diabetestalk.net

Can Diabetics Eat Peanuts And Raisins?

Diabetic Snack & Party Mixes

Diabetic Snack & Party Mixes

Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Every good party needs a tasty snack mix to add a little crunch to the festivities. Here, we provide you with 10 diabetes-friendly options -- many that are low carb -- featuring different flavors in snack mixes, trail mixes, and delicious combinations of rice cereal, nuts, popcorn, and spices that everyone will love. Continue reading >>

7 Health Benefits Of Raisins During Pregnancy

7 Health Benefits Of Raisins During Pregnancy

The moment you learn you are pregnant, your life changes. Some of these changes are pleasant, while others, not so much. One of the biggest changes, apart from your growing body, is the anxiety about the food you eat. Gone are the days of eating without a care. Suddenly, you have to watch each morsel you consume, each drop you drink. That can take the fun out eating. But you need to be careful while pregnant. Now it’s more than just about you and your health. It is also about your baby. So, what foods are okay to eat during pregnancy? There are a number of healthy food options for you to try. Raisin is one of them. Benefits Of Eating Raisins During Pregnancy: Raisins are versatile. You can add them to a number of delicacies, or you can munch on them as they are. These tiny dried fruits have a lot to offer – both to you and to your baby. Here are the major benefits of raisins during pregnancy: A pregnant woman often ends up with anemia due to iron deficiency (1). You need additional sources of iron to provide for your growing baby. Yes, you can use supplements, but isn’t it better to get all your nutrients through food? Raisins contain a lot of iron as well as Vitamin B complex. If you consume raisins during your pregnancy, you can prevent anemia and also treat fatigue and other related symptoms. 2. Eases Constipation: Feeling ‘stuck’ because of constipation? You are not alone! Many women suffer from constipation and other digestive issues during pregnancy (2). You can blame your hormones for it! But the tiny raisins can provide the solution to this often-irritating problem. Raisins contain fiber, which help to make bowel movements easier and smoother. [ Read: Natural Cures For Constipation During Pregnancy ] 3. Increases Appetite: A lack of appetite often plag Continue reading >>

5 Health Benefits Of Eating Peanuts

5 Health Benefits Of Eating Peanuts

Healthy Peanuts What if one drug could help curb your appetite, lower blood pressure, stabilize blood sugar, and decrease your risk for heart disease? You’d take it, right? The inexpensive, accessible and oh-so-easy-to-eat peanut has been shown to do all that and more. Whether your goal is weight loss or better overall health, there are some convincing arguments for including peanuts in your diet on a nearly daily basis. Note: Since peanuts are high in fat, moderation is key here: 1 to 1-½ ounces a day can provide the health benefits outlined here. Editor's Note: We also recognize that peanut allergies are a very real concern for many, as discussed in Peanut Allergies at School. All recommendations here are for those who can safely consume peanuts. 1. Keep your appetite from going nuts Peanuts are a high satiety food, which means they make you feel fuller for longer. In a study published in The Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, participants who snacked on peanuts ate less later. The satiety value of peanuts is not solely a result of their fat, fiber, or protein content, but “from the synergy of all of these components,” said Dr. Richard Mattes, Professor of Nutrition Science at Purdue University. You may also eat less when you have peanuts or peanut butter at breakfast, said Kathy McManus, Director of the Department of Nutrition at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, “Because they have the effectof stabilizing blood sugar, you’re not going to feel hungry as soon.” 3. Reduce your risk of diabetes and control blood sugar One study found that replacing one serving of red meat daily with one serving of peanuts could reduce your risk of diabetes by a whopping 21%. Peanuts can slow the absorption of carbohydrates and, when you eat them in the morning, ca Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

11 Surprising Benefits Of Raisins

11 Surprising Benefits Of Raisins

The health benefits of raisins include treating constipation, acidosis, anemia, fever, and sexual dysfunction. They have also been known to help in weight gain in a healthy way, as well as for their positive impact on eye health, dental care, and bone quality. Health Benefits of Raisins What are Raisins? Raisins are obtained by drying grapes, either in the sun or in driers, which turns the grapes into golden, green or black gems. These delicacies are everyone’s favorites, particularly children. They are widely used in cultural cooking around the world (especially in desserts) and are also added to health tonics, snacks, and compact, high-energy food supplements for mountaineers, backpackers, and campers. Health Benefits of Raisins When the nutritional values and health benefits of raisins are considered, “gems” is an accurate name for them. Let’s see how they help our body; Relieve Constipation When ingested, raisins swell because the fiber present in them shrinks in a dried form, but begins to swell due to the natural fluids. This adds bulk to the food moving through the intestinal tract and ultimately helps provide relief from constipation. The type of fiber in raisins is considered insoluble fiber because it takes in water and gains volume in that way. Besides reducing constipation, they can also help to stop loose stools, again by absorbing its liquid and reducing the frequency and unpredictability of diarrhea. Raisins, like all dried fruits, are very good tools for gaining weight in a healthy way since they are full of fructose and glucose and contain a lot of potential energy. They form an ideal part of a diet for athletes or bodybuilders who need a powerful boost of energy, or for those who want to put on weight without accumulating unhealthy amounts of c Continue reading >>

Is Peanut Butter Good For Treating Low Blood Sugar?

Is Peanut Butter Good For Treating Low Blood Sugar?

A: This is a great question and I’m glad that you asked! When your blood glucose drops too low (usually below 70 mg/dl), you need to “treat” this to help bring your glucose back up to a safe level, which is typically above 80 mg/dl. The best treatment for low blood glucose (also called “hypoglycemia”) is a quick-acting form of carbohydrate. Carbohydrate foods that are digested and absorbed quickly from the intestine into the bloodstream will bring your blood glucose level up quickly. Good examples of low blood glucose treatments are glucose tablets, glucose gels, fruit juice, regular soda, skim milk and raisins. Eating foods that contain mostly protein or fat will not raise your blood glucose and may even prevent your glucose from getting back to a safe level. Peanut butter is an example – it contains mostly fat, some protein and a little bit of carbohydrate (usually from added sugar). Other foods that you should not use to treat a low include chocolate candy bars, nuts, whole milk and cheese. They contain too much fat to effectively raise your blood glucose. Continue reading >>

Can Hamsters Eat / Hamster Safe Food List

Can Hamsters Eat / Hamster Safe Food List

“What Can Hamsters Eat…” is a common question for new and experienced hamster owners alike. This article aims to answer as many of the most popular questions as possible. With any new type of food you plan to feed your hamster, you should research carefully online and take data from a variety of different sources to come to a safe conclusion. When you start feeding your hamster’s new foods, start off by introducing tiny amounts into your hamster’s diet. A good rule to follow is – Never feed man made things like candy and confectioneries. Nature knows best when it comes to animals and food manufacturers use obscene amounts of chemicals and additives that are safe for humans but may not be safe for animals. Disclaimer: DwarfHamsterHome.com is not a vet, nor will be able to provide veterinary advice for any animal. If you are in doubt about feeding your pet certain foods, please seek professional advice. Can Hamsters Eat Carrots Yes, hamsters can have carrots. Carrots are great vegetables for your hamster to eat because they are a non-acidic vegetable with a firm and robust flesh which will help to keep hamsters teeth trim. Carrots are ideal for your hamster nutritionally because they are full of vitamins and minerals that can keep your hamster’s coat in tip-top condition. Some species of Dwarf hamsters are prone to diabetes so you should not give too many sugary foods. Carrots contain a slight amount of sugar (4.7g per 100g) so they should be ok to give as a small treat occasionally for diabetes prone hamsters. Feed carrots to your hamsters sparingly and not every day to prevent stomach upset or watery stools. Can Hamsters Eat Cheese Yes, hamsters can eat cheese as an occasional treat for adult hamsters, but care must be taken to make sure you are feeding yo Continue reading >>

Going Nuts For Peanuts

Going Nuts For Peanuts

Good nut news! A new study showed that eating peanuts or peanut butter with breakfast limited the rise in blood glucose after both breakfast and lunch. This “second-meal” effect was completely unexpected and exciting. This study, “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with high type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. Such a long-distance collaboration couldn’t have happened just a few years ago. It was published in the June 2013 edition of the British Journal of Nutrition. The study not only showed reduced blood glucose levels, but also reduced appetite and food consumption for most of the day in people who ate peanuts or peanut butter. This was based on levels of satiety (fullness) hormones as well as self-reports by the subjects and actual food logs. Not only glucose levels, but nonessential fatty acid levels were lower in the people that ate peanuts or peanut butter. The level of the hormone GLP-1, was higher in the peanut butter group, which is very good news. GLP-1 is the hormone that drugs like exenatide (brand name Byetta) try to mimic. It stimulates insulin production, lowers insulin resistance, and decreases appetite. I knew nuts were good for diabetes, but not this good! On the down side, the subjects did not have diabetes. They were “obese women at high risk for Type 2 diabetes.” So we don’t know yet how much benefit peanuts will give people who already have Type 2. Also, the study was quite small, with only 15 subjects. I’m hoping there will be larger studies, but I’m not holding my breath. There’s not a ton of money in boosting peanuts. The American Peanut Council has some Continue reading >>

Acute Effects Of Raisin Consumption On Glucose And Insulin Reponses In Healthy Individuals

Acute Effects Of Raisin Consumption On Glucose And Insulin Reponses In Healthy Individuals

Go to: Methods Participants Inclusion criteria included men or non-pregnant women aged 18–75 years who were in good health. Individuals with a known history of AIDS, hepatitis, diabetes or a heart condition, or individuals taking medication or with any condition that might make participation dangerous to the individual or affect the results were excluded. A total of ten participants were studied. Using the t distribution and assuming an average CV of within-individual variation of incremental AUC (iAUC) values of 25 %, n 10 participants has 80 % power to detect a 33 % difference in iAUC with two-tailed P < 0·05. Protocol The study was open-label with a partial randomised, cross-over design using standard GI methodology (ISO 26642:2010; International Organization for Standardization). Eligible participants were studied on four separate days over a period of 2–8 weeks with an interval of no less than 40 h and no more than 2 weeks between tests. On each test day, participants came to the clinic in the morning after a 10–14 h overnight fast. Participants were asked to maintain stable dietary and activity habits throughout their participation in the study. If any participant was not feeling well or had not complied with the preceding experimental conditions, the test was not carried out and was rescheduled for another day. On each test occasion participants were weighed, and two fasting blood samples were obtained by finger-stick at 5-min intervals. Finger-stick blood samples were collected from hands warmed with an electric heating pad for 3–5 min before each sample. Blood samples were collected into two separate vials: one (two or three drops of blood) for glucose analysis and the other (between six and eight drops of blood) for insulin. After the second fasting s Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Raisins Eating raisins or other dried fruits may be a better option than snacking on cookies, but it’ll still spike your blood sugar. Why? During the dehydration process, fruits’ natural sugars become very concentrated, causing an unhealthy elevation in blood sugar when they are rapidly absorbed by the body. Just one more reason to stick with whole, fresh fruit options like grapefruit, cantaloupe, strawberries, and peaches. Previous Next More Photos Pancakes and Syrup Fruit Juice Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Raisins

Can Diabetics Eat Raisins

Unlike in the previous years where a diabetic diet had a lot of restrictions, with the advancement in technology and ways to monitor blood sugar levels diabetic people have a wide variety of options on what they can eat. You can eat fruits such as raisins which provide the body with the essential carbohydrates without having to worry about a drastic rise in your blood sugar levels. To ensure that you regulate your blood sugar levels it is advisable to ensure that you take a balanced diet. As much as you are trying to regulate your blood sugar levels and monitoring your carbohydrate intake, it’s a fact the body still needs carbohydrates to provide energy to the cell. Instead of taking a carbohydrate meal you can substitute it with taking raisins which is a fruit rich in carbohydrates, where a single can carbohydrate exchange is equivalent to 2 tablespoons of raisins. For efficiency, you can consider serving raisins as a substitute for other carbohydrate sources in your diet. Glycemic Index Typically, on a glycemic index scale raisins is considered to have a low to moderate glycemic index implying that on taking raisins as part of your diabetic diet, it won’t have a fatal impact on your blood sugar levels. In a general perspective, raisins are small in size and one may be tempted to consume more of it. As a diabetic, to prevent a drastic rise in blood sugar levels takes one at a time. Raisins and diabetes A lot of questions have been raised concerning raisins and whether it is safe to take it while diabetic, with some people claiming that they used to take raisins and have now been diagnosed with diabetes. Well, worry no more; there is good news for you. With scientific prove, raisins is a diabetic diet is totally acceptable and healthy, all you have to do is balance Continue reading >>

Pairing Nuts And Dried Fruit For Cardiometabolic Health

Pairing Nuts And Dried Fruit For Cardiometabolic Health

Abstract Certain dietary patterns, in which fruits and nuts are featured prominently, reduce risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, estimated fruit consumption historically in the U.S. has been lower than recommendations. Dried fruit intake is even lower with only about 6.9 % of the adult population reporting any consumption. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee identified a gap between recommended fruit and vegetable intakes and the amount the population consumes. Even fewer Americans consume tree nuts, which are a nutrient-dense food, rich in bioactive compounds and healthy fatty acids. Consumption of fruits and nuts has been associated with reduced risk of cardiometabolic disease. An estimated 5.5 to 8.4 % of U.S. adults consume tree nuts and/or tree nut butter. This review examines the potential of pairing nuts and dried fruit to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors and focuses on emerging data on raisins and pistachios as representative of each food category. Evidence suggests that increasing consumption of both could help improve Americans’ nutritional status and reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Review Introduction It is well established that certain dietary patterns decrease disease risk and benefit the management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease [1–3]. A substantial body of research demonstrates that diets rich in fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of overweight and obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and hypertension [4, 5]. Fruit and vegetable intakes are, in fact, the only dietary characteristic consistently associated with every conclusion statement across health outcomes in the 2015 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) report [2]. Despite the overwhelming evidence of the health benefits Continue reading >>

Healthy Snacking With Diabetes

Healthy Snacking With Diabetes

Snacks are one of my favorite kinds of meals to eat. Those little meals in between meals to keep your hunger pangs away and to keep your blood sugar levels stable can be a great resource in your diabetes management. They can also make your day extremely difficult if you eat the wrong kind of snack. So what to do? I try to keep my snacking lower carb if I can so it has minimal impact on my meter readings and my waistline. We all know things like string cheese and free veggies are good snack ideas. I have been doing some research (and yes, it was fun and delicious) on some more ideas for foods to grab when you want a quick bite. Not all are low-carb, but they are all delicious, healthy, and diabetes friendly. Wasabi Wow Trail Mix from Trader Joe’s. It’s a blend of wasabi peas, peanuts, almonds, dried cranberries and golden raisins. I love the crunch and how the kick from the wasabi plays with the sweetness of the dried cranberries and raisins. I have been known to devour a whole bag. Maybe that’s not the most diabetes friendly idea, but if you have the handful they recommend, you are only getting 13g of carbohydrates. Not so bad if you ask me. Pepperoni Chips. This is not a new idea to people who are into the low carb thing, but I just picked up on it and am addicted. All you do is place sliced pepperoni on a baking sheet and pop it in a 425 degree oven for 10 minutes. Take them out, and use a paper towel to soak up the grease. Toss them back in the oven for another 2-4 minutes until they are nice and crispy. You can use the “chips” as alternatives to crackers- they are amazing with cheese, in dips, or eat them as is. Which I do all of the time. Roasted Turkey Breast with Cheese. I make these for me and my daughter a lot. Especially when I roast a whole turkey b Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Increase Blood Sugar Levels

5 Foods That Increase Blood Sugar Levels

Common sense dictates that diabetics should avoid cakes, pies and cookies. Since their systems already have difficulty breaking down glucose, eating sugary treats can quickly spike a diabetic's blood sugar level. And that's not good. High levels of glucose, over time, can result in long-term health issues. In reality, most diabetics can have a small pastry from time to time - if they adjust other portions of their food intake and adjust their medicine accordingly, especially if they are insulin-dependent. While the impact of sugary goodies on a diabetic seems apparent, there are other not-so-obvious foods that can also cause blood sugar spikes. hey also contain simple carbohydrates - which the body breaks down into sugar and sends along to the blood stream. A properly functioning pancreas produces insulin that turns the sugar molecule into energy. A diabetic's pancreas, though, either cannot produce enough insulin or none at all. That's why careful consumption of "hidden sugar" foods is an important part of managing a diabetic's care. Here are 5 "hidden sugar" foods that surprisingly contribute to blood sugar issues: White Rice Who doesn't love a favorite chicken dish served over a bed of rice? One cup of cooked white rice, though, packs as many carbohydrates as three slices of white bread. Rice also has very little fiber, which helps keep blood sugar levels constant. White Bread Peanut butter and jelly between two slices of white bread might be a meal of choice for many children. But the white bread can be more of a problem than the jelly for a diabetic. White bread is made from refined flour - which the body turns quickly into sugar and causes rapid blood sugar fluctuations. Pasta and Marinara Sauce Diabetics must be careful when the dinner group votes "Italian". Ther Continue reading >>

​southern Gal Talks Peanuts And Diabetes

​southern Gal Talks Peanuts And Diabetes

The peanut is nature's powerful little nut full of plant-based protein that helps control blood sugar. Individuals with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes must focus their diets on foods that positively affect their glycemic index. Nutritionists and dietitians around the world realize that nutritional management can result in less frequent insulin use and better weight management.1 The glycemic index (GI): a ranking of carbohydrates (1-100) and the higher the rank the worse fluctuation of blood sugar. Peanuts are considered a low glycemic index food at 14 because they are slowly digested and cause sugar to gradually be released into the bloodstream.2 “Peanuts contain not only plant protein (in fact, they are higher in protein than other nuts), but they also contain fiber and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Protein, fiber and fat are important foods for maintaining satiety and supporting normal blood sugar levels; critical factors in weight management and preventing diabetes.”3 This means persons with a family history of diabetes can eat peanuts to help prevent the onset of the disease while ensuring weight management by avoiding overindulgence? Yes! Imagine the joy of learning how helpful Virginia peanuts can be for so many people! As a result of better understanding how peanuts impact diabetes, here is a list of eight possible ways to eat peanuts as way of treatment and prevention: 1.Sprinkle roasted peanuts in your salad in place of croutons 2.Put down the potato chips and grab a handful of Hope and Harmony Cajun peanuts as an evening snack 3.Use salted peanuts to make homemade peanut butter that contains far less sugar than store bought peanut butter 4.Make trail mix using peanuts, raisins, almonds, and whole-wheat cheerios 5.Entertain kids and allow them make peanut covered Continue reading >>

More in diabetes