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Can Diabetics Eat Pastry

Recipes With Phyllo Pastry

Recipes With Phyllo Pastry

Cucumber Bites-Low Carb Snack. Recipes With Phyllo Pastry erratic mealtimes can cause changes in your blood sugar. The Pain Clinic offers consultative services for the diagnosis and management of chronic pain disorders of malignant and nonmalignant sources. insulin reaction or low blood glucose (blood sugar) High Blood Pressure; The genetics of diabetes mellitus syndrome of insulin involved will contribute to better understanding and classification of this group Celiac disease and pediatric type 1 diabetes: diagnostic and treatment what does uncontrolled diabetes do to your body dilemmas. The cost of treating diabetes has risen to more than 2.2m per day official figures have shown Obliterative phlebitis (organized obstruction of veins in association with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration) Type 1 Diabetes In Children Diabetes Treatment Aafp ::The 3 Step Trick that Recipes With Phyllo Pastry Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days.[ Looking for diabetic oat or oatmeal recipes? Diabetic Gourmet Magazine is the If you are a diabetic and you want to get pregnant work Your OB/GYN doctor will usually Recipes With Phyllo Pastry refer you to a dietitian so you can get meal plans that are specially designed to help you control your blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health the chance of heart disease just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Bovine Beta-Casein Antibodies in Breast- and Patients suffering from type 2 diabetes may not benefit from taking both an oral glucose lowering drug (metformin) and insulin instead of insulin alone a study published on bmj. Nonsense mutation in the glucokinase gene causes early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Diet Tips :: Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Diabetes Diet Tips :: Diagnosis Of Gesta Continue reading >>

5 Foods To Avoid

5 Foods To Avoid

Tweet We take a look at 5 types of food which are either best avoided or relegated to occasional eating and not only for people with diabetes. The foods we’ve picked out are particularly relevant to people with diabetes that are carrying extra weight but, as none of us are immune from gaining weight, they have some relevance to us all. We’ve decided not to go with the obvious, i.e. sugary foods as this should be, well, obvious. 5. White bread and other 'white' foods White bread often gets a bad rap and frankly, it’s deserved. White starchy foods, such as white bread and white rice, are digested and converted into glucose very quickly by the body meaning they’re almost as quick to raise blood sugar levels as pure sugar. A regular size white bread roll will usually have around 30g of carbohydrate. This means that having a white bap will raise your blood sugar at a rate close to eating 7 teaspoons of sugar. Healthier alternative - whole grain bread: Whole grain bread should have significantly more fibre than white bread meaning that the carbohydrate gets converted into glucose less quickly. Look out for breads with higher fibre content. 4. Pastries and pastry based foods Pastries, such as pies and sausage rolls, hold a special place in the hearts of many of us but beware, pastries contain a significant amount of carbohydrate but also contain fat which together makes them highly calorific. Pastries are very energy dense foods meaning that even a relatively small portion of the food can contain a large number of calories. A 150g individual steak and onion pie, for example, contains 500 calories on its own so it’s easy to hit half your daily calorie intake in a single meal if you were to include potatoes and gravy. Healthier alternative - stew: A close but lower cal Continue reading >>

Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 11/22/2010 Id be willing to bet that most everyone has been toldand therefore believesthat people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. Its best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you dont miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan . The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same a Continue reading >>

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

You might think a diabetes diagnosis means you’ll have to skip dessert forever. “Not so,” says Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, a certified diabetes educator at DuPage Medical Center in Chicago. “With a little planning, you can satisfy your sweet tooth while keeping your blood sugar under control.” But just how do you do that? There are several ways. Swap Other Carbs for Dessert “Everyone focuses on the sugar, but what’s really important is the total carbohydrates,” says Rondinelli-Hamilton, author of the American Diabetes Association cookbook Healthy Calendar Diabetic Cooking. “If you’d like to have a small piece of pie for dessert, skip the starchy vegetable during dinner,” she says. But she’s quick to point out that this isn’t something you should do on a regular basis. “Desserts and sweets don’t have the nutritional value that other foods do, so it’s best to save them for special occasions,” she says. Think Small Along with limiting how often you have dessert, you’ll also need to limit how much you eat -- and that can be a challenge. “Sugar sets off fireworks in your brain, making you crave more,” says Jessica Bennett, RD, a dietitian at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Fighting the urge to overdo it takes a lot of effort. But there are ways to make it a little easier. “Set yourself up for success by buying desserts that are packaged as a single serving, like a sugar-free fudge pop or a small square of dark chocolate,” Rondinelli-Hamilton says. And be realistic. “If you can’t have cake in the house without eating the whole thing, don’t buy a cake,” she says. When you go out, check the menu for miniature desserts. Many restaurants now offer treats served in small dishes or shot glasses. “If that’s not Continue reading >>

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Get our comprehensive list of the best desserts and sweets for people with diabetes. Having diabetes doesn't mean you can never have dessert again. With some simple swaps and diabetic-friendly dessert recipes, you can satisfy your sweet tooth without sending your blood sugar soaring. Desserts may seem off-limits since many are high in sugar, but remember that for people with diabetes the total number of carbohydrates of a meal or snack matters more than the total sugar. That means dessert can still fit into your diet—with a few adjustments. Before you head to the kitchen, here are a few dessert guidelines and some of our favorite sweets that fit into a diabetic diet. If you opt for something sweet after dinner, you might want to skip the starch at your meal to keep your total carbs in check. But remember that, while exchanging your sweet potato for cheesecake can keep your carb intake steady, you'll lose the fiber, vitamins and other good-for-you nutrients that the sweet potato would provide. It's not a good idea to indulge in dessert every night; instead, enjoy desserts in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most people with diabetes aim for 45-60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Unfortunately, a bakery-sized cookie can contain 60 grams of carbs alone. Choose a smaller portion, and you can still enjoy something sweet without using up your allotted carbohydrates for the meal. One of these Almond Cookies has only 9 grams of carbohydrates. While making desserts with artificial sweeteners can help you cut down on calories and carbs, it's a better idea to try to reduce your total sweetener consumption (from both sugar and noncaloric sources). Because artificial sweeteners are much sweeter than sugar, they may enhance your craving for sweets. They Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning. "Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high." Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says. Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast. However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with type 2 diabetes. Here are some other breakfast mistakes to avoid: Don’t fly on a sugar high. If you don't have a lot of time in the morning for healthy breakfast foods, you may be tempted to wolf do Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Healthy eating is one of the best ways to manage type 2 diabetes. This type of diabetes is strongly linked to excess weight, so calorie reduction and the right kind of diabetes diet can go a long way toward an improvement in overall health. Among the most important components of good nutrition when you have type 2 diabetes are meals with the right mix of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats to keep your blood sugar as normal as possible throughout the day. With these basic building blocks in place, make sure to seek out particular foods and beverages that can give you an extra edge in managing type 2 diabetes, says Beth Reardon, RD, an integrative nutritionist in private practice in Boston and a senior nutrition adviser for Caring.com. Here are some foods to reach for to help you manage your diabetes better. Eat Brown Rice and Other Fiber-Rich Foods White rice has long been known to have a negative effect on blood sugar. Like most "white" foods, it causes blood sugar spikes. A moderate amount of healthy whole grains, such as brown rice, and other fiber-rich foods instead of processed grains may reduce the risk of complications like diabetic neuropathy, which is nerve damage resulting from high blood sugar. Brown rice is packed with fiber, an important component for diabetes management. “Because fiber is not digested by the body, it does not affect blood sugar levels,” Reardon says. “This helps keep blood sugar levels steady and may prevent glucose spikes.” Another way to add fiber to your diet is with beans and other legumes. Research published in April 2012 in Nutrition Journal showed that beans and rice eaten together do not cause as drastic a blood sugar spike as rice alone. Also, a study published in October 2016 in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agricu Continue reading >>

Stacey Harris: The Diabetic Pastry Chef

Stacey Harris: The Diabetic Pastry Chef

Diabetic Living / Community / Success Stories Type 2 diabetes doesn't stop Stacey Harris. From her tasty treats to her outlook on life, this pastry chef keeps things as sweet as can be. See Stacey's story as well as some of her diabetes-friendly pastry dessert recipes. By Jessie Shafer; Recipes by Stacey Harris, PWD type 2 On a typical weekend, Stacey Harris' kitchen is full -- with the sweet, mouthwatering scent of baked goods and lucky friends charged with the task of taste-testing. Her flavor combinations and attention to detail make Stacey's treats so craveable, while her soft voice and gentle smile make this pastry chef just so lovable. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Support , Type 2 , Diabetes Community , Diabetes Management , Diabetes Desserts Stacey's taste for the sweeter things in life led her to leave her career as a mortgage banker to pursue her dream of becoming a pastry chef. But not long after entering culinary school, Stacey was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The thought of leaving desserts and her new career behind was about the worst thing Stacey could imagine. So instead she conjured a smile and baked up some ideas, including a healthier (and still sweet) approach to desserts. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Support , Type 2 , Diabetes Community , Diabetes Management , Diabetes Desserts This gorgeous rolled dessert is perfect for dinner parties and other special get-togethers. Look for Rawtella low-carb chocolate hazelnut spread online at rawtella.com. Made from just three organic ingredients (hazelnuts, cacao nibs, and raw coconut sugar), this creamy spread has 7 grams of carbohydrate per 2 tablespoons. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Support , Type 2 , Diabetes Community , Diabetes Management , Diabetes Desserts Step 1: Pour the meringue batter into a 15x10x Continue reading >>

Flour Power: 5 Options That Are Good For Baking And Diabetes

Flour Power: 5 Options That Are Good For Baking And Diabetes

From whole wheat, to spelt, to almond flour, coconut flour, and even flour made from chickpeas, it's hard to know where to start and easy to become confused about which variety is best for your individual needs. With diabetes, you want to select flour that is slow digested, high in fiber, lower in carbohydrate all without a high level of calories to help maintain blood sugar levels as well as promote a healthy body weight. With all that considered, it may seem easy to just throw your hands up in the air, give up, and resign yourself to never baking again. But don’t worry; I am here to help you sort it out and remove the stress from your next grocery store outing. #1. Whole Wheat Pastry Flour If most of your recipes call for all-purpose flour, refined flour that may elevate blood sugar levels more rapidly than whole grains, you may reach for 100% whole wheat flour as an alternative. Although this switch will certainly boost the fiber and whole grain content of your recipe, the taste and texture may not always remain exactly the same. Whole wheat flour (100%) can have a denser, more course texture than all-purpose flour. As a substitute in breads, it can often work out well, but in baked goods such as cookies and muffins, the final product may not taste as close to the original as you had hoped. Enter whole-wheat pastry flour. This flour, which gives graham crackers their sweet taste, is milled from low-protein soft wheat allowing it to provide a flavorful taste to pastries without the density or coarseness of a standard whole-wheat flour. It is best to use for cookies, piecrusts, and baked goods. A 1/3 cup serving size provides 100 calories, 22 grams of carbohydrate, and 4 grams of fiber. #2. Spelt Flour Another alternative to 100% whole-wheat flour is spelt flour. Spe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dessert

Diabetes And Dessert

Eating desserts with diabetes A popular misconception about diabetes is that it is caused by eating too many sugary foods. While sweets can and do affect your blood sugar, they do not cause you to develop diabetes. However, when you have diabetes, you must carefully monitor your carbohydrate intake. This is because carbohydrates are responsible for raising your blood sugar levels. While you can enjoy sugary foods when you have diabetes, it is important to do so in moderation and with some understanding of how it could impact your blood sugar. This includes sugars found in desserts. 10 Diabetes Diet Myths » When you have diabetes, your body is either not able to use insulin correctly or not able to make any or enough insulin. Some people with diabetes experience both of these issues. Problems with insulin can cause sugar to build up in your blood since insulin is responsible for helping sugar move from the blood and into the body’s cells. Foods that contain carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carbohydrates need to be regulated when you have diabetes to help you manage your blood sugar. On nutrition labels, the term “carbohydrates” includes sugars, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. In desserts, a number of sweet-tasting ingredients can be added to enhance sweetness. While some foods, such as fruits, naturally contain sugars, most desserts have some type of sugar added to them. Many dessert labels will not list “sugar” as a key ingredient. Instead, they will list the ingredient as one or more of the following: dextrose fructose high-fructose corn syrup lactose malt syrup sucrose white granulated sugar honey agave nectar glucose maltodextrin These sugar sources are carbohydrates and will raise your blood sugar. They can be found in cookies, cakes, pies, puddings, ca Continue reading >>

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

When it comes to flours, making the right choice is very important to blood sugar control. So we've gathered some great info here for you to use in your kitchen and menu preparations. Are Grains & Flour Really Good For Fiber? We've often been told that eating whole grains is a great source of fiber. And while ‘whole grains' do provide some fiber they are not the only thing that provide us with our daily fiber needs, vegetables do too. For example: 1 slice of wholewheat bread has 1.9 g of fiber, while a carrot has 2.3 g. All grains and vegetables do range in fiber content, but vegetables are a great source of daily fiber and are also higher in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than grains. So we don't have to eat grains in order to get adequate fiber. Changing A Grain Into A Flour Changes The Way It Affects Blood Sugar Often when we take a grain and make it into flour, it changes the carb and fiber content. So what tends to happen for you as a diabetic is that most types of flours will make your blood sugar spike like wild fire. At least that's what most people experience, which is why our meal plans contain virtually no grain flours at all. An example of this is buckwheat. Eaten whole it has a glycemic index (GI) of around 49, which is a low GI. But take it and turn it into bread and it changes to a GI of 67, meaning it affects your blood sugar more rapidly and more intensely than eating the whole grain itself. Here is another example using wheat. Whole wheat kernals are a very low GI of 30, but we don't tend to eat whole wheat kernals, we eat whole wheat flour and it has an average GI of around 74. Whole Grain Flours Are A Better Option It's true that whole grains are better as far as nutrition goes. As the Minnesota Department of Health explains, the whole grain Continue reading >>

Yes, I Can Eat That | Diabetes Health

Yes, I Can Eat That | Diabetes Health

Sometimes I dont feel like explaining myself. Sometimes I just want to eat a pastry in public in peace, without the diabetes police showing up and giving me their two cents. When that happens, I can usually handle it without my blood pressure rising. I politely explain to these well-meaning people that Im perfectly in control of my diabetes and that as long as I count the carbohydrates and take my shot, I can eat anything I please. Occasionally though, I find myself getting irritated and angry. I get tired of defending myself all the time. For the most part, I eat pretty healthily. I limit fat, calories, carbohydrates, and overly processed items, and I eat high fiber foods and a rainbow of veggies, fruits, and protein. But I enjoy treating myself after my hard work on the treadmill and the weight-training machine. It helps me when I work out to know that somewhere in my future, a gloriously decorated confection awaits. I dont feel that I should have to eat it in private. I shouldnt feel guilty about eating what I want as long as Im careful about my blood sugars. Last year during the holidays, I was actually slapped on the hand for eating a candy cane by a woman volunteering at my work. I was munching away in cheerful holiday peppermint bliss and answering a work-related question when she literally slapped my hand and said Shame on you! Youre a diabetic. My cheeks burned as I told her that I was allowed to eat what I wished as long as I counted the carbohydrates and took my insulin injection. I also informed her that if my blood sugar went low, she would see me downing sugar to correct it so that I didnt end up unconscious and hospitalized. I know she didnt understand, but it isnt right to assume, and it is certainly not okay to slap a person with diabetes. During anoth Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Eat Sweets?

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Eat Sweets?

If you have type 2 diabetes, you can still enjoy holiday treats. Careful carbohydrate counting, a sugar substitute or two, and changes in portion sizes can keep your sweet tooth happy. It's the start of the holiday season, which means lots of candies, cookies, cakes, and other goodies wherever you go. And many people with type 2 diabetes assume that their diagnosis means they must starve their sweet tooth and say no to these seasonal treats. But is that really the case? Happily, say experts, the answer is no — a careful approach to designing your diabetes diet means you don’t have to kiss sweets goodbye. But to be able to enjoy that pumpkin pie or piece of cake without guilt while keeping your blood sugar levels in check, you need to know: What you are eating How much you are eating (portion size) Carbohydrate, sugar, and calorie contents of everything you consume After that, do the math. Your decision to go with a natural sugar or a sugar substitute will depend on your overall carbohydrate and calorie counts as well as your personal taste preference. Carbohydrates are important because they affect your blood sugar control, and many people with diabetes are watching calories in order to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight. Natural Sugars Natural sugars are those that come from plant or animal sources. For example, sugar comes from sugar cane, beet sugar comes from beet roots, and honey is made by honeybees. Other types of natural sugars include: Maple syrup or sugar Agave Turbinado sugar All these sugars contain carbohydrate and calories — and they all can affect your blood sugar levels. Another sweetener, high-fructose corn syrup, is classified by some as a "natural" sugar because it is made from corn, but it is highly processed to give it a longer shelf lif Continue reading >>

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