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Can Diabetics Eat Peanuts And Raisins?

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Here, Dr. Suzanne Nelson explains how raisins can still be enjoyed by diabetics because they are a low glycemic index food—they don’t cause sharp spikes to blood glucose. RAISINS AND DIABETES Recently, while answering consumer-related health questions at a Sun-Maid exhibit booth, I was approached by a middle-aged woman. She said “I’m so disappointed, I love Sun-Maid raisins but I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and can’t eat them anymore because they’re high in sugar.” I quickly responded, ” I’ve got great news for you! Let me explain.” The reality is that including raisins in your diet is completely acceptable even when you’re trying to control your blood sugar levels. The key is to balance your intake of carbohydrates with fat and protein to prevent major blood glucose fluctuations. If you’re following a carbohydrate exchange meal plan to help control your diabetes, 2 tablespoons of raisins count as a single carbohydrate exchange, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. You can use one serving of raisins in place of any other carbohydrate source in a given meal, such as a 15-gram serving of grains, starch or dairy. Note: Always check food labels – unlike Sun-Maid, some manufacturers add sugar to raisins. Another important tool for diabetics to use is the glycemic index, which is a measure of how your blood sugar may respond to different foods. Certain types of foods have a low glycemic index, meaning that they do not cause sharp spikes in blood glucose levels. Raisins help contribute to blood glucose control because they have a relatively low glycemic index compared to other food and they also contain fiber and antioxidants. THE PROOF IS IN THE RAISIN PUDDING Researchers studied 4 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snack & Party Mixes

Diabetic Snack & Party Mixes

Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Continue reading >>

5 Health Benefits Of Eating Peanuts

5 Health Benefits Of Eating Peanuts

Healthy Peanuts What if one drug could help curb your appetite, lower blood pressure, stabilize blood sugar, and decrease your risk for heart disease? You’d take it, right? The inexpensive, accessible and oh-so-easy-to-eat peanut has been shown to do all that and more. Whether your goal is weight loss or better overall health, there are some convincing arguments for including peanuts in your diet on a nearly daily basis. Note: Since peanuts are high in fat, moderation is key here: 1 to 1-½ ounces a day can provide the health benefits outlined here. Editor's Note: We also recognize that peanut allergies are a very real concern for many, as discussed in Peanut Allergies at School. All recommendations here are for those who can safely consume peanuts. 1. Keep your appetite from going nuts Peanuts are a high satiety food, which means they make you feel fuller for longer. In a study published in The Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, participants who snacked on peanuts ate less later. The satiety value of peanuts is not solely a result of their fat, fiber, or protein content, but “from the synergy of all of these components,” said Dr. Richard Mattes, Professor of Nutrition Science at Purdue University. You may also eat less when you have peanuts or peanut butter at breakfast, said Kathy McManus, Director of the Department of Nutrition at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, “Because they have the effectof stabilizing blood sugar, you’re not going to feel hungry as soon.” 3. Reduce your risk of diabetes and control blood sugar One study found that replacing one serving of red meat daily with one serving of peanuts could reduce your risk of diabetes by a whopping 21%. Peanuts can slow the absorption of carbohydrates and, when you eat them in the morning, ca Continue reading >>

How Celery Can Supercharge Your Snacks

How Celery Can Supercharge Your Snacks

Celery is often called a “negative calorie food,” so how can you NOT try to eat as much as you can? It’s nutritious, filling, tasty, low-carb, and an excellent delivery device. If you don’t already, reap the benefits of celery by using it regularly in snacks. Don’t forget to eat the leaves too…they have more magnesium and calcium than the stalks. Celery is a great choice when you have diabetes. Celery fights inflammation, especially in the digestive tract. Inflammation is thought to play a role in insulin resistance. It is also a great source of antioxidants and fiber. Celery is not only soothing to your stomach, it can also calm your mood. Celery is beneficial for eyes, helps blood pressure, and can help lower bad cholesterol. It is also a helpful for polycystic ovarian syndrome. Snack Ideas for Celery Because the celery stalks are so easy to stuff, this is my favorite way to eat it. You surely already know about peanut butter and “ants on a log” (peanut butter with raisins on top). You can also stuff celery sticks with the following: Cream cheese or goat cheese. Alone or mixed with other ingredients such as nuts, olives, cranberries, bacon, etc Hummus Guacamole Sprinkle a chile lime spice on top of celery sticks such as Tajin. Other Great Stuffed Celery Ideas Any recipe that already has celery as an ingredient can be a great potential stuffing. Just omit the chopped celery and stuff the celery stick with the other ingredients. Tuna salad (See below) Egg salad Waldorf salad (chopped apples, walnuts, and raisins mixed with mayo and lemon juice topped with a sprinkle of cinnamon and nutmeg. You could use broccoli and bacon too) Potato salad Seafood or crab salad Celery Stuffed with Tuna Salad “Picture Recipe” I believe we all need to learn to cook wit Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Acute Effects Of Raisin Consumption On Glucose And Insulin Reponses In Healthy Individuals

Acute Effects Of Raisin Consumption On Glucose And Insulin Reponses In Healthy Individuals

Go to: Methods Participants Inclusion criteria included men or non-pregnant women aged 18–75 years who were in good health. Individuals with a known history of AIDS, hepatitis, diabetes or a heart condition, or individuals taking medication or with any condition that might make participation dangerous to the individual or affect the results were excluded. A total of ten participants were studied. Using the t distribution and assuming an average CV of within-individual variation of incremental AUC (iAUC) values of 25 %, n 10 participants has 80 % power to detect a 33 % difference in iAUC with two-tailed P < 0·05. Protocol The study was open-label with a partial randomised, cross-over design using standard GI methodology (ISO 26642:2010; International Organization for Standardization). Eligible participants were studied on four separate days over a period of 2–8 weeks with an interval of no less than 40 h and no more than 2 weeks between tests. On each test day, participants came to the clinic in the morning after a 10–14 h overnight fast. Participants were asked to maintain stable dietary and activity habits throughout their participation in the study. If any participant was not feeling well or had not complied with the preceding experimental conditions, the test was not carried out and was rescheduled for another day. On each test occasion participants were weighed, and two fasting blood samples were obtained by finger-stick at 5-min intervals. Finger-stick blood samples were collected from hands warmed with an electric heating pad for 3–5 min before each sample. Blood samples were collected into two separate vials: one (two or three drops of blood) for glucose analysis and the other (between six and eight drops of blood) for insulin. After the second fasting s Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

10 Things Not To Feed Your Dog

10 Things Not To Feed Your Dog

We love our dogs—but just like kids, they can get into things they should not eat. This is the first of four lists of ‘10 Things You Should Not Feed your Dog'. Here is the first list of 10 food items that you should never feed your dog: Chocolate Onions Tomato stems or leaves Pits from peaches or plums Raisins Rhubarb leaves Sugary foods Tobacco Bones Nuts First and most importantly, everything you feed your dog should be in moderation. Even if it's supposedly safe, do not give your dog large amounts of any people food. As for the food items on this list, never give them to your dog. Yes, I am sure that there are dogs that have eaten some of the above items and lived to tell about it without harmful side effects. However, the purpose of this article is to help dog owners become aware of the items that should not be given to our beloved buddies and why! We believe it safest to err on the side of caution; that is why our lists are so stringent. Always, always, check with your vet first! Why You Should Not Feed Your Dog These Foods Now for the reasons why you should not feed your dog these foods: Chocolate—Chocolate, especially baker's chocolate, is dangerous for dogs. Cats are mostly unaffected since they do not like the taste of chocolate; however, dogs love it. Chocolate contains various chemicals called methylxanthine alkaloids. Some types of chocolate have more of these chemicals than others. Relatively small amounts of chocolate can cause serious problems such as constriction of the arteries and increased heart rate. Large amounts may cause even more dire symptoms, and a pound of milk chocolate can possibly kill a 16-pound dog. Make sure your children understand how important it is not to feed your dog chocolate. Almond bark and other chocolate substitutes are Continue reading >>

Is Peanut Butter Good For Treating Low Blood Sugar?

Is Peanut Butter Good For Treating Low Blood Sugar?

A: This is a great question and I’m glad that you asked! When your blood glucose drops too low (usually below 70 mg/dl), you need to “treat” this to help bring your glucose back up to a safe level, which is typically above 80 mg/dl. The best treatment for low blood glucose (also called “hypoglycemia”) is a quick-acting form of carbohydrate. Carbohydrate foods that are digested and absorbed quickly from the intestine into the bloodstream will bring your blood glucose level up quickly. Good examples of low blood glucose treatments are glucose tablets, glucose gels, fruit juice, regular soda, skim milk and raisins. Eating foods that contain mostly protein or fat will not raise your blood glucose and may even prevent your glucose from getting back to a safe level. Peanut butter is an example – it contains mostly fat, some protein and a little bit of carbohydrate (usually from added sugar). Other foods that you should not use to treat a low include chocolate candy bars, nuts, whole milk and cheese. They contain too much fat to effectively raise your blood glucose. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Nuts And Raisins ? | Best Health – When Diabetics Eat Too Much Sugar

Can Diabetics Eat Nuts And Raisins ? | Best Health – When Diabetics Eat Too Much Sugar

When Diabetics Eat Too Much Sugar This can also cause gestational diabetes (gd). Eating raisins improve blood sugar control, reduce blood pressure and 2. Suffering from this form of diabetes, you should consume raisins in moderation can certainly maintain a place for the diabetic person's diet as long as the proper portions are maintained. Here, we offer you 10 diabetes-friendly options, many of which are low-carbohydrate, nutty, popcorn and spicy combinations. Everyone will love 23, the yogurt coated raisins sound like a double dose of healthy food or vanilla to spread fruit nuts, then 21, read this publication, know 7 benefits of eating during pregnancy. They are good raisins for diabetes youtube. The 10 worst foods for diabetes are raisins of bauer joy. Search for Googleuser content. And the fruit on a plate with sauces and nuts make an appetizer that will hit you The 10 worst foods for diabetes raisins of joy bauer. Can people with diabetes eat nuts? Read health-related blogs trying to reduce blood sugar levels? Raisins help what nuts a diabetic can change their self-management of life. Diabetes raisin joy bauer the 10 worst foods for diabetes bauer joybauer photo gallery url? Q webcache. Can diabetics eat sweet potatoes? True diabetes is a chronic disease that the health benefits of raisins include relief from constipation, anemia, fever and sexual dysfunction. By controlling these hormones, people who eat raisins can improve their i and almonds every mrng before bedtime 4, this is a detailed article on how dry fruit affects their health. 100 g of fresh black or white grapes 15. Suzanne Nelson explains how raisins can still be enjoyed by diabetics because they are a low glycemic index food that does not cause sharp spikes in blood glucose. Nuts and cashews have low Continue reading >>

11 Surprising Benefits Of Raisins

11 Surprising Benefits Of Raisins

The health benefits of raisins include treating constipation, acidosis, anemia, fever, and sexual dysfunction. They have also been known to help in weight gain in a healthy way, as well as for their positive impact on eye health, dental care, and bone quality. Health Benefits of Raisins What are Raisins? Raisins are obtained by drying grapes, either in the sun or in driers, which turns the grapes into golden, green or black gems. These delicacies are everyone’s favorites, particularly children. They are widely used in cultural cooking around the world (especially in desserts) and are also added to health tonics, snacks, and compact, high-energy food supplements for mountaineers, backpackers, and campers. Health Benefits of Raisins When the nutritional values and health benefits of raisins are considered, “gems” is an accurate name for them. Let’s see how they help our body; Relieve Constipation When ingested, raisins swell because the fiber present in them shrinks in a dried form, but begins to swell due to the natural fluids. This adds bulk to the food moving through the intestinal tract and ultimately helps provide relief from constipation. The type of fiber in raisins is considered insoluble fiber because it takes in water and gains volume in that way. Besides reducing constipation, they can also help to stop loose stools, again by absorbing its liquid and reducing the frequency and unpredictability of diarrhea. Raisins, like all dried fruits, are very good tools for gaining weight in a healthy way since they are full of fructose and glucose and contain a lot of potential energy. They form an ideal part of a diet for athletes or bodybuilders who need a powerful boost of energy, or for those who want to put on weight without accumulating unhealthy amounts of c Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

When your blood sugar dips, it can leave you feeling hungry, shaky, and lightheaded. This can happen to anyone who hasn’t eaten in several hours. When blood sugar drops below normal levels, it’s called hypoglycemia. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening complication of diabetes medication, other health problems like infection, or inadequate caloric intake. You can lower your chances of low blood sugar—and treat it when it occurs—with some simple steps. Know the Symptoms Sugar, or glucose, is a key source of energy for the body. When blood sugar drops, you may get these symptoms: Hunger Shakiness Sweating Dizziness Lightheadedness Confusion Anxiety Feeling tired or sleepy Headache What You Can Do Most of the sugar or glucose in your blood comes from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the sugars and starches in grains, beans, vegetables, fruit, milk and milk products, honey, and sugar. If you don’t have diabetes and you’re feeling the unpleasant effects of a drop in blood sugar, eat or drink something with carbohydrates. Good choices are a piece of fruit, a few whole wheat crackers, a glass of milk, or a carton of yogurt. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can come on suddenly and needs to be treated right away so it doesn’t get worse. Eat or drink a quickly digested carbohydrate food, such as: ½ cup fruit juice ½ cup of a regular soft drink (not a diet soda) 1 cup of milk 5 or 6 hard candies 4 or 5 saltine crackers 2 tablespoons of raisins 3 to 4 teaspoons of sugar or honey 3 or 4 glucose tablets or a serving of glucose gel Each of these choices provides about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Wait for 15 or 20 minutes, then check your blood sugar with a blood glucose meter. If your blood sugar is still low, have another portion of carb Continue reading >>

Do Raisins Affect Blood Glucose?

Do Raisins Affect Blood Glucose?

All carbohydrates have an effect on blood-glucose levels, including raisins -- but the effect will vary depending on the amount of raisins you eat. One serving of raisins for people with diabetes should contain 15 grams of carbohydrate, which is about 2 tablespoons of raisins. Unless you consume large amounts of raisins, they won't greatly increase your blood-glucose levels. The glycemic index measures how much a carbohydrate-containing food increases your blood sugar. The lower the score, the less effect a food has on blood sugar levels. Differences in processing and other factors can cause the same food to have different results on the glycemic index. Raisins have a GI value of between 49 and 64, which means they have a low to medium GI score. Effect on Blood Glucose Raisins may enhance insulin sensitivity and lower your blood-glucose levels after meals. Consuming 50 grams of carbohydrate from raisins before exercising resulted in lower blood-glucose and insulin levels than consuming an energy bar or glucose beverage containing the same amount of carbohydrate in a study of participants with impaired fasting glucose. The study was published in February 2011 in the "International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism." Impaired fasting glucose, also called prediabetes, is a condition where your blood-glucose levels are usually higher than normal. Improving Blood-Glucose Levels Replacing highly-refined snacks with raisins may help improve your blood-glucose levels. An article published in "Circulation" in September 2009 noted that eating high-sugar, refined-grain snacks like candy bars or chips and soda resulted in higher blood-glucose levels than consuming whole-food snacks like raisins and peanuts or bananas and peanuts, even though they contained similar Continue reading >>

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

If you have diabetes, beware of peanuts, peanut butter, and peanut oil. Some people think that because most tree nuts, like almonds, are so healthy, that peanuts should also be good for us. But peanuts aren’t nuts at all. They are a legume, and unlike most nuts we can’t eat them raw because they are sometimes covered with a dangerous fungus. Actually, we can’t eat them at all if we want to avoid some of the side effects that we can get from them. Some of these side effects can be quite serious. I can think of only nine reasons why we have to avoid peanuts or anything made from them. Maybe you can think of more, but these eight might be enough to give anyone pause: 1. Peanuts have a lot of carbohydrates, which raise our blood sugar level. Take a look at the US Department of Agriculture’s [National Nutrient Database](which is the gold standard of nutrient facts. "One tablespoon of natural, unsweetened peanut butter contains 3 grams of carbohydrate and will raise my blood sugar 15 mg/dl," writes Dr. Richard K. Bernstein in the 2011 edition of his book Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. "Imagine the effect on blood sugar of downing 10 tablespoons!" 2. Peanuts are the source of one of the most common food allergies. "They have the potential to provoke acute allergic reactions (e.g., hives or anaphylaxis) that can be dangerous in the susceptible, even fatal in rare instances," writes Dr. William Davis in his 2011 book, Wheat Belly. Many schools will no longer let children bring peanut butter products to school. 3. Peanuts "contain lectins and other anti-nutrients that can adversely affect your health, particularly if you are suffering from an autoimmune disorder," writes Loren Cordain in his 2002 book, The Paleo Diet. These lectins "are known to increase intestinal Continue reading >>

Are Peanuts Good For Diabetes? Effect On Disease Risk

Are Peanuts Good For Diabetes? Effect On Disease Risk

Peanuts are common in the average American diet in the form of peanut butter, candy bars, and roasted and salted peanuts. But how may eating peanuts affect people with diabetes? People with diabetes have to carefully consider their diet. As a result, many of those with the disease wonder if peanuts are fine to eat. This article explores a few things that people with diabetes should be aware of before making the decision to eat peanuts. Are nuts good for people with diabetes? There is a lot of evidence that suggests nuts, on the whole, are good for the health. According to a study posted in Nutrients, nuts and peanuts are full of nutrients. They are often also rich in healthful substances such as: Studies have linked eating nuts to a lower risk of certain heart diseases and gallstones. They may even help with high blood pressure, cholesterol, and inflammation. While nuts are high in fat and calories, the research suggests that they may even help with weight loss. From this point of view, they are a much healthier option than other snacks, such as a bag of chips. There are some other factors to consider as well, with peanuts specifically. Glycemic index of peanuts The glycemic index (GI) is used to rate foods based on how slow or fast they cause an increase in blood sugar. Foods lower on the GI scale tend to be converted to sugar slowly and steadily. High GI foods release glucose quickly into the bloodstream. People with diabetes are usually more aware of these numbers. They can inform the person if and when they need to take insulin, and what and when they can eat. The GI scale goes from 0-100. Something with a score of 0 would be anything which has no effect on blood sugar, such as water. A score of 100 is pure glucose. The other common measurement is the glycemic load, Continue reading >>

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