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Can Diabetics Eat Muffins

Our Best Muffin Recipes & To-go Breakfast Favorites

Our Best Muffin Recipes & To-go Breakfast Favorites

Diabetic Living / Diabetic Recipes / Breakfast Our Best Muffin Recipes & To-Go Breakfast Favorites These healthy muffin recipes are perfect for a diabetic breakfast, plus we threw in breakfast cookies, scones, coffee cake, and breakfast bars to make your mornings even sweeter. Chocolate for breakfast? Yes, please! But don't let the chocolate chips fool you -- these muffins are packed with whole grains and lower-fat ingredients to cut down the calories and carbs. Diabetes Recipes , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Diabetes Breakfasts , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Rather than reaching for a sugary breakfast pastry, plan ahead and bring one of these scrumptiously sweet, protein-packed breakfast cookies to eat instead. Diabetes Recipes , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Diabetes Breakfasts , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Though these apple-and-pumpkin muffin tops are stocked with fall flavors, they're moist and tasty enough to serve all year long. Diabetes Recipes , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Diabetes Breakfasts , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Instead of fat- and cholesterol-filled butter and eggs, this breakfast-cookie recipe calls for peanut butter and potassium-rich bananas. Diabetes Recipes , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Diabetes Breakfasts , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet This dense, chocolaty coffee cake is definitely a companyworthy breakfast bread. Serve at your next brunch, buffet, or book club. This recipe can also be made with a gluten-free baking mix. Diabetes Recipes , Popular Diabetic Recipes , Diabetes Breakfasts , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Zucchini is a great addition to any baked good -- and it's an easy way to get your family to unknowingly eat their veggies! Enjoy these flavorful scones with a cup of cof Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 11/22/2010 Id be willing to bet that most everyone has been toldand therefore believesthat people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. Its best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you dont miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan . The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same a Continue reading >>

Had A Corn Muffin And Paid For It

Had A Corn Muffin And Paid For It

I have been known to eat something I shouldn't and then get upset when my #'s soar. Today with breakfast out I had to have a yummy looking corn muffin. I knew I shouldn't but I was weak minded. Anyway I went to a boardwalk fair in extreme heat here on Long Island and thought.....hmmmm my bs will go down because I walked off the bs. Usually that does it - but when I got home I was 210. I flipped out. I know I deserved it but normally after a cheat, and then with some walking my numbers go lower. Today not. But weirdly enough, after I lied down for a while I took the bs again and I was at 124. Could you explain how this happened? I was sure I was still going to be in the 200's. Thanks. And btw, you could yell at me for the corn muffin. I have already yelled at myself but I know it could happen again D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Most likely it had sugar, corn and then grain. If I have ever tried that in the past I get well into the 200s even if I use insulin. Those are just to hard to judge whats in it other than the ingredients but how much of what. How long did you lay down, its possible that might have been long enough to have a lower reading. Same thing happened to me last Thanksgiving when I made cornbread pudding. I just had to eat some knowing what corn or anything to do with corn does to my sugar but it was good. So good. First of all don't blame yourself. It is the diabetes. I know on vacation I was away from my normal low carb kitchen. So I had to eat whatever I could at breakfast buffets. So I found myself eating yogurts and even a croissant here and there. I also walked all over the place, probable 5-10 miles a day but my bgs were still high, especially my morning bgs. I would gather the reason your bgs came down was because your Phase 2 insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning. "Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high." Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says. Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast. However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with type 2 diabetes. Here are some other breakfast mistakes to avoid: Don’t fly on a sugar high. If you don't have a lot of time in the morning for healthy breakfast foods, you may be tempted to wolf do Continue reading >>

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

I ate the skinny girl inside of me. I was hungry. You know, dieters like to eat their smoothy in the morning and be done with it. Or maybe that cereal with low fat milk. Great! Good for you! Diebetics are NOT Dieters. And if I have to post till I am blue in my face and call me Smurfette, I am going to get that through to you! Yes YOU. The Diabetic who thinks that if they just lose weight all will be well. That if they just have that small shake for breakfast like those commercials tell you to do..you will be a-ok and skinny in no time! You think your pancreas actually needs to lose weight? Well? Do ya'? Yes, nuts and whole grains like rolled oats are good for you in small portions but unfortunately not when they're tossed with loads of sugar and dried fruit ... 1 cup of lowfat granola with raisins (98g carbs) with 1/2 cup of fat free milk (6g carbs) Yogurt is undeniably a healthy food, but you have to choose the unsweetened, full-fat variety to get the benefits and keep carbs low. And toast and English muffins, even if you opt for whole grain, are high in carbs, so it's always best to eat just half or skip entirely. 1 cup of fat free, fruit flavored yogurt (47g carbs) with 1 whole wheat English muffin (27g) and 1 tbsp fruit preserves (14g) Picture this: A beautiful person sitting in a trendy coffee shop, eating a delicious-looking, oversized, low fat bran muffin and a skim latte, munching on just a little plate of no-fat red grapes. Now, check out the nutrition facts below, and picture that person's blood sugar two hours later! On the surface, a smoothie could be a good thing. Put some fruit and yogurt together and blend it up -- what could be so wrong with that? And there are some relatively good, lower carb smoothie recipes out there, but the vast majority contain hu Continue reading >>

Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fatparticularly unhealthy fatsare problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Best and Worst Foods for People With Diabetes The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Best and Worst Foods for People With Diabetes Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor ch Continue reading >>

Diabetes Association Recommends A Sugar Breakfast October 20, 2015health News

Diabetes Association Recommends A Sugar Breakfast October 20, 2015health News

Let me be blunt, don’t take nutrition advice from the government or the American Diabetes Association. We have been told by doctors and the government to build our diet around bread, grain and cereal. These carbohydrates are basically the same as simple sugar in your bloodstream because they rapidly breakdown in your body to sugar. If you follow the USDA guidelines and eat 60% carbohydrates, on a 2,200 calorie diet this equals about 2 cups of sugar per day (Protein Power, Eades M.D.). What does the American Diabetes Association tell diabetics to eat for breakfast? The ADA recommends your breakfast plate and every meal include 25% starchy foods and fruit (including corn, rice, potatoes, tortillas and pasta). What is wrong with this food advice from the government and the American Diabetes Association? Almost everything! On their website they used to say, “The biggest dietary risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes is simply eating too much and being overweight. Your body doesn’t care if the extra food comes from cookies or beef, it is gaining weight that is the culprit.” Now, they have removed that foolish statement and replaced it with this dinosaur nutrition advice, “Remember, the bottom line on dieting is that the only way to cut pounds is to consume fewer calories than you burn.” More ADA Bad Advice: Eat Bread and Cereal You can find bad advice and recommendations to eat bread and cereal on the ADA website page for Quick Breakfast Ideas. Eat whole wheat bread or English Muffins (ADA Bad Advice) Sara Lee “Heart Healthy Homestyle 100% Whole Wheat” will turn into 5 tsp of sugar per slice and Packed with GMO High Fructose Corn Syrup, GMO Soy/Corn ingredients and preservatives Ditto for English Muffins like Thomas 100% Whole Wheat English Muffins GMO co Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Muffins For Breakfast?

Muffins For Breakfast?

You have probably heard this message before: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But it is important to understand why, especially if you live with diabetes. “Starting your day off with breakfast fuels your body and helps you meet your nutritional requirements for the whole day,” says Stephanie Boutette, a registered dietitian and education coordinator with the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA). “Skipping breakfast can cause you to overeat at lunchtime, or lead you to eat those less healthy food cravings mid-morning. For people with diabetes, it’s really important to have consistent meals to help regulate blood sugar.” Reviews of observational studies found that adults who skip breakfast are more likely to have a higher BMI or to be overweight or obese than adults who eat breakfast. Consuming breakfast is also associated with a lower degree of weight gain over time. The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada (CDA Guidelines): recommend that breakfast (or any meal) should include foods from any three out of the four food groups in Canada’s Food Guide—vegetables and fruit, cereals and grains, milk and alternatives, and meat and alternatives. “The body needs an adequate amount of carbohydrates, fibre, healthy fat, protein, vitamins, and minerals,” says Boutette. “You can get that by making sure to incorporate a variety of foods.” “For a balanced breakfast that includes a muffin, have it with an apple and some cheese, or some nut butter and a glass of milk.” – Stephanie Boutette, registered dietitian and education coordinator, Canadian Diabetes Association Make it whole grain When it comes to easy, healthful, and tasty options, how do muffins—with th Continue reading >>

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

The smell of a freshly baked bread, or the sight of bread, is enough to send your senses reeling. Though people with diabetes should eat bread in moderation, sometimes it can be easy to get carried away. After all, bread is one of the most popular foods all over the globe. Just because you have diabetes, it doesn’t mean that you have to miss out on all the great bread that life has to offer. In order to be able to eat bread if you have diabetes, there are a few things that you will need to know. Sonya’s Story Sonya sat across from me. She looked defeated. She hung her head low. “I don’t know how I’ll ever give up bread,” she said. “It’s my favorite food. Now that I have Type 2 Diabetes, I know I can’t eat bread, rice, or pasta.” “You can have bread, rice, and pasta in small amounts. I can teach you which kind of breads are best for you, so that you can get some of your favorite food,” I said. “That would be great,” said Sonya. “Wow, I feel a lot better! When can I come to class and learn about this?” “You can come tomorrow,” I said. “I’ll find you some bread recipes that you can make at home with diabetes-friendly ingredients, so that the bread you do eat is healthier. It will also be lower in carbohydrates than some other breads, and the carbohydrates will be good carbohydrates.” Sonya came to class where she learnt valuable information about making diabetes-friendly breads. Now she makes them for herself, and a few other friends with diabetes that she happened to have met in her diabetes classes. Breads with high fibers Breads that are whole grain, and high in fiber, such as oats or bran, are the best type of bread for people with diabetes to eat. While you can have a serving or two of bread, you still need to stay within the Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

Dangerfood: Bran Muffins

Dangerfood: Bran Muffins

Bran muffins look like a healthier option in the pastry case, but are they really? While most of the ingredients may offer some health benefits, the problem is that most bran muffins sold in stores and restaurants pack in loads of calories that can wreak havoc on the waistline — and make it awfully hard to fend off that muffin top (not the yummy kind). Bran Damage — Why It’s Dangerous Photo by Caitlin Covington Bran, the outer layer of grains such as oat, rice, and wheat, does have some great benefits: It's rich in fiber, omega, starch, protein, vitamins and dietary minerals. One serving (about a third of a cup) contains 14 percent of the recommended daily dose of protein and 28 percent of the recommended daily intake of dietary fiber. Some studies show oat bran may also lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared to other types of bran, including from wheat . Bread products containing oat bran may also be helpful in controlling diabetes, since studies show it could help control the body’s response to sugar, lessening the body's glycemic response (or how much insulin the body releases to deal with the carbohydrates in food) . So what's the problem with today’s bran muffins — and most muffins in general? They may be made with healthy ingredients, but the real culprit is portion size. Many muffins sold in stores and restaurants are massive, topping out at more than 350 calories each! That’s just as many as some popular types of cream-filled doughnuts. In fact, popular chain Dunkin Donuts' Honey Bran Raisin muffin clocks in at a whopping 440 calories, while their classic Bavarian Kreme donut is a (comparatively measly) 270 calories. Some bran muffins made with butter and oil contain high amounts of saturated fat, which might have their own health Continue reading >>

Fit 5 On Friday: Top 5 English Muffins

Fit 5 On Friday: Top 5 English Muffins

Okay, is it really necessary to have nearly 20 varieties of English Muffins to choose from in the bread section? No, but there are almost that many! Who cares you ask? I do. As a dietitian I get very annoyed by some of the marketing, or lack there of, to educate consumers on why one type of bread product might be healthier, or tastier for any particular reason. There isnt any sort of signage of language that helps decipher the difference between all the varieties for the average consumer to know why they are even choosing one type over another for. Yes, the packaging is clear in that it states 100 Calories or Whole Grains, Double Fiber, or 10 Grain, but when you turn them around to look at the nutrition facts label, if you even do, what does it all mean for someone trying to eat either lower carb for their blood sugar or eat higher fiber and healthy grains for a heart healthy diet. My husband and I are sort of addicted to English Muffins. We literally eat them every single morning for breakfast. He prefers peanut butter on his (I buy the Omega-3 added PB or the low-fat and he doesnt even taste the difference). I prefer mine with a dab of butter and some jelly or with an egg and slice of cheese. I thought it might be helpful to share with you the Top 5 English Muffins that will benefit your blood sugars (being that they are higher in fiber and lowerin total carbohydrates) as well as those with the least amount of fat. If you arent an English Muffin fan, or if you believe that any of the varieties that promise low-calorie or high-fiber wont offer taste, please try some! You wont even notice the difference, I swear! Now, keep in mind I have no connection to any English Muffin brands or companies that produce English Muffins, this is just a particular food that I am fond o Continue reading >>

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