more fibers. Eating rice more often, more in quantity and especially at dinner can lead to weight and fat gain. Thus, nutrient content-wise, chapatis are healthier than rice. Brown Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Diabetes: North India And Pakistan Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: North India And Pakistan Diets

Eating well with Diabetes: North India and Pakistan diets Many staple foods in the North Indian diet are good for your health. From fresh mango to lentils to cauliflower, there are many nutrient-rich choices. However, deep fried items, high-fat foods and refined flour are also common and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan that is right for you. It will likely include exercise, a meal plan, blood sugar monitoring, and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes information in different languages! Call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 to get practical tips and information on managing diabetes in: Gujrati, Pakistani, Punjabi and Urdu. This information will tell you which of your favourite traditional foods fit into a healthy diet and which should be limited to help you manage diabetes. Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of North Indian and Pakistani descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with North Indian and Pakistani heritage. If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hour Continue reading >>

Healthy Carbohydrates For Diabetes Adapted For South Asian Diets

Healthy Carbohydrates For Diabetes Adapted For South Asian Diets

Choosing Carbohydrates Wisely A healthy diet for diabetes includes the right balance of carbohydrate, protein, and fat. Since glucose (sugar) comes mainly from carbohydrate in foods, it's important to learn which foods contain carbohydrate and what amount you should eat at each meal and snack. Having too much carbohydrate at one time can cause your blood glucose to go too high. Not having enough can cause you to have low energy and possibly low blood glucose levels. To find out the amount of carbohydrate that's right for you, ask your health care provider for a referral to your local Diabetes Health Centre to meet with a dietitian. In the meantime, most people find the following amounts a safe place to start: Men: 60-75 g carbohydrate per meal and 15-30 g carbohydrate per snack. Women: 45-60 g carbohydrate per meal and 15-30 g carbohydrate per snack. Based on the carbohydrate amounts listed above, use Table 1 to help you pick the foods you enjoy. Each serving listed has 15 grams of carbohydrate. Therefore, if you are aiming for 60 grams of carbohydrate at a meal, you can choose four servings of foods with carbohydrate. Try to pick a variety of foods rather than four servings of one food. Table 1: Foods that have carbohydrates and will have an effect on your blood glucose. Food Groups One Serving (15 g carbohydrates) Grains * Dried beans, peas and lentils officially belong with "Meat and Alternatives" but are listed here to show that they also contain carbohydrate. 1 6" roti (made from 1/5 cup of whole wheat flour) ¼ 12" naan bread ½ of 6" makki ki roti (corn roti) 75 mL (1/3 cup) cooked rice (choose brown or wild rice) 125 mL (½ cup) cereal (choose ones with at least 4 grams of fibre per serving) 125 mL (½ cup) cooked daal or beans such as cholay, rajmah* 125 mL (½ Continue reading >>

Flour Power: The Perfect Recipe For Diabetes-friendly Flour (atta)

Flour Power: The Perfect Recipe For Diabetes-friendly Flour (atta)

Home Magazine Diabetes Flour Power: The Perfect Recipe For Diabetes-Friendly Flour (Atta) Flour Power: The Perfect Recipe For Diabetes-Friendly Flour (Atta) Expert-reviewed by Ashwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience. Fact-checked by Aditya Nar, B.Pharm, MSc. Public Health and Health Economics. In diabetes, you indeed are what you eat. This is all the more critical when it comes to choosing to right kind of atta (or flour). As with everything else they eat, diabetics must choose a flour that can be digested slowly, is high in fibre, low in carbs and calories to maintain blood sugar levels. Considering all this topped with the wide variety of diabetes-friendly attas (flours) available in the market today one might think it is easier never to eat anything made with flour again! But wait, help is at hand! Because today, we have the full scoop for you on which varieties and types of flours are best suited for people with diabetes. The perfect recipe for diabetes-friendly flour According to Jyoti Sawant, Dietitian at Delhi-based Obino, The best flour for people with diabetes would be to eat standalone or a good mix of multigrain flour. Mix whole grains, such as finger millets (ragi or nachni), millets (bajra), barley (jau), soya beans, sorghum (jowar), amaranth grains (ramdana/rajgira), and chickpea flour (Bengal gram or kabuli chana) and your perfect diabetes-friendly flour is ready. All of these ingredients have a rich nutritional profile and are high in dietary fibre with complex carbohydrate content. Making multigrain flour an excellent choice for controlling blood sugar spikes and managing weight. How to make diabetes-friendly flour at home Indian bread, chapati, phulkaor rotiis a dish which is made in almost in Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

How Much Does Chapati Increase Blood Sugar?

How Much Does Chapati Increase Blood Sugar?

Chapatis can keep your diabetes in check fact or myth? Well, it’s a myth. A nationwide study on dietary habits of Indians to understand why the country is plagued by diabetes found that high carbohydrate intake in diet is the reason behind blood sugar problem. High carbohydrate intake in diet is the reason behind blood sugar problem in Indian population. Dr Joshi further that this study neutralises the myth that only the south Indian population consumes high carbohydrates in their diet (rice, idli and so on). “We found the north Indian population have an equal percentage of carbohydrate intake in their diet. We think having chapati (wheat) can control blood sugar. It is a myth,” said Dr Joshi. According to the study, the carbohydrate per cent intake in the east region was 65, in west it was 60.9, north was 62.7, south is 62.3 and central is 67.2. “The national average of carbohydrate intake in Indians was found to be 64.1% which is above the upper limit of 60% than that recommended by the guidelines,” said Dr Joshi. While the study has underlined the fact that Indians consume high carbohydrate than the western population, the good news in the study is that diabetic people are aware that they have to restrict consumption of carbohydrates in their daily diet. Continue reading >>

Indian Food ! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Indian Food ! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Recently diagnosed T2 about a week back. The 1st test result was 22 ! following week was between 7 - 12. I've been reading up a lot and a bit confused about my food. Am an Indian student here in the UK so I need to make quite a bit of adjustments in my food. I've eaten white rice twice a day all my life, but have no problems ditching it. Well, I havent had rice for the last 10 days now. My question is if one can have wholemeal brown bread (Rowan Hill) Serving Size: 100 g, Calories: 217, Fat: 1.8g, Carbs: 37.4g, Protein: 9.6g I have 4 slices toasted along with a fried egg and some lettuce. Would this be ok ? I've read some conflicting info about chappatis/rotis. We used Wheat flour to make our chappatis and not the readymade ones, So is safe to eat that ? All along I was under the impression that Wheat Chappatis were the best alternative to rice. Wrong ? I havent been able to test for a couple of days since Ive run out of strips and they're expensive ! But I guess I will have to buy some and test out by eating different things and making a note of it. Any Indians out here ? ( only coz I wanted to get the feedback from people who eat Indian food daily ! i think its easier to manage BS levels by having English food, everything Indian looks too rich & carbs laden. confused & frustrated. I havent been able to test for a couple of days since Ive run out of strips and they're expensive ! But I guess I will have to buy some and test out by eating different things and making a not Continue reading >>

Beat Diabetes With A Wheat, Flour And Rice-free Diet

Beat Diabetes With A Wheat, Flour And Rice-free Diet

With India expected to be home to 80 percent of the world’s diabetic population by 2025, the buzzword is ‘low glycemic load foods’. The glycemic index or GI is a measure of the effects of carbohydrate on blood sugar level. Studies have proved that people who eat low-glycemic food over several years are less prone to type 2 diabetes and coronary heart diseases than those who love their morning platter of ‘parantha, poori and roti (Indian breads)’ – the high glycemic delights. ‘The meals should be kept free of flour, cornflakes, wheat and rice,’ Gaurav Sharma, a diabetologist, sports medicine and lifestyle doctor told. They can kill with excess starch and gluten allergy, the newest wheat allergen on the pantry shelf which can aggravate the condition of diabetics. ‘An ideal anti-diabetic breakfast, the most important meal of the day, should be a combination of eggs – fried, poached or scrambled in extra-virgin olive oil – accompanied by a tomato or mint dip followed by herbal or jasmine tea,’ he added. Eggs do not increase cholesterol; the popular perception of eggs as a potential source of cholesterol is a myth, said the doctor who has treated several top sportspersons including Kapil Dev. Sharma, who has been practising lifestyle medicine for the last two decades, has designed several anti-diabetes diet plans. ‘Every Indian family with or without a history of diabetes must use at least three different varieties of cooking oils rich in the essential Omega-3 fatty acids, which help production of natural insulin,’ the doctor said. ‘They can be olive oil, mustard oil, clarified butter, coconut oil or flaxseed oil,’ he added. Read more about causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. Breakfast is ideally followed by a light snack of Continue reading >>

Problem Controlling Hb1ac

Problem Controlling Hb1ac

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community i have benn diagnosed with type2 diabetes in 2005 . since then i have been trying to control it through diets and medicine but never been able to . its stressing me out , i have also seen a specialist but of no use. the highest was tested in start of 2006 and the latest was 9.1 that is couple of weeks back. i also have underactive thyroid for which i am taking levothroxine 100mcg everyday and the last results were satisfactory. also i am taking bezalipfibrate slow release for tryglycerides which also not coming down. can some body help me out. i am stressed because of all this . also i have been declined insurance so no mortgage for me Welcome to the forum,khalid.Can you tell us a bit about your diet? Also do you have a blood testing meter so that you can tell which foods are making your blood sugar(BS) go up a lot. thanks...yes i have a blood testing meter. Breakfast : Two toast(kingsmill white medium), boiled egg and a cup of tea(semi skimmed milk) generally had breakfast around 10'o clock. Dinner around 4'o Clock: white flour chapatis either vegetables or lentil curry Before Final meal : cup of tea with biscuits or bombay mix final Meal around 10'o clock: white Flour Chapatis and either Lamb Curry or chicken curry( i really eat hot but not oily). As i work from home i dont have to rush in the morning but i do feel really hungry around 6 and 7 in the morning. Also what is the best time to monitor the blood and also to take the medicine Oh dear,Khalid,you've stumped me!I know next to nothing on Indian cuisine!We usually suggest reducing the portions of anything containing,rice,bread ,potatoes and pasta.In your case though I don't know what to suggest Continue reading >>

Which Is Better For A Diabetic: Chapati Or Rice?

Which Is Better For A Diabetic: Chapati Or Rice?

Diabetics need to be especially careful of their dietary choices because they are unable to naturally control blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetics don’t produce enough insulin, which is needed to shuttle glucose from the bloodstream into cells. In contrast, type 2 diabetics produce enough insulin but their cells are resistant to its affect. Common Indian foods such as chapati and rice can be eaten by diabetics in moderation, but different varieties are better suited to diabetic diets because they have lower glycemic indexes. Consult your doctor about the importance of choosing foods with a low glycemic index. Video of the Day Carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables and grains are not metabolized into glucose at the same rate. Some are quickly digested, causing spikes in blood glucose and insulin release, while others are broken down more slowly, which impacts blood sugar and insulin levels to a much lesser degree. The glycemic index is a comparative measure of how quickly a carbohydrate is reduced into glucose. In general, foods with index values of 55 or less have low impact on blood sugar levels and are considered most appropriate for diabetics. Index values between 56 and 69 are considered to have a moderate impact on blood glucose and insulin, whereas values of 70 or greater represent significant impact. The glycemic index of rice depends on whether the grain is polished or not, whereas the index of chapati depends on the type of flour used. Rice for Diabetics Diabetics can safely eat all types of rice, although their portions should be moderated. In the production of brown rice, only the outermost hull is removed from the rice kernel. White rice is further milled, processed and polished, which reduces the nutritional value of the grain. In addition to containing Continue reading >>

Food To Absolutely Avoid!

Food To Absolutely Avoid!

Would love to know about things that are so high in carbohydrates that it spikes your BG with the smallest of portions. I will start with what i discovered today... JOWAR!!!! This is a kind of grain used to make bread/rotis in India. While two wheat chappatis spike my BG to 110-115 maximum, 1.5 jowar roti gave me a BG of 170- 2 hours post meal! I thought it was a wrong reading and rechecked. But the same. And then i googled. Apparently 1 chappati has 12g carb while 1 jowar roti has more than double the carbs. I should have known as this is the grain that farmers traditionally consume. I am sure they need a carb rich diet given the physical exertion they undergo everyday. In any case guys, please avoid. And please post stuff that soared your BG to ridiculous levels. So glad you mention this. Over here curry & roti is popular and a favourite. I like curry but the roti spikes are high as you've mentioned. Since we cant eat rice or bread with the curry either, its a problem unless you have a homemade substitute. I no longer cook or bake much and cant think of something else to buy to improvise with. Ive tried it with very little brown basmati rice. The spike is not too big, but its there nonetheless. So, like most things I enjoy eating, Ive just cut back or stopped eating it. So glad you mention this. Over here curry & roti is popular and a favourite. I like curry but the roti spikes are high as you've mentioned. Since we cant eat rice or bread with the curry either, its a problem unless you have a homemade substitute. I no longer cook or bake much and cant think of something else to buy to improvise with. Ive tried it with very little brown basmati rice. The spike is not too big, but its there nonetheless. So, like most things I enjoy eating, Ive just cut back or stopped Continue reading >>

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