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Can Diabetics Eat Protein?

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Protein And Diabetes

Protein And Diabetes

Tweet Protein is one of the three main energy providing macronutrients, along with carbohydrate and fat. It helps the body to grow new tissue, therefore helping to build muscle and repair damage to the body. Protein is also a constituent part of each cell of our bodies and makes up approximately a sixth of our body weight. Protein and blood glucose In addition to helping the body grow, protein can also be broken down by the body into glucose and used for energy (a process known as gluconeogenesis). Protein can be broken down into glucose by the body and the effects are more likely to be noticed if you are having meals with less carbohydrate. Protein is broken down into glucose less efficiently than carbohydrate and, as a result, any effects of protein on blood glucose levels tend to occur any where between a few hours and several hours after eating. People with type 1 diabetes, or type 2 diabetes on insulin, may need to bear the effects of protein in mind if having a largely protein based meal. It’s best to learn how your sugar levels react to such meals so that you can judge the right insulin requirements. How much protein should I be eating? The UK Food Standards Agency has a sliding scale for recommended protein intake, varying by age: 1 to 3 years: 15g 4 to 6 years: 20g 7 to 10 years: 28g 11 to 14 years: 42g 15 to 18 years: 55g 19 to 50 years: 55g Over 50 years: 53g Some diets, such as the Zone diet, advocate eating an amount of protein in proportion to your lean body mass (body weight minus body fat). Can protein be bad for you? A number of studies have found there to be correlations between intake of red meat and the development of type 2 diabetes and cancers (including lung cancer liver cancer and notably bowel cancer). The studies found that if people were con Continue reading >>

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

A new clinical study suggests that diets high in protein, independent of caloric intake, improve metabolic health. High-protein diets in type 2 diabetes patients are controversial. Such diets have been linked to increased risk of heart disease and certain cancers. However, these diets have also been praised because they result in less carbohydrate intake and weight loss. A clinical study conducted by researchers in Germany studied the effects of two high-protein diets on patients. The diets were isocaloric, with the only difference being the source of protein: animal or plant (pulses). The study included 30 type 2 diabetes patients. The average age of participants was 65 years, the average BMI was 30.5, and average HbA1c was 7.0%. Both diets were 30% protein, 40% carbohydrates, and 30% fat. Length of the trial was 6 weeks. The study authors analyzed different metabolic and molecular parameters before and after the diet. Both subject groups saw an improvement in liver health with reductions AST, ALT, and GGT. The fat content of the liver and Hba1c levels also improved in all subjects. The animal protein diet reduced liver fat content by 43.6% whereas the plant diet reduced liver fat content by 37.1% (p < 0.001). Hba1c levels were reduced by 0.58% in the animal protein diet group and 0.41% in the plant diet group (p < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity, derived from hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, improved significantly only in the animal protein diet group with a change of 0.88 mg/kg BW/min (p < 0.05). The plant protein diet group saw an improvement in kidney function, which was not found in the animal protein diet group. The serum creatinine reduction was 7.79 micromols per liter (p < 0.01). Glomerular filtration rate also improved in the plant protein diet group. This fin Continue reading >>

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

Protein shakes and smoothies are all the rage these days. These popular pre- and post-workout drinks can include almost any ingredient under the sun, so if you have diabetes, it’s natural to wonder how they’ll affect your blood sugar. That said, there’s no reason to shy away from these drinks. There are countless diabetes-friendly recipes available online. Here, we round up our top eight protein shake and smoothie recipes for people with diabetes. Protein drinks 101 In general, protein drinks are made from protein powder and a liquid. Depending on your dietary needs, this liquid may be: water dairy milk nut milk rice milk seed milk Other protein add-ins include: cottage cheese yogurt nut butters raw nuts Sweeteners, fresh or frozen fruit, and fresh vegetables may also be added. No one food is off-limits if you have diabetes. Still, it’s important to limit refined carbohydrates that are more likely to spike your blood sugar. Eating fat with carbohydrates may help slow digestion. This can slow down the length of time it takes sugar to hit your bloodstream. Sources of fat that taste great in protein drinks include: nut butters raw nuts hemp seeds flaxseeds chia seeds avocados If possible, add fiber to your protein drink. It helps slow your body’s absorption of sugar. Oatmeal, ground flaxseed, chia seeds, and wheat bran are high in fiber and are protein-drink friendly. Some protein drink recipes call for maple syrup or Stevia. Maple syrup is high in sugar, but can be enjoyed sparingly. Stevia is a non-nutritive, no-calorie sweetener that won’t raise your blood sugar. When making shakes and smoothies, use the least amount of sweetener possible. Many pre-made protein shakes and smoothies are loaded with refined sugar. Your best bet is to make them at home where yo Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Whey protein is one of the two major proteins found in milk and dairy products. The other major protein in dairy products is casein—many people have sensitivities to casein, but few people seem to have any sensitivity to whey protein. When rennin, a protein that curdles milk, is added to milk and other dairy products, the curds (casein) and whey separate, just as they did in the old nursery rhyme. Whey protein is used for a number of purposes—it is used to maintain daily protein intakes, to build muscle mass, and to increase fat loss. Whey isn’t the only protein to increase fat loss—most proteins do, but most proteins aren’t available in an easily dissolved powder as whey is. Whey Protein, Insulin and Blood Sugar There are a number of properties of whey protein that appear to be useful in diabetes. [1] Whey protein is a good source of the amino acid L-cysteine. L-cysteine is used to synthesize glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidant. Oxidative stress—the buildup of damaging free radicals—is thought to be one of the underlying causes of insulin resistance and to be responsible for some of the complications of diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and kidney damage. Whey protein, when added to a meal, also appears to increase insulin secretion and to decrease blood sugar after a meal. (Post-prandial blood glucose)[2] Whey protein can also decrease triglyceride levels in diabetics after meals. In a recent study, blood sugar levels were 28% lower in those who had whey protein along with their meal. Insulin levels were increased (doubled) and, importantly, the insulin response lasted longer. The study was small, only examining the responses of 15 individuals, but the design of the study made the results significant.[3] Whey has Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should a Person With Diabetes Eat? Protein itself does not have much of an effect on blood sugar levels, though the food the protein is in may. Typically, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes. There are, however, times when less protein isbetter. Protein is one of three essential macronutrients; the other twoare fat and carbohydrate. These are needed in large amounts to maintain health and vital functions. The body uses protein to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function and they help some additional physiological processes. As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 to 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein. This is the same amount suggested for a balanced non-diabetic diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. It would be more accurate, however, to use the standard formula of 0.8 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. To do the kilogram conversion, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2. For instance, if you weigh 150 pounds, that is equal to 68 kilograms. Divide that by 0.8 and you get a protein goal of 85 grams. According to the USDA Dietary Guidelines , it is recommended to eat 5 1/2 ounces of protein-rich food each day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein When choosing proteins for a diabetic diet, the concern is more with the fats and carbohydrates that these foods Continue reading >>

Understanding Protein

Understanding Protein

Excess protein can mean excess calories and fat. It's best to get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry, fish, low-fat dairy products, and tofu. Protein is an essential part of your diet — and your body. But too much of a good thing can be bad for you. Most meats have fat as well as protein. So excess protein from animal sources can mean excess calories and fat — which means a greater chance at gaining weight. Proteins are found in: Poultry Fish and shellfish Eggs Dairy products, like cottage cheese and regular cheese Plant-based proteins, like beans, nuts and tofu The best advice about protein? Get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry and fish, low fat or nonfat dairy products, and vegetarian protein sources like tofu. How much protein do I need each day? For most people with diabetes, the amount of protein you need is the same as for people without diabetes. The National Institutes of Medicine recommend protein should typically provide 10-35% of total calories. The average intake for adults in the U.S. and Canada is about 15% of total calories. For most people, this amounts to 6 to 8 ounces of lean meat, poultry or fish daily. Think of a 3-ounce portion of protein as the size of a deck of playing cards. Aim for including roughly two of these in your diet daily. If you have kidney problems, you may need to limit how much protein you eat. Excess protein can make kidney damage worse. Your registered dietitian can help select the amount of protein that is right for you. Are All Proteins Created Equal? The source of protein is something else to consider – because some proteins are higher in calories and fats than others. Saturated fats and cholesterol are found in many protein-rich foods, contributing to bl Continue reading >>

Eat More Protein At Breakfast To Prevent After-meal Blood Sugar Spikes

Eat More Protein At Breakfast To Prevent After-meal Blood Sugar Spikes

After-meal blood sugar spikes can be a significant issue for people who have diabetes, but new research from the University of Missouri suggests that increasing protein consumption at breakfast can help prevent these spikes in those with Type 2 diabetes. Roughly 29 million people in the United States are living with Type 2. Earlier research has shown that the blood sugar response after one meal is affected by what was eaten in the previous meal, an occurrence known as the “second-meal phenomenon.” To determine the impact of a high-protein versus a high-carbohydrate breakfast on the blood sugar response after both breakfast and lunch in people with Type 2 diabetes, investigators recruited 12 men and women with the condition. For seven days, the participants ate either a 500-calorie breakfast meal consisting of 35% protein and 45% carbohydrate, or a 500-calorie breakfast meal consisting of 15% protein and 65% carbohydrate. On the seventh day, the breakfast meal was followed by a standard 500-calorie lunch 4 hours later, and blood samples were taken throughout the day to assess the subjects’ levels of glucose, insulin, and several gut hormones that help regulate the insulin response. The researchers found that the high-protein breakfast lowered blood glucose levels after both breakfast and lunch and that insulin levels were slightly elevated after lunch, indicating that the participants’ bodies were working properly to manage blood sugar. Although increasing protein intake at breakfast is helpful for managing after-meal blood glucose, the researchers note that it is not necessary to consume excessive amounts of the nutrient. They recommend eating 25 to 30 grams of protein at breakfast, which is within the Food and Drug Administration’s recommended range of 50 gra Continue reading >>

Why Do Diabetics Need To Eat Protein With Carbs?

Why Do Diabetics Need To Eat Protein With Carbs?

People without diabetes do not have to worry about their blood sugar levels because their bodies are able to compensate for whatever amount of carbohydrates they eat by secreting the appropriate amount of insulin. If you have diabetes, you have to operate in manual mode and eat in a way that will make it easier for your body to keep your blood sugar levels within the desirable range. Eating a controlled amount of carbohydrates and combining your carbs with a source of protein at each of your meals and snacks can help you optimize your diabetes control. Video of the Day To prevent suffering from the complications associated with uncontrolled diabetes and high blood sugar levels, you need to maintain your blood sugar levels between 70 and 130 mg/dL before eating and below 180 mg/dL two hours after your meal. Eating carbohydrates causes your blood sugar levels to rise, while protein does not significantly impact your blood sugar. Eating too many carbohydrates or eating carbohydrates that are quickly digested can result in high blood sugar levels and compromise your health and longevity. Protein is the most satiating of all nutrients, according to the May 2008 issue of the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," and including a source of protein at each of your meals and snacks in your diabetic meal plan can help you eat fewer carbohydrates and better control your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes and need to lose weight, combining your carbs with a protein can help you feel more satisfied and lose weight without feeling hungry. Losing excess weight, if needed, can greatly reduce your insulin resistance and make it easier for you to keep your diabetes under control. Eating a meal or a snack that is almost exclusively composed of carbohydrates can make your blood su Continue reading >>

Protein: The Missing Piece To The Diabetes Puzzle

Protein: The Missing Piece To The Diabetes Puzzle

Protein: The Missing Piece to the Diabetes Puzzle This information pertains to those with any type of diabetes. If you take insulin for diabetes, you might have heard that you can eat protein-rich foods and not need insulin to cover them. Also, if you have type 2 diabetes and do not use insulin, you may find that eating protein raises your blood sugar. Learning how to manage your blood sugar levels while getting adequate protein is important because protein intake is non-negotiable. As the US Department of Health and Human Services states, every cell in your body contains protein and is an essential part of your diet, as it is needed for cellular repair and division. Protein is also vital for growth and development in children, teens, as well as pregnant women. In this post, well explain how protein raises blood sugar, stimulates the production of insulin (or raises the need for insulin intake), and share tips on how to manage dietary protein if you have diabetes. WHY Do Blood Sugars Rise After Eating Protein? The molecular structure of the amino acid arginine. (Image Credit: Shutterstock) Proteins are composed of amino acid building blocks and are regarded as the workhorses of the cell. They serve numerous vital cellular functions, ranging from DNA replication to glucose metabolism. They stimulate the secretion of insulin and glucagon . Insulin lowers blood sugar and glucagon raises it. These two hormones work together in those without diabetes to keep their blood sugars tightly controlled at all times. In those with diabetes, glucagon is secreted but insulin isnt (or its insufficient) and this causes blood sugar to rise. Besides regulating our blood sugar levels, its important to know that insulin is required to build and maintain muscle. We know that body builders w Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Diabetes SpectrumVolume 13 Number 3, 2000, Page 132 Marion J. Franz, MS, RD, LD, CDE In Brief People with diabetes are frequently given advice about protein that has no scientific basis. In addition, although weight is lost when individuals follow a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, there is no evidence that such diets are followed long-term or that there is less recidivism than with other low-calorie diets. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are in poor metabolic control may have increased protein requirements. However, the usual amount of protein consumed by people with diabetes adequately compensates for the increased protein catabolism. People with diabetes need adequate and accurate information about protein on which to base their food decisions. In the United States, ~16% of the average adult consumption of calories is from protein, and this has varied little from 1909 to the present.1 Protein intake is also fairly consistent across all ages from infancy to older age. A daily intake of 2,500 calories contributes ~100 g of protein—about twice what is needed to replace protein lost on a daily basis. Excess amino acids must be converted into other storage products or oxidized as fuel. Therefore, in theory, the excess ingested protein could, through the process of gluconeogenesis, produce glucose. This would mean that 100 g of protein could produce ~50 g of glucose. This has been the basis of the statement that if about half of ingested protein is converted to glucose, protein will have one-half the effect of carbohydrate on blood glucose levels. However, this belief has been challenged.2-4 Protein controversies exist either because research has not provided conclusive answers or because professionals are not aware of the research. This article will review Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning. "Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high." Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says. Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast. However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with type 2 diabetes. Here are some other breakfast mistakes to avoid: Don’t fly on a sugar high. If you don't have a lot of time in the morning for healthy breakfast foods, you may be tempted to wolf do Continue reading >>

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