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Can Diabetics Eat Peanuts And Raisins?

Diabetic Snack & Party Mixes

Diabetic Snack & Party Mixes

Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Continue reading >>

Is Peanut Butter Good For Treating Low Blood Sugar?

Is Peanut Butter Good For Treating Low Blood Sugar?

A: This is a great question and I’m glad that you asked! When your blood glucose drops too low (usually below 70 mg/dl), you need to “treat” this to help bring your glucose back up to a safe level, which is typically above 80 mg/dl. The best treatment for low blood glucose (also called “hypoglycemia”) is a quick-acting form of carbohydrate. Carbohydrate foods that are digested and absorbed quickly from the intestine into the bloodstream will bring your blood glucose level up quickly. Good examples of low blood glucose treatments are glucose tablets, glucose gels, fruit juice, regular soda, skim milk and raisins. Eating foods that contain mostly protein or fat will not raise your blood glucose and may even prevent your glucose from getting back to a safe level. Peanut butter is an example – it contains mostly fat, some protein and a little bit of carbohydrate (usually from added sugar). Other foods that you should not use to treat a low include chocolate candy bars, nuts, whole milk and cheese. They contain too much fat to effectively raise your blood glucose. Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Increase Blood Sugar Levels

5 Foods That Increase Blood Sugar Levels

Common sense dictates that diabetics should avoid cakes, pies and cookies. Since their systems already have difficulty breaking down glucose, eating sugary treats can quickly spike a diabetic's blood sugar level. And that's not good. High levels of glucose, over time, can result in long-term health issues. In reality, most diabetics can have a small pastry from time to time - if they adjust other portions of their food intake and adjust their medicine accordingly, especially if they are insulin-dependent. While the impact of sugary goodies on a diabetic seems apparent, there are other not-so-obvious foods that can also cause blood sugar spikes. hey also contain simple carbohydrates - which the body breaks down into sugar and sends along to the blood stream. A properly functioning pancreas produces insulin that turns the sugar molecule into energy. A diabetic's pancreas, though, either cannot produce enough insulin or none at all. That's why careful consumption of "hidden sugar" foods is an important part of managing a diabetic's care. Here are 5 "hidden sugar" foods that surprisingly contribute to blood sugar issues: White Rice Who doesn't love a favorite chicken dish served over a bed of rice? One cup of cooked white rice, though, packs as many carbohydrates as three slices of white bread. Rice also has very little fiber, which helps keep blood sugar levels constant. White Bread Peanut butter and jelly between two slices of white bread might be a meal of choice for many children. But the white bread can be more of a problem than the jelly for a diabetic. White bread is made from refined flour - which the body turns quickly into sugar and causes rapid blood sugar fluctuations. Pasta and Marinara Sauce Diabetics must be careful when the dinner group votes "Italian". Ther Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

Are you bored with sugar-free candy, low carbohydrate pasta, and endless chicken dinners? Having diabetes does not mean that your diet should be boring. In fact, it should be the opposite. Variety keeps your palate interested and ensures that you get a healthy balance of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. The following 5 foods may or may not be a regular part of your diet, but each has a positive effect on diabetes management and prevention. Experiment with some of the “try this” options below for an easy way to incorporate these foods into your meals. Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds are a humble snack. They often sit on the shelf overlooked because of the hoards of positive press that almonds and walnuts get. Almonds and walnuts are very healthful nuts, but sunflower seeds are also full of important vitamins and minerals. Some of the nutrients in sunflower seeds that make them unique are copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence and combination of so many of these nutrients can be hard to come by in common foods. Sunflower seeds have about 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein in an ounce of kernels. The best part is that sunflower seeds, while high in total fat (about 14 grams), contain mostly polyunsaturated fat, which researchers believe is the best type of fat to combat diabetes. Try this: Swap out your peanuts for sunflower seeds. Or hunt down a jar of sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter for an easy way to get your fix. Salmon Salmon boasts numerous health benefits. It’s a great source of protein that is low in saturated fat and has important omega-3 fatty acid for excellent heart health. The combination of omega-3 and polyunsaturated fats in salmon keeps blood pressure down and protects the heart from disease. Research Continue reading >>

11 Surprising Benefits Of Raisins

11 Surprising Benefits Of Raisins

The health benefits of raisins include treating constipation, acidosis, anemia, fever, and sexual dysfunction. They have also been known to help in weight gain in a healthy way, as well as for their positive impact on eye health, dental care, and bone quality. Health Benefits of Raisins What are Raisins? Raisins are obtained by drying grapes, either in the sun or in driers, which turns the grapes into golden, green or black gems. These delicacies are everyone’s favorites, particularly children. They are widely used in cultural cooking around the world (especially in desserts) and are also added to health tonics, snacks, and compact, high-energy food supplements for mountaineers, backpackers, and campers. Health Benefits of Raisins When the nutritional values and health benefits of raisins are considered, “gems” is an accurate name for them. Let’s see how they help our body; Relieve Constipation When ingested, raisins swell because the fiber present in them shrinks in a dried form, but begins to swell due to the natural fluids. This adds bulk to the food moving through the intestinal tract and ultimately helps provide relief from constipation. The type of fiber in raisins is considered insoluble fiber because it takes in water and gains volume in that way. Besides reducing constipation, they can also help to stop loose stools, again by absorbing its liquid and reducing the frequency and unpredictability of diarrhea. Raisins, like all dried fruits, are very good tools for gaining weight in a healthy way since they are full of fructose and glucose and contain a lot of potential energy. They form an ideal part of a diet for athletes or bodybuilders who need a powerful boost of energy, or for those who want to put on weight without accumulating unhealthy amounts of c Continue reading >>

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

1 Avoid purine-rich foods. Since uric acid is produced from the metabolism of purine in the body, it is best to avoid foods that contain purine. Urate crystals accumulate in the joints if uric acid is elevated and this can aggravate joint pain in gout. Also, uric acid elevation can increase insulin resistance which is a condition wherein the body do not respond to the function of insulin[1]. This can further elevate the blood sugar levels of a person, leading to diabetic symptoms. Purine-rich foods are mackerel, anchovies, organ meats, dried beans, peas, canned goods, instant noodles, wine and beer. 2 Avoid foods rich in fructose. Foods rich in fructose consume a lot of adenosine triphosphate (or ATP) when metabolized. This ATP is an energy-supplying molecule that the cells in the body use. Over-consumption of ATP leads to its depletion and results in the generation of substances such as lactic acid and uric acid, thereby increasing the levels of uric acid in the blood. Also, fructose is considered a sugar. Consuming foods rich in fructose can elevate the blood sugar of a person and lead to occurrence of symptoms. Foods to avoid are apples, bananas, pears, agave, melons, asparagus, beans, broccoli, cabbage, onion, tomato, peanuts, raisins, figs, carbonated drinks, fruit drinks, ketchup, canned goods, chocolate, pastries and breakfast cereals. 3 Avoid alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the removal of uric acid from the body. When alcohol is converted to lactic acid, it reduces the amount of uric acid that is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This is because the lactic acid competes with the uric acid in terms of being removed by the kidneys through urine. Increased levels of ethanol (alcohol) in the body increase the body's production of uric acid by increasing Continue reading >>

7 Health Benefits Of Raisins During Pregnancy

7 Health Benefits Of Raisins During Pregnancy

The moment you learn you are pregnant, your life changes. Some of these changes are pleasant, while others, not so much. One of the biggest changes, apart from your growing body, is the anxiety about the food you eat. Gone are the days of eating without a care. Suddenly, you have to watch each morsel you consume, each drop you drink. That can take the fun out eating. But you need to be careful while pregnant. Now it’s more than just about you and your health. It is also about your baby. So, what foods are okay to eat during pregnancy? There are a number of healthy food options for you to try. Raisin is one of them. Benefits Of Eating Raisins During Pregnancy: Raisins are versatile. You can add them to a number of delicacies, or you can munch on them as they are. These tiny dried fruits have a lot to offer – both to you and to your baby. Here are the major benefits of raisins during pregnancy: A pregnant woman often ends up with anemia due to iron deficiency (1). You need additional sources of iron to provide for your growing baby. Yes, you can use supplements, but isn’t it better to get all your nutrients through food? Raisins contain a lot of iron as well as Vitamin B complex. If you consume raisins during your pregnancy, you can prevent anemia and also treat fatigue and other related symptoms. 2. Eases Constipation: Feeling ‘stuck’ because of constipation? You are not alone! Many women suffer from constipation and other digestive issues during pregnancy (2). You can blame your hormones for it! But the tiny raisins can provide the solution to this often-irritating problem. Raisins contain fiber, which help to make bowel movements easier and smoother. [ Read: Natural Cures For Constipation During Pregnancy ] 3. Increases Appetite: A lack of appetite often plag Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

When your blood sugar dips, it can leave you feeling hungry, shaky, and lightheaded. This can happen to anyone who hasn’t eaten in several hours. When blood sugar drops below normal levels, it’s called hypoglycemia. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening complication of diabetes medication, other health problems like infection, or inadequate caloric intake. You can lower your chances of low blood sugar—and treat it when it occurs—with some simple steps. Know the Symptoms Sugar, or glucose, is a key source of energy for the body. When blood sugar drops, you may get these symptoms: Hunger Shakiness Sweating Dizziness Lightheadedness Confusion Anxiety Feeling tired or sleepy Headache What You Can Do Most of the sugar or glucose in your blood comes from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the sugars and starches in grains, beans, vegetables, fruit, milk and milk products, honey, and sugar. If you don’t have diabetes and you’re feeling the unpleasant effects of a drop in blood sugar, eat or drink something with carbohydrates. Good choices are a piece of fruit, a few whole wheat crackers, a glass of milk, or a carton of yogurt. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can come on suddenly and needs to be treated right away so it doesn’t get worse. Eat or drink a quickly digested carbohydrate food, such as: ½ cup fruit juice ½ cup of a regular soft drink (not a diet soda) 1 cup of milk 5 or 6 hard candies 4 or 5 saltine crackers 2 tablespoons of raisins 3 to 4 teaspoons of sugar or honey 3 or 4 glucose tablets or a serving of glucose gel Each of these choices provides about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Wait for 15 or 20 minutes, then check your blood sugar with a blood glucose meter. If your blood sugar is still low, have another portion of carb Continue reading >>

What Can Hamsters Eat? Carrots, Grapes, Tomatoes, And More

What Can Hamsters Eat? Carrots, Grapes, Tomatoes, And More

By Geoff Williams If you’re a new hamster owner or considering whether or not to purchase a pet hamster, you might be wondering what hamsters can eat. In reality, however, the question to ask is: what should hamsters eat? While they can eat a variety of things, some foods are far better for hamsters than others. Here are some dos and don’ts when it comes to feeding your fuzzy friend. Feeding Your Hamster: General Guidelines The easiest and safest approach to feeding your hamster is to go with a complete meal that you can find at a pet or store. “I recommend one of the complete [hamster] meals that comes in square blocks. They’re a pelleted feed,” said Robyn McGeorge, registered veterinary technician and owner of Robyn’s Nest in Germantown, Ohio. These pellets are preferable to a hamster-formulated seed mixture because many hamsters will pick out what they like from these mixtures, missing some of the nutritional value in the seeds they don’t eat, McGeorge said. Cindy Cribbs, owners Haven for Hamsters Rescue and Sanctuary, feeds their hamsters about a tablespoon of food once a day. Giving your hamster any more food than that may lead them to hoard their food. “People may think they are eating all their food when in fact, they just hid it from you,” she said. Can Hamsters Eat Carrots? Carrots are safe for hamsters to eat, however, they should be given in moderation, said Dr. Carol Osborne, owner of Chagrin Falls Veterinary Center & Pet Clinic in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Because carrots have sugar in them, they may not be the ideal snack for dwarf hamsters, which are prone to diabetes. The problem, however, generally isn't with carrots themselves, Osborne said. The problem is that many people overfeed their hamsters, which can lead them to become overweight a Continue reading >>

​southern Gal Talks Peanuts And Diabetes

​southern Gal Talks Peanuts And Diabetes

The peanut is nature's powerful little nut full of plant-based protein that helps control blood sugar. Individuals with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes must focus their diets on foods that positively affect their glycemic index. Nutritionists and dietitians around the world realize that nutritional management can result in less frequent insulin use and better weight management.1 The glycemic index (GI): a ranking of carbohydrates (1-100) and the higher the rank the worse fluctuation of blood sugar. Peanuts are considered a low glycemic index food at 14 because they are slowly digested and cause sugar to gradually be released into the bloodstream.2 “Peanuts contain not only plant protein (in fact, they are higher in protein than other nuts), but they also contain fiber and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Protein, fiber and fat are important foods for maintaining satiety and supporting normal blood sugar levels; critical factors in weight management and preventing diabetes.”3 This means persons with a family history of diabetes can eat peanuts to help prevent the onset of the disease while ensuring weight management by avoiding overindulgence? Yes! Imagine the joy of learning how helpful Virginia peanuts can be for so many people! As a result of better understanding how peanuts impact diabetes, here is a list of eight possible ways to eat peanuts as way of treatment and prevention: 1.Sprinkle roasted peanuts in your salad in place of croutons 2.Put down the potato chips and grab a handful of Hope and Harmony Cajun peanuts as an evening snack 3.Use salted peanuts to make homemade peanut butter that contains far less sugar than store bought peanut butter 4.Make trail mix using peanuts, raisins, almonds, and whole-wheat cheerios 5.Entertain kids and allow them make peanut covered Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Raisins

Can Diabetics Eat Raisins

Unlike in the previous years where a diabetic diet had a lot of restrictions, with the advancement in technology and ways to monitor blood sugar levels diabetic people have a wide variety of options on what they can eat. You can eat fruits such as raisins which provide the body with the essential carbohydrates without having to worry about a drastic rise in your blood sugar levels. To ensure that you regulate your blood sugar levels it is advisable to ensure that you take a balanced diet. As much as you are trying to regulate your blood sugar levels and monitoring your carbohydrate intake, it’s a fact the body still needs carbohydrates to provide energy to the cell. Instead of taking a carbohydrate meal you can substitute it with taking raisins which is a fruit rich in carbohydrates, where a single can carbohydrate exchange is equivalent to 2 tablespoons of raisins. For efficiency, you can consider serving raisins as a substitute for other carbohydrate sources in your diet. Glycemic Index Typically, on a glycemic index scale raisins is considered to have a low to moderate glycemic index implying that on taking raisins as part of your diabetic diet, it won’t have a fatal impact on your blood sugar levels. In a general perspective, raisins are small in size and one may be tempted to consume more of it. As a diabetic, to prevent a drastic rise in blood sugar levels takes one at a time. Raisins and diabetes A lot of questions have been raised concerning raisins and whether it is safe to take it while diabetic, with some people claiming that they used to take raisins and have now been diagnosed with diabetes. Well, worry no more; there is good news for you. With scientific prove, raisins is a diabetic diet is totally acceptable and healthy, all you have to do is balance Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Raisins Eating raisins or other dried fruits may be a better option than snacking on cookies, but it’ll still spike your blood sugar. Why? During the dehydration process, fruits’ natural sugars become very concentrated, causing an unhealthy elevation in blood sugar when they are rapidly absorbed by the body. Just one more reason to stick with whole, fresh fruit options like grapefruit, cantaloupe, strawberries, and peaches. Previous Next More Photos Pancakes and Syrup Fruit Juice Continue reading >>

Healthy Snacking With Diabetes

Healthy Snacking With Diabetes

Snacks are one of my favorite kinds of meals to eat. Those little meals in between meals to keep your hunger pangs away and to keep your blood sugar levels stable can be a great resource in your diabetes management. They can also make your day extremely difficult if you eat the wrong kind of snack. So what to do? I try to keep my snacking lower carb if I can so it has minimal impact on my meter readings and my waistline. We all know things like string cheese and free veggies are good snack ideas. I have been doing some research (and yes, it was fun and delicious) on some more ideas for foods to grab when you want a quick bite. Not all are low-carb, but they are all delicious, healthy, and diabetes friendly. Wasabi Wow Trail Mix from Trader Joe’s. It’s a blend of wasabi peas, peanuts, almonds, dried cranberries and golden raisins. I love the crunch and how the kick from the wasabi plays with the sweetness of the dried cranberries and raisins. I have been known to devour a whole bag. Maybe that’s not the most diabetes friendly idea, but if you have the handful they recommend, you are only getting 13g of carbohydrates. Not so bad if you ask me. Pepperoni Chips. This is not a new idea to people who are into the low carb thing, but I just picked up on it and am addicted. All you do is place sliced pepperoni on a baking sheet and pop it in a 425 degree oven for 10 minutes. Take them out, and use a paper towel to soak up the grease. Toss them back in the oven for another 2-4 minutes until they are nice and crispy. You can use the “chips” as alternatives to crackers- they are amazing with cheese, in dips, or eat them as is. Which I do all of the time. Roasted Turkey Breast with Cheese. I make these for me and my daughter a lot. Especially when I roast a whole turkey b Continue reading >>

5 Health Benefits Of Eating Peanuts

5 Health Benefits Of Eating Peanuts

Healthy Peanuts What if one drug could help curb your appetite, lower blood pressure, stabilize blood sugar, and decrease your risk for heart disease? You’d take it, right? The inexpensive, accessible and oh-so-easy-to-eat peanut has been shown to do all that and more. Whether your goal is weight loss or better overall health, there are some convincing arguments for including peanuts in your diet on a nearly daily basis. Note: Since peanuts are high in fat, moderation is key here: 1 to 1-½ ounces a day can provide the health benefits outlined here. Editor's Note: We also recognize that peanut allergies are a very real concern for many, as discussed in Peanut Allergies at School. All recommendations here are for those who can safely consume peanuts. 1. Keep your appetite from going nuts Peanuts are a high satiety food, which means they make you feel fuller for longer. In a study published in The Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, participants who snacked on peanuts ate less later. The satiety value of peanuts is not solely a result of their fat, fiber, or protein content, but “from the synergy of all of these components,” said Dr. Richard Mattes, Professor of Nutrition Science at Purdue University. You may also eat less when you have peanuts or peanut butter at breakfast, said Kathy McManus, Director of the Department of Nutrition at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, “Because they have the effectof stabilizing blood sugar, you’re not going to feel hungry as soon.” 3. Reduce your risk of diabetes and control blood sugar One study found that replacing one serving of red meat daily with one serving of peanuts could reduce your risk of diabetes by a whopping 21%. Peanuts can slow the absorption of carbohydrates and, when you eat them in the morning, ca Continue reading >>

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