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Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes And Rice?

Is White Rice Good Or Bad For You?

Is White Rice Good Or Bad For You?

Rice, classified as a cereal grain like wheat, oats and corn, serves as a staple food for nearly half of the world’s population, according to The Cambridge World History of Food. Natural rice grains consist of the endosperm, germ and bran. White rice, called milled or polished rice, requires removal of the outer layers leaving only the endosperm. Although white rice serves as a superior source of energy and protein among the cereal grains and provides nutrients that are good for you, there are other more nutrient-dense food sources. Energy and Protein There are several different types of rice classified based on the length of the grain in relation to the width. Long-grain rice is popular for its fluffy texture when cooked and short-grain rice, sometimes called sushi rice, cooks very sticky. The choice is a personal preference, but each one shares a similar energy and protein profile. A 1-cup serving of long-grain white rice contains 205 calories and 4.25 grams of protein, according to the USDA National Nutrient Database. Based on a 2,000-calorie diet, it provides 10 percent of your daily calories. Nutrients White rice is naturally cholesterol free, low fat and low sodium – all characteristics of a food that is good for you. However, removing the outer layers from the rice endosperm also removes many of the nutrients. To counteract this effect, manufacturers enrich the white rice with nutrients. A 1-cup serving of long-grain white rice contains 1.9 milligrams of iron, 68 milligrams of phosphorus, 55 milligrams of potassium, 19 milligrams of magnesium, .77 milligrams of zinc and 16 milligrams of calcium. The same serving provides 153 micrograms of folate, 2.3 milligrams of niacin, .26 milligrams of thiamine and .15 milligrams of vitamin B-6. Nutrient Density The USDA Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

These ten diabetic foods to avoid are your enemies if you are trying to control blood sugar. That is because of insulin resistance in a type 2 diabetic and the insulin impairment in a type 1 diabetic. The foods listed here cause huge spikes in insulin, so your pancreas has to respond quickly. But diabetics have impaired insulin response. We need to stay away from those foods that are easily digested and release glucose in a flood. Of course, table sugar causes a blood sugar spike. Sugar in all its forms tops the list of diabetic foods to avoid. All type 1 and type 2 diabetic have been told this. The problem lies in the other things, foods that act like sugar when they hit our stomach and start being digested. Here are the ten worst of them. White pasta is made from refined flour, one of a diabetic's worst enemies. That makes it one of the top diabetic foods to avoid. White flour has every bit of fiber and vitamins stripped away, leaving only simple carbohydrate, which is one step away from simple sugar. It is in nearly all processed foods in some form, and in your digestive system it becomes pure glucose very fast. White rice has been polished, a refining process that removes the outer parts where fiber and vitamins are found. All that is left is the endosperm, which is also a simple carbohydrate. Like white flour it turns to glucose very fast. Blood sugar spikes, insulin is pumped out to meet it, and very soon you have a sugar low and feel hungry again. If you are fighting obesity and diabetes, white rice and white pasta are bound to make your battle harder. Does that mean no pasta or rice in your diet? No, it means you look for alternatives. Two great ones are brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Both are available at your grocery store next to the white versions. They a Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions About Diabetes

Frequently Asked Questions About Diabetes

1. Why do you recommend a vegan diet for diabetes? Vegan diets, which contain no animal products (meat, dairy, eggs, or other animal products), are healthier than other diets, because they contain no cholesterol and less fat, saturated fat, and calories than meat-based diets or ovo-lacto vegetarian diets. Scientific research shows that health benefits increase as the amount of food from animal sources in the diet decreases, making vegan diets the most healthful overall. 2. I want to try a vegan diet. How should I start? If a plant-based diet is new to you, you’ll be pleased to discover a wonderful additional benefit to vegan eating: It’s a fun way to explore delicious new foods. Start by checking out our Vegan Diet: How-to Guide for Diabetes and our Vegetarian Starter Kit, both of which explain the New Four Food Groups and offer useful tips, the “whys” and “hows” of a healthier diet, and easy-to-make recipes. To order a Vegetarian Starter Kit, please visit PCRM's literature store. 3. Are carbohydrates bad for you? Some people imagine that pasta, bread, potatoes, and rice are fattening, but the opposite is actually true. Carbohydrate-rich foods are helpful for permanent weight control because they contain less than half the calories of fat, which means that replacing fatty foods with complex carbohydrates automatically cuts calories. It’s important to remember to eat healthful carbohydrates, such as whole grains, pasta, brown rice, and sweet potatoes. Processed carbohydrates, such as white bread and white rice, are not as healthful a choice because they have lost much of their fiber and other nutrients and tend to have a higher glycemic index. 4. Why low-fat? High-fat foods increase insulin resistance. Following a low-fat diet not only helps improve insulin Continue reading >>

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman,… Continue reading >>

Diabetic Low Carb Rice Alternatives

Diabetic Low Carb Rice Alternatives

We have become so used to eating things on top of something, wouldn't you agree? Things like pasta, rice, noodles and breads have become our staple foods – mainly because they are a cheaper source of food to produce on a large scale. And they tend to store for longer periods than fresh produce. So when it comes to rice, what can we do? An Inside Look At Rice Nutrition As you can see, rice is quite high in carbs for just a small amount (1/2 cup). Many people often consume way more than 1/2 cup at one sitting. And if you remember, carbs are the main nutrient that affects blood sugar and A1C levels – so you definitely want to limit your intake if not cut out rice altogether, which is often recommended. So if you were to cut rice out, what rice alternatives can you use? Let's explore a few ideas now. Diabetic Low Carb Rice Alternatives There are a few rice alternatives you can try. Cauliflower rice Konjac rice Cabbage chunk rice Other alternatives Cauliflower Rice Using cauliflower as rice may sound like a really strange idea but it really works. I remember the first time I served it up to my partner and he was pleasantly surprised it how good it was. If I can get stuff past him I know we're onto a winner! When you grind cauliflower up and cook it, it has a similar texture to rice and the flavor absorbs other saucy things that you might eat with it. Take this Chicken Massaman Curry as an example. It's served with cauliflower rice instead of standard rice. Served with cauliflower rice this meal is 13 g net carbs. Served with 1/2 cup brown rice it would be around 30 g carbs. Cauliflower rice is not exactly like rice, so it is something that you need to get used to – but when it comes to what we eat, that's like anything we want to change. Konjac Rice Image As we suggest Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Can people with diabetes eat potatoes? The answer is yes, and even more resounding when you have some info in your back pocket. Potatoes come in every form imaginable—from chips to potato salad, from fries to baked potatoes with butter and sour cream. Some forms are obviously more nutritious than others. And all can have varying effects on blood sugar. Here are some recommendations: Sweet potatoes and yams are good choices on the potato spectrum as they have a lower glycemic index and glycemic load than a regular baked russet potato, therefore affecting blood glucose less. Small red potatoes with the skin can also be a good choice. The skin provides fiber, which slows digestion and absorption. And small, whole potatoes may be easier to portion control. Serve a few on your plate as opposed to a whole baked potato or scoop of mashed potatoes. Try to limit fried potatoes and potato chips, choosing roasted, baked or broiled instead. Be aware of portion size. The plate method is an easy way to manage this: about ¼ of your plate should come from starchy foods and only the depth of a deck of cards. It might not be the potato itself wreaking havoc on blood sugar, but instead the portion of potatoes if it is more than about ¾ to 1 cup. Many, many years ago, nurses, dietitians, and diabetes educators were instructed to teach their patients with diabetes to eat certain foods and not eat others. But in more modern times, the belief and teaching method is based on making healthy food choices, understanding portion sizes, and learning the best times to eat in order to manage diabetes. This method of not having to eliminate foods from the diet is supported by the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Blood glucose control and food choice Continue reading >>

The Diabetic's Guide To Eating Rice

The Diabetic's Guide To Eating Rice

Replace white rice with brown If White Rice were to be a contestant on “Let’s Get These Blood Sugars Soaring” it would receive a standing ovation. It has a high score on the Glycemic Index - a list that grades foods according to how much they screw up your blood sugar. It’s naturally good at helping people develop diabetes. Each additional servings of white rice a week increases your chance of developing diabetes by 10%. That’s eating more than 4 servings a week, and it’s no laughing matter, considering how common white rice is. Fried rice at the chinese restaurant? White. Favorite cajun dirty rice at the family reunion? White. Mexican rice at your aunt’s house? White. Rice and veggies steamer bag in the frozen food isle? Yup, white again. Not to mention the plethora of rice pastas and gluten free breads that rely on this cheap, processed and refined grain. Brown rice is actually white rice that has not be stripped of its nutrients and refined. Two of those nutrients are fiber and magnesium - both of which have been shown to regulate blood sugar. Studies have shown that replacing white rice with brown rice even helps reduce the likelihood of developing diabetes. Eat less rice overall for best blood sugar control Replacing all white rice with brown rice is a good idea - reduces diabetes risk by 16%. Eating less rice overall is best - replacing rice with other grains reduces diabetes risk by 36%. Did you know a serving of rice is ½ cup? Here are some ways to make that half cup be enough. Instead of filling your plate with brown rice and sprinkling in some veggies, eat a plateful of veggies sprinkled with ½ cup of brown rice. Want even better control? Adapt a habit from our south of the border friends and serve beans whenever you eat brown rice. And since 5 Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Diet plays an important role in staying healthy, especially for people with diabetes. Many people wonder whether high-carbohydrate foods such as rice are healthy to eat. This article will explain how to count carbohydrates, how to incorporate rice into the diet, and what the healthy alternatives to rice are. Diabetes basics Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both. Insulin plays a crucial role in allowing blood sugar to enter the cells and be used for energy. There are two main types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes have abnormally high levels of blood sugar. This can damage many organs in the body if left untreated. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommend the following steps to manage diabetes: making healthy choices in eating engaging in regular physical activity or exercise taking medications, if required A nutritious diet is important in keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy level. The healthy range is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter mg/dL before meals or below 180 mg/dL after meals, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin. Various insulin delivery systems and protocols are used to manage blood sugar levels both between and at meal times. People with type 2 diabetes often manage their condition with diet and exercise, and with medications as needed to keep their blood sugar levels within the target range. These medications vary in how they work. People with diabetes will have different treatment plans, and they will respond to food, exercise, and medication differently. It is important that people consult with a doctor to get personalized recommendations on target blood suga Continue reading >>

Don't Drop The Potato

Don't Drop The Potato

Don't Drop the Potato by Berkeley Wellness Many people fear that potatoes will make them fat or cause other health problems. Are potatoes really such villains? Are they any better or worse than bread, rice, or other starchy grains? A half-baked myth Potatoes have a bad reputation, in part, because they have a high glycemic index (GI), meaning that their carbohydrates are quickly broken down into sugar, causing blood sugar and insulin levels to rise rapidly. This, in turn, increases fat storage and the risk of obesity and diabetes—at least in theory. A few studies have implicated potatoes in weight gain and diabetes. For instance, a 2009 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found a link between potato consumption and waist circumference in women (but not men). Earlier data from the Nurses’ Health Study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2006, linked potato intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes in obese women—especially when potatoes were eaten in place of whole grains. But there are plenty of caveats to consider before you drop the potato. For one, not all studies support the idea that high-GI diets—let alone potatoes, in particular—have such adverse effects. Several have found no relationship between high-GI diets and body fat or diabetes. In any case, the GI of potatoes and other foods depends on many factors, including how they’re cooked and what they’re eaten with. And not all varieties have such a high GI. Russet potatoes do, for example, but red potatoes rank moderately. Moreover, it’s hard to separate the effects of potatoes from those of other foods in a typical Western diet. That is, the undesirable associations seen in some studies could be due to the meat, refined grains, sugars and trans Continue reading >>

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Despite being the most popular vegetable in the United States, potatoes have fallen out of favour somewhat with nutritionists over the last few decades due to a relatively low nutrient density and high levels of quickly absorbed carbohydrates. Many diabetics avoid potatoes altogether for fear of exacerbating their condition. Fortunately the news is not all bad when it comes to diabetes and potatoes and most diabetics can include a modest level of potatoes in their diet. The main reason diabetics are cautious when it comes to potatoes is their very high glycemic index (GI) value. The glycemic index is important for diabetics because it is a measure of the impact a particular food has on blood glucose levels once it has been digested. Eating large amounts of foods with high GI values results in a large increase in blood sugar levels which would normally result in a corresponding rise in insulin to bring blood sugar levels back to a normal level within a few hours. Because diabetics have an impaired insulin response, blood sugar levels can remain very high for quite some time leading to the typical symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and nerve problems. Potatoes have a GI value that ranges from 65 to 80 which is considered high. By comparison table sugar (sucrose) has a GI of 63, white bread has a GI of 71, wholemeal bread a GI of 60, and brown rice a GI of 55. Interestingly the method of cooking and variety of potato can affect the GI value of potatoes greatly. Newer potatoes tend to have lower GI values than older potatoes. Waxy potato varieties such as Red Norland, Yellow Finn, and Red Pontiac have lower GI values than floury potato varieties such as Russet Burbank and Norgold Russet. A 2005 study published in The Journal of the Continue reading >>

Carbs And Cooking

Carbs And Cooking

Pasta, potatoes and rice... are all carbohydrates that cause a surge in blood glucose levels as they are broken down. For people with diabetes, these surges in glucose can be tricky to manage and cause problems over time. But what if simply changing the way these foods were prepared and cooked meant this was less likely to happen? An experiment on the BBC TV show Trust me, I’m a Doctor, led by Dr Denise Robertson (senior nutrition scientist at the University of Surrey), showed that eating cooled or reheated pasta – turning it into ‘resistant starch’ – could help to reduce the rise of blood glucose levels. Though further studies are needed, findings could have long-term benefits for people with diabetes... The experiment At Positano Italian restaurant in Guildford, Surrey, 10 of the staff agreed to take part in an experiment, devised by Dr Robertson. Each of them ate one bowl of white pasta a day for three days. On each day the pasta was prepared in a different way (as follows) and topped with the same simple tomato sauce. Day 1: Hot freshly cooked pasta Day 2: Cold pasta that had been chilled overnight Day 3: Pasta that had been chilled overnight and reheated After eating each bowl of pasta the participants measured their blood glucose levels every 15 minutes for two hours. The results Eating freshly cooked pasta caused the biggest rise in blood glucose.Eating freshly cooked pasta caused the biggest rise in blood glucose. Eating chilled pasta caused a slightly lower rise.Eating chilled pasta caused a slightly lower rise. Unexpectedly, pasta that had been cooked, chilled and then reheated caused the lowest rise of all.Unexpectedly, pasta that had been cooked, chilled and then reheated caused the lowest rise of all. How it works Starch is the most common carbohy Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat White Rice?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat White Rice?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. There are many foods that have question marks hanging over them when you think about healthy meal planning for people with diabetes. White rice is one of those foods. Diabetics can eat white rice, but should limit their intake since white rice has a high amount of carbs that can raise blood sugar. Most people with diabetes know that white rice is a starchy carbohydrate that raises blood sugar when eaten. And if you count carbohydrates, you also know that “one serving” of white rice is pretty small, compared to a typical serving in real life. One-third a cup of white rice is considered a serving and contains 15 grams of carbohydrates. Most people consume, on average, one to two cups of rice per serving, resulting in a carb intake of 45 to 90 grams of carbohydrates. As those carbs add up, the chance for a spike in blood glucose also goes up; especially with this simple carb white rice that has been processed and stripped of nutrients and fiber. If you haven't measured out a 1/3 cup serving of white rice, do so — it's eye-opening to see just how small that portion is. Rice substitutes The good news? There are many grains that can be substituted for white rice. And many of these grains are becoming more widely available in restaurants and grocery stores. One of these substitutions is brown rice. This type of rice has not been stripped of the bran and germ portions of the grain, as white rice has. The rice bran and rice germ in brown rice provide valuable nutrients and most importantly, in relation to blood sugar control, fiber. In addition to brown rice, oth Continue reading >>

Beans May Be Beneficial For People With Diabetes

Beans May Be Beneficial For People With Diabetes

People with Type 2 diabetes may be able to improve their health by eating a daily dose of beans, according to a new study. Research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine on Oct. 22 shows that subjects who consumed one cup of beans daily for three months were able to lower their blood sugar and blood pressure from their original levels, even more than another group who ate a high-wheat fiber diet. "People with diabetes did better in terms of blood sugar control on the bean diet versus a diet without beans, which was otherwise extremely healthy," says researcher Dr. David J.A. Jenkins, professor of medicine and nutrition at the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, said to WebMD. Beans or legumes are considered low-glycemic index foods. The glycemic index orders food by how they affect a person's blood sugar level. High glycemic scores are digested quicker and cause a spike in blood sugar, which is often followed by a quick drop in blood sugar levels. Low foods are digested slowly and raise your blood sugar slowly. Foods like white rice, watermelon and boiled red potatoes with skin are considered high on the index and have a score of 70 or up, according to the Mayo Clinic. Examples of low-glycemic foods include grapefruits, skim milk, raw carrots and apples, all of which receive a score of 55 and under. Medium foods, which score in the 56 to 69 range, include sweet corn, bananas and certain types of ice cream. The study involved 121 men and women who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Participants were assigned to a group that was instructed to eat a healthy diet high in wheat fiber or a group told to eat a healthy diet including a cup of legumes a day (about two servings). They were also given a checklist of recommended foods and qua Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Truth About Food Serving Sizes

Diabetes: The Truth About Food Serving Sizes

Confused about how much you can eat when you have diabetes? First you need to know how much food is in a serving. It may be different from what you expect. Let’s say you eat a cup of rice at dinner. But a serving is actually considered 1/3 cup. So you got three times as many carbs as you thought. To outsmart those mistakes, get to know what a serving size really holds. And for expert help, talk to your dietitian or a certified diabetes educator. 1/2 banana 1 small apple, orange, or pear 1/2 cup chopped, cooked, or canned fruit 1 cup raw leafy vegetables 1/2 cup other vegetables cooked, raw (chopped), or canned 1/2 cup vegetable juice 1 slice of bread 1/2 English muffin, bun, small bagel, or pita bread 1 6-inch tortilla 4-6 crackers 2 rice cakes 1 ounce ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup cooked cereal, pasta, or bulgur 1/3 cup cooked rice 1 small potato or 1/2 large potato 1/2 cup sweet potatoes or yams 1/2 cup corn kernels or other starchy vegetables such as winter squash, peas, or lima beans 2-3 ounces cooked lean beef, veal, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey, or fish 2-3 ounces low-fat natural cheese (such as Swiss, cheddar, Muenster, parmesan, mozzarella, and others) 1/2 cup cooked dry beans 1/4 cup tofu 1 egg (or an equal serving of egg substitute) 2 tablespoons peanut butter 2 ounces processed cheese (American) 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese 1/2 cup canned tuna (packed in water) 1 cup low-fat milk 1 cup low-fat yogurt (unsweetened, or sweetened with aspartame or other artificial sweeteners) Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes And Polished Rice?

Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes And Polished Rice?

Answered by: Dr Ambrish Mithal | Chairman, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Medanta - The Medicity, Gurugram Q: Should diabetics strictly avoid potatoes and polished rice? Potatoes are not possible to avoid while making cutlets and puffs. Is it ok to mix small amount of coconut in cooking or else coconut should also be avoided? A:Some amount of potatoes and polished rice are quite fine for diabetics. Rice and potatoes are not banned. It is more important to avoid all fried food - eg. boiled potatoes are fine but not fried cutlets! Also, you could use coconut for cooking. Continue reading >>

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