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Can Diabetics Eat Refried Beans

Can I Count No Fat Refried Beans As A Complex Carb?

Can I Count No Fat Refried Beans As A Complex Carb?

Answered Jul 28, 2016 Author has 314 answers and 321.4k answer views Did you know the term complex carbohydrate was invented on the floor of the United States Senate in 1977? I find it fascinating that something resulting from politics, not food science, has come to be central to so many conversations about nutrition. The phrase was initially introduced without definition and helped Congress identify and delegate monies for food production subsidies, and only later became a part of federal nutrition policy. The truth is, there are hundreds of levels of complexity in carbohydrate molecules, and grouping them into simple and complex is really a bit of a misdirection. Think instead in terms of natural carbs, as in those from whole plants, and processed carbs, as in those coming from factory processed foods. Stick with natural carbs and reject processed carbs. So, depending on how your beans are made and what additional additives have been included, they may be healthy. Or not. Read your ingredient label carefully and choose wisely, or better yet, make your own at home. ;-) Continue reading >>

The Glycemic Index Of Refried Beans

The Glycemic Index Of Refried Beans

When choosing which carbohydrates to eat, two factors to consider are a food’s glycemic index and glycemic load. These metrics assess how quickly and how strongly your blood sugar rises after eating a particular food. Refried beans, prepared from cooked and mashed pinto or black beans, contribute significant protein and fiber to your diet. Plus, the low glycemic index and glycemic load of refried beans adds to their nutritional value. Video of the Day Glycemic Index and Load The glycemic index of a food compares its effect on your blood sugar level to that of pure glucose. Glycemic load relates to glycemic index, but it takes into account how much digestible carbohydrate a food contains. A food may have a high glycemic index, but, if very little sugar exists in a typical serving size, its glycemic load may be low. A glycemic index of 70 or above, compared to glucose at 100, designates a food with a high glycemic index. An index of 55 or below denotes a low-glycemic-index food. For glycemic load, a score of 20 or more is high while 10 or less is low. Both the glycemic index and glycemic load of refried beans are low. A half-cup serving of canned refried beans provides 6 g protein to your diet and only 108 calories. This amount of refried beans also offers 20 percent or more of your daily fiber, iron and manganese. According to the University of Sydney’s Glycemic Index Foundation, a 150 g serving of commercially available refried beans has a glycemic index of 38 and a glycemic load of 10, making them a healthy addition to your dietary plan. Eating foods that cause a rapid and significant elevation in your blood sugar may have detrimental effects on your health if you consume them regularly. A pattern of high-glycemic-index food intake is associated with an elevated ri Continue reading >>

Can Beans And Rice Work In Your Diabetes Diet?

Can Beans And Rice Work In Your Diabetes Diet?

THURSDAY, April 12, 2012 — White rice and anything made with white flour are big diabetes diet "don'ts." Multiple studies have shown that as you digest these "white" foods, your body essentially treats them like sugar, which can cause a blood-sugar spike in patients with the disease and also increase a person's risk for developing diabetes. (Rice consumption is one reason diabetes rates are high among Asian populations.) Beans, meanwhile, are a complex starch that's thought to be a healthy component to most diets. Beans are high in fiber and protein, and contain essential nutrients, such as iron, zinc, and folate, as well as a compound that can inhibit the blood's ability to absorb sugar. So when you combine the good and the bad, does it add up to a diabetes-friendly dish? That's the question researchers at the Oregon Health and Science University posed in their recent study published in Nutrition Journal as part of an effort to help tailor diabetes care to cultural groups. After examining the blood glucose levels of adults with type 2 diabetes who consumed either pinto beans and white, long grain rice, black beans and white, long grain rice, red kidney beans and white, long grain rice or white, long grain rice alone, researchers found that the pairing of any type of beans with rice can help stop unhealthy blood sugar spikes. In the trial, blood glucose levels were significantly lower for the three bean and rice groups compared to the rice-only group after 90, 120, and 150 minutes. Because beans and rice are a popular food combination in the Caribbean, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean, researchers believe this new finding can help people living with type 2 diabetes in those cultures adhere to a diet that will help them better manage their diabetes Continue reading >>

Are Refried Beans Healthy?

Are Refried Beans Healthy?

Mention the word “fried” and it immediately conjures images of artery-clogging saturated fat. “Refried beans" sound even more unhealthy, but they’re not. Even though they’re typically made using bacon fat, refried beans are surprisingly low in fat and they contain all the nutrients found in pinto beans, from dietary fiber and protein to iron and plant chemicals that protect you from diseases. Refried beans originated in Mexico where they’re called frijoles refritos, or “well-fried beans.” Basic refried beans are made from four simple ingredients: pinto beans, onion, garlic and bacon fat or lard. Cooks brown chopped onion and minced garlic in the fat and then add canned pinto beans to the skillet together with fluid from the can. As the beans heat up, they’re mashed with a fork or potato masher to create the desired consistency. Typical enhancements include chili powder, cumin, grated cheese or chopped jalapeno peppers. Nutrient Basics One cup of refried beans has 217 calories, 13 grams of protein and just 3 grams of total fat. If you buy fat-free refried beans, the total fat drops to just 1 gram. Refried beans are a good source of oxygen-carrying iron; men get 50 percent of the recommended daily intake and women get 22 percent based on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet. One serving gives you a healthy boost of antioxidant vitamin C and energy-providing B vitamins. As with most processed foods, if you buy canned refried beans they’ll be high in salt unless you choose a low-salt brand. Just 1 cup of traditional refried beans has 1,069 milligrams of sodium -- that’s 70 percent of the total daily value. Fiber Beans are among the best sources of soluble and insoluble fiber. One cup of traditional refried beans has 12 grams of dietary fiber, which is at least 3 Continue reading >>

Quick And Easy Refried Beans

Quick And Easy Refried Beans

3 out of 4 of my kid's liked these. We used them to make bean burrito's. By themselves they need something more to flavor but when paired with something (like in the burritos) they were ok. They... As I prepared this tonight I was thinking our enchiladas would end up served with just rice. I wasn't hopeful about them at all. First, I meant to add some bacon - and forgot. I figured this was... I prefer the taste of refried beans that use bacon grease or lard, but these aren't bad and are certainly healthier. I also added a couple of tablespoons of chopped onion with the garlic to giv... I followed the recipe exactly. I included the liquid from both cans of beans. The flavor was great. Only problem was that I did not mash up the beans all the way and my family thought they wer... I tried this recipe, minus the lime juice, no one in my family liked them. (they're spoiled, because I cook my own beans), but I was out of homemade beans, so I decided to try canned beans, big ... Just whipped this up and added paprika, red pepper flakes, taco sauce, garlic powder, pepper, and 2 tsp of ranch seasoning (gives it a sour cream tang) and it became an awesome dip for corn chip... I don't eat the ones in the can...they are nasty sooooooooo wasn't sure if I wanted to try this or not, but needed some type of veggie. My hubby and I thought they were delicious. I didn't dr... Very good! Was searching for a quick recipe after I found I was out of canned refried beans. I halved the recipe, and DID use the liquid from the can (I used black beans, which were great). Ther... First time I made this I drained the beans. Second time, did not drain, liked them much better. Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

Refried Beans - Friend Or Foe?

Refried Beans - Friend Or Foe?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I'm going to a mexian restaurant tomorrow night. They have plenty of chicken & cheese type meals I can eat with no problem. (skipping the chips and torillas.) Alomst every side dish is rice and refried beans. I couldn't find a Glycemic index rating on them. I see they are high carb but also high fiber. I know, I know... some will say they are fine and some will say they are the devil. But for you low-carb types that easily skyrocket... are they too much? I'm wondering if I should chance it at least once and chalk it up to a learning experience when my GL jumps to 1,000,000. But if most can't handle it, I won't even try. I would have posted this elsewhere but I wanted to keep the majority of insulin users out of it since I don't use it. Some info on refried beans from this site: What is the glycemic index? Michael R. Eades, M.D. "...If we tried the same experiment with refried beans (like those you would find in Mexican food), we would find that the area under the blood glucose curve caused by the 50 grams of carbohydrate from the refried beans would be only about 40% of that caused by the pure glucose. We would say that the refried beans have a glycemic index of 40." Just eat 'em, I'd say. It's not like you're going to eat them as a staple of your diet, so enjoy your night out! IMHO, of course... I regularly eat refried beans...both at home and in the mexican restaurants. I think the key is moderation...I usually don't finish the large serving they put on the plate and I usually don't have any problems with them. The last time we had mexican, I got chicken fajitas, ate only 1 tortilla and had Continue reading >>

Eat Beans For Better Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Eat Beans For Better Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Beans sometimes get a bum rap. Truth be told, beans boast an amazing number of health benefits. If you have diabetes, beans, and other legumes can help you maintain better control of your blood sugar. What's a legume, you ask? A legume is a plant whose seeds or fruit are found in a long case, called a pod. Beans, chickpeas and lentils are common legumes. Legumes are a low glycemic index food that won't cause sudden spikes in your blood sugar. The glycemic index looks at how fast a carbohydrate-containing food, like beans, raises your blood sugar (glucose) level compared to a baseline product like white bread. Foods low on the index breakdown slowly in the body, so you don't get a sudden rush of sugar into your bloodstream. High glycemic foods (like white rice), on the other hand, get digested more quickly, which can send your blood sugar soaring. Diabetes Superfood Many diabetes nutrition guidelines recommend beans and legumes as part of a healthy diet. In fact, the American Diabetes Association includes them in their list of Diabetes Superfoods. Here's why beans and legumes are so good for you: They provide slowly digested starch (carbohydrate), which reduces blood sugar spikes. They are full of healthy fiber, so they keep you feeling full longer. They're packed with protein, which your body needs to work properly. They are low in fat. Studies show that adding 1 cup (190 grams) of legumes to your daily diet helps lower hemoglobin A1C levels. (That's your average blood sugar level for the last 2-3 months.) Some research hints that eating legumes at breakfast prevents spikes after that meal and subsequent ones that day. And legumes are also good for your heart. A daily dose of beans and legumes can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and coronary ar Continue reading >>

Mexican Anyone? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Mexican Anyone? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

So I've been craving Mexican food really bad. To the point that I dream about it and can taste it in my dreams. Has anyone had Mexican? What did you have and what were your numbers? Love Mexican!! I had a taco salad with shredded chicken pico salsa sour cream and rice and my number after was awesome! Right around 100 after two hours. I also had a couple chips with salsa:) oh and lots of cheese and avocado!! I'm Mexican, and cook Mexican food like 85% of the time. Yesterday I made flautas with chicken ate 4 and number was pretty high. Pretty sure it was the tortilla, so my fault but it's just so hard not to eat Mexican food. I have! I struggle with homemade tacos in the shells but when we go out I can have chips and salsa as well as enchilada suizas and be well within limits. Sides of beans and rice (not all) included. When I do eat Mexican food, I stick with small portion like 1 or 2 beef flauta make sure it's corn tortillas and not flour. Or 1 tostada, or one small Street taco. I've had success with tamales but tortillas, rice, and black beans all cause spikes. I'm pretty limited which makes me very sad. Didn't go well for me. I ordered chicken fajitas had two. Corn tortillas of course. Walked almost 2 hours. I scored a 129 and I've never gone over before ;(;(;( I do great with Mexican food. I typically skip the rice or have a very small portion and have some sort of plate with meat, beans, veggies, guacamole, salsa. Corn tortillas or tortilla chips don't spike my numbers but flour tortillas are out. Some people can't do beans but I can do a moderate portion with no problem. I just change up what I put the tacos in. I use 100% whole wheat tortillas and I get the med/small ones so it feels like I can have more ;) I love Mexican!!! I just can't eat anything corn based o Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Beans | Prevention

Health Benefits Of Beans | Prevention

If I could eat only one food for the rest of my life, it would definitely be beans. I love the way they taste, but they also fill me up for hours. Plus, they make me feel like a health champion. That's because beans have such an amazing nutrition track record. Bean eaters are associated with smaller waist sizes and a 22% lower risk of obesity. They also take in less "bad" fat and one-third more fiber than those who avoid these nutritional gems. Health benefits of beans. One cup of beans provides a whopping 13 g of fiberwhich is half of what we need dailywith no saturated fat. Beans are loaded with protein (about 15 g per cup) and dozens of key nutrients, including a few most women fall short oncalcium, potassium, and magnesium. Studies also tie beans to a reduced risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure , and breast and colon cancers. And surprisingly, red, pinto, and kidney beans are the highest antioxidant food, beating out both blueberries and cranberries. We've all heard the funny songs, but nutritionally speaking, beans are no joke. The latest Dietary Guidelines advise eating 3 cups every week, and the canned varieties do count! Keep bloating (and embarrassing gas) to a minimum by popping a Beano supplement before you eat or sipping peppermint tea after. Here, my bean shopping tips: You may have heard that bagged beans are best, but they need to be soaked and then boiled for hours before they're ready to eat. Who has the time or patience for that? Bagged beans are generally less expensive (about $1 per 16-ounce bag versus $1.50 for a 15-ounce can) and have no added ingredients, including salt. But canned varieties, which are ready to eat, can be just as nutritious. Canned low-sodium beans are exactly the same price, with two-thirds less sodium . Continue reading >>

Are Refried Beans Healthy

Are Refried Beans Healthy

Refried beans are mashed beans that are heated in oil and seasoned with salt and spices. The beans are used as a filling for tacos and burritos in many Mexican and Spanish recipes. With just 2.78 grams of fat per 1-cup serving, refried beans are a low-fat way to add flavor to recipes, and they also contain healthy doses of certain minerals. Refried beans do come with certain nutritional drawbacks that make them an occasional part of your diet rather than an everyday staple. All beans are a healthy source of dietary fiber, and refried beans are no exception. Getting plenty of fiber in your diet enables your digestive system to work efficiently, which decreases your risk of developing constipation. A high-fiber diet might also cut your risk of heart disease and diabetes. Getting plenty of fiber in your diet might help lower your cholesterol and regulate healthy blood sugar levels as well. One cup of refried beans contains 12.1 of the 21 to 38 grams of fiber you should eat each day. The primary drawback to refried beans is the large amount of sodium in each serving. The average person consumes 3,400 milligrams of sodium on a daily basis. This is quite a bit more than the recommended 1,500 to 2,300 milligrams you should limit yourself to each day. Too much sodium on a regular basis can elevate your blood pressure and increase your risk of kidney problems, cardiovascular disease and stroke, MayoClinic.com reports. One cup of refried beans contains 1,069 milligrams of sodium. One cup of refried beans contains 3.97 milligrams of iron, which is a good portion of the 8 to 18 milligrams your body needs on a daily basis. Iron enables your body to make red blood cells. It also helps move oxygen through your body efficiently. The same serving of refried beans also supplies you with Continue reading >>

How To Eat Healthy At A Mexican Restaurant|reader's Digest

How To Eat Healthy At A Mexican Restaurant|reader's Digest

The chips on the table; the margaritas; the mounds of refried beans and rice. This is one cuisine where overdoing it seems unavoidable. But you can also find pinto and black beans that havent been refried, fajitas with grilled bell peppers and onions, and fish steamed and slathered in fresh tomatilla sauce. The trick is all in the ordering. Avoid anything with flour tortillas. These carb bombs can deliver nearly a meals worth of calories on their own, and theyre made of refined white flour. The refried beans are often loaded with lard and, as the name implies, theyre fried. Cheese is another area where most restaurants go crazy: You can get a 1/2-pound of it shredded over most dishes or stuffed into enchiladas and rellenos. Chimichangasdeep-fried burritosare obviously a bad choice. And watch out for salads that come in deep-fried tortilla bowls, which can contain about 400 calories in the bowl alone. (If you can limit yourself to the greens inside, fine.) The biggest trap at Mexican restaurants is the portion sizes . Try ordering la carte, (minus the riceusually friedand beansrefried or cooked with loads of salt and fat) and definitely plan to split the meal, either with your dining companion or to take home for another meal. 1. Ask that the chips not be brought to the table. But keep the salsaits loaded with antioxidants and the vinegar and tomatoes can offer help in controlling blood sugar. Use it as a healthy way to spice up anything on your plate. 2. For appetizers, consider cevichechopped up raw fish marinated in lime, cilantro, and other spicesor gazpachospicy vegetable soup served cool. 3. Guacamole is full of healthy fats, but also calories. Lighten the load by eating it with soft corn tortillasthese are loaded with fiber and are a good substitute for deep-frie Continue reading >>

Beans Will Rock Your World

Beans Will Rock Your World

I’ve started eating a lot more beans. Why? They are healthy and cheap. They make me feel good, and it turns out they taste great if you prepare them right. Research shows that beans are even better if you have diabetes. A woman in my neighborhood got me started. We were talking about diabetes, and she said she had been diagnosed with Type 2 five years ago. But she now eats beans with every meal, and all her numbers are back to normal, including her glucose tolerance test. I figured I should look into it. Of course the first place to look is always Diabetes Self-Management‘s Amy Campbell. Here’s what she wrote in 2007: “Beans are a rich source of protein. One cup of beans contains about 16 grams of protein, the same as 2 ounces of meat or chicken. People who are vegetarians typically use beans and bean products as their main source of protein. Beans contain no cholesterol…and only about 1 gram of fat (non of it saturated, either).” That’s just the start. Amy says beans “also contains about 15 grams of [mostly-soluble] fiber…which can help lower cholesterol levels and lower the risk of heart disease…Beans are also a great source of iron, calcium, potassium, and magnesium, as well as vitamin A and folate.” That column was from five years ago. Since then, others have been shouting the praises of beans even more loudly. According to Jim Healthy, editor of the Web site My Healing Kitchen, “Beans are best for diabetes,” because “they are loaded with all-important fiber, which slows the breakdown of carbohydrates into sugars in your bloodstream, assists your body’s insulin response to glucose, and helps you burn fat faster.” They will limit the spikes in glucose levels after meals. (See last week’s blog entry “Stop Spiking Those Sugars!”) H Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Beans

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Beans

Beans are a diabetes super food. The American Diabetes Association advises people with diabetes to add dried beans or no-sodium canned beans to several meals each week. They are low on the glycemic index and can help manage blood sugar levels better than many other starchy foods. Beans also contain protein and fiber, making them a healthy two-for-one nutritional component to every meal. With so many types of beans available, there is bound to be one that suits your palette. Learn more about understanding the glycemic index here. Benefits of beans When planning your meals, remember that 1/3 cup of cooked beans is considered one starch diabetic exchange. One diabetic exchange of beans provides about 80 calories and about 15 grams of carbohydrates. If using the beans as a replacement for animal protein, the serving size or diabetic exchange is 1/2 cup. For every half-cup of beans, make sure to account for one very lean protein exchange and one starch exchange. The nutritional information for beans varies slightly from bean to bean. Here’s the nutritional information, 1/3 cup each, for some beans you may want to try: Type Black beans Lima beans Red kidney beans Calories 75 60 73 Protein (g) 5 3 5 Carbohydrates (g) 13 11 12 Fiber (g) 5 3 4 Beans are a good alternative to meat because of their high protein content. Unlike meat, beans have no saturated fat and ample fiber, which makes them a healthy exchange. When looking at exchange lists, beans are usually grouped with starches such as breads and potatoes. But remember that beans tend to be much higher in protein and fiber than other starchy foods. Beans also provide significant soluble fiber, which feeds healthy gut bacteria and results in improved gut health and reduced insulin resistance in animal studies. More research Continue reading >>

Paleo Refried Beans

Paleo Refried Beans

Paleo Refried Beans RE-FRIED BEANS What is Paleo refried beans? Well keep reading, and some great recipes…first some facts. Most of you know re-fried beans are traditionally made with pinto beans. My program doesn’t allow beans. Sure, they seem harmless…no corn syrup, no trans-fats, no “plastic package” surrounding this food item…so what’s wrong with eating beans? Well, first off, let’s check the ingredients in traditional re-fried beans = Prepared Dry Beans, Water, Salt, Lard (Partially Hydrogenated Lard With BHA And BHT Added To Help Protect Flavor), Onion Powder, Chili Pepper, Garlic Powder, Spice. Hydrogentated oils!!! Trans-fats = bad bad bad! Beans also are very high in carbs. Sure they have protein, but with a 4:1 ratio of carbs to protein, it is considered a carb in the nutrition books. I don’t believe beans have caused people to have a damaged metabolism, BUT since the typical American diet is filled with carbs and sugar, most people end up sensitive to carbs. Once that happens, things like beans have too much starch. Beans, as well as grains, contain lectins, which are indigestible proteins found in plants that attach themselves to the lower intestine, causing a really unpleasant inflammatory response and a cascade of bowel issues. This is when people suffer from Crohn’s, colitis, IBS, and other auto-immune disorders. These lectins also increase the risk of leptin resistance (which I write a whole chapter on in Secrets to a Healthy Metabolism). Leptin is the hormone that signals that we are full, which can malfunction causing over-eating. This is why I suggest a grain-free, bean-free diet. My passion is to make this limited diet as tasty as possible so you can stay successful! Here is a recipe that you will totally enjoy that is low in star Continue reading >>

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