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Can Diabetics Eat Miso Soup

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar For Type 2 Diabetics

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar For Type 2 Diabetics

Diabetes is a serious health condition which involves an inability of the body to naturally regulate its blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, which usually comes later in life, occurs when the body either doesn't produce insulin or cannot recognize its production of insulin, an important hormone that moves glucose from the bloodstream to the cells where it is needed. When blood sugar builds up too high in the bloodstream, diabetics become at risk for serious side effects like neuropathy, heart disease and eye problems. There are medications to help reduce dangerously high blood sugar levels in diabetics, but luckily, several healthy foods can also reduce blood sugar levels. Video of the Day Chicken breasts are a healthy choice for type 2 diabetics who want to lower their blood sugar levels. According to the journal "Nutrition and Metabolism," foods which are high in dietary protein, such as chicken breasts, decrease blood sugar levels while at the same time increasing the secretion of insulin so that the body can move blood glucose (blood sugar) into the cells. The nutritional database CalorieKing.com states that a full 6.1 ounce chicken breast contains 53.4 g of protein, but no carbohydrates, which can increase blood sugar levels. There are two distinct yet important benefits of eating walnuts when it comes to lowering blood sugar levels. The high fat content in walnuts slows down the absorption of carbohydrates so that blood sugar levels rise more slowly, according to "Nutrition and Metabolism." The journal also states that dietary fat can increase insulin production, which can in turn lower blood glucose. Additionally, the fiber content of walnuts may help to negate the effect that carbohydrates have, raising blood sugar levels, states the Joslin Diabetes Center. Cal Continue reading >>

The Effects Of The Habitual Consumption Of Miso Soup On The Blood Pressure And Heart Rate Of Japanese Adults: A Cross-sectional Study Of A Health Examination

The Effects Of The Habitual Consumption Of Miso Soup On The Blood Pressure And Heart Rate Of Japanese Adults: A Cross-sectional Study Of A Health Examination

The Effects of the Habitual Consumption of Miso Soup on the Blood Pressure and Heart Rate of Japanese Adults: A Cross-sectional Study of a Health Examination 1Department of Medical Informatics, Japan Community Health care Organization, Kyushu Hospital, Japan 2Department of Health Examination, Japan Community Health care Organization, Kyushu Hospital, Japan 3Department of Cardiology, Japan Community Health care Organization, Kyushu Hospital, Japan Correspondence to Dr. Koji Ito, [email protected] The Internal Medicine is an Open Access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. To view the details of this license, please visit ( ). Objective It is recommended that middle-aged and elderly individuals reduce their salt intake because of the high prevalence of hypertension. The consumption of miso soup is associated with salt intake, and the reduced consumption of miso soup has been recommended. Recent studies have demonstrated that the consumption of miso soup can attenuate an autonomic imbalance in animal models. However, it is unclear whether these results are applicable to humans. This study examined the cross-sectional association between the frequency of miso soup consumption and the blood pressure and heart rate of human subjects. Methods A total of 527 subjects of 50 to 81 years of age who participated in our hospital health examination were enrolled in the present study and divided into four groups based on the frequency of their miso soup consumption ([bowl(s) of miso soup/week] Group 1, <1; Group2, <4; Group3, <7; Group4, 7). The blood pressure levels and heart rates of the subjects in each group were compared. Furthermore, a multivariable analysis was performed to determine whether Continue reading >>

The 7 Best Probiotic Foods For Diabetes

The 7 Best Probiotic Foods For Diabetes

David Mendosa | Aug 17, 2015 Nov 13, 2016 Probiotic foods are fermented, but not all fermented foods are probiotic. Beer and wine are fermented but arent probiotic, which most of the scientific community defines as live microorganisms that can confer a health benefit . Just about all cuisines include probiotic foods because they preserve and enhance food by harnessing the benefits of good bacteria and yeast. They populate our digestive tract and help us break down our food. Sauerkraut comes from Eastern European and Germanic cuisines and in German means sour cabbage. If you dont make it at home, get raw sauerkraut from a refrigerated case of your market; pasteurization kills good and bad bacteria. Raw sauerkraut is low in carbs and can have 15 different species of good bacteria . If you like spicy foods, you may prefer kimchi to its milder cousin, sauerkraut. Kimchi the national dish of both South and North Korea and sauerkraut rank among the very best probiotic foods for people with diabetes. They are the lowest in carbohydrates and calories of any of these foods while having lots of fiber. Usually made from napa cabbage and seasonings, kimchi comes as a side dish at almost every Korean meal . Good yogurt from our markets adds active cultures after pasteurization and has nothing else but milk. It actually has only one-third of the carb content stated on the Nutrition Facts label. Fermentation converts lactose, the sugar in milk, into lactic acid, which doesnt raise our blood sugar levels and isnt a carbohydrate. Greek yogurt and Middle Eastern labneh, which are strained, are even better, because straining removes even more lactose. Kefir is the liquid cousin of yogurt , coming to us from the north Caucasus Mountains of Eurasia. Thick, creamy, and tangy, kefir has as m Continue reading >>

Miso

Miso

The George Mateljan Foundation is a not-for-profit foundation with no commercial interests or advertising. Our mission is to help you eat and cook the healthiest way for optimal health. Miso is typically considered to be a high-sodium food, since one teaspoon of miso often contains 200-300 milligrams of sodium. However, recent research has shown that in spite of its high-sodium content, miso does not appear to affect our cardiovascular system in the way that other high-sodium foods sometimes can. In recent animal studies, for example, identical concentrations of salt (sodium chloride) obtained from miso versus table salt were discovered to have very different impacts on blood pressure. High-salt diets that derived their high salt level from table salt raised blood pressure in these animal studies, but high-salt diets that derived their high salt from miso did not. Recent human studies on miso intake among Japanese adults have also shown that miso-containing diets tend to lower risk of cardiovascular problems, despite the high-salt content of miso. Reasons for this unique relationship between miso and our cardiovascular system are not yet clear. However, some researchers have speculated that the unique soy protein composition of miso (including peptide building-blocks of protein that get formed from soy proteins when the beans are fermented) is one of the key reasons for the cardiovascular support provided by miso. Since miso is seldom eaten alone, other cardio-supportive foods in miso soups and miso stir-fries might also play an important role in these research findings. Some of the health benefits provided by soy foods depend on the ability of bacteria or other micro-organisms to break down two of the soy's isoflavones - daidzein and genisteininto related compounds (f Continue reading >>

Why Miso Is Incredibly Healthy

Why Miso Is Incredibly Healthy

Written by Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA) on June 17, 2017 Miso is a fermented condiment especially popular in parts of Asia, though it has also made its way to the Western world. Although miso is still unknown to many, individuals who are familiar with it have most likely consumed it in the form of Japanese miso soup. It's incredibly nutritious and linked to a variety of health benefits, including better digestion and a stronger immune system. This traditional Japanese condiment consists of a thick paste made from soybeans that have been fermented with salt and a koji starter. The starter usually contains the Aspergillus oryzae fungus. Miso paste can be used to make sauces, spreads and soup stock , or to pickle vegetables and meat. People generally describe its flavor as a combination of salty and umami (savory), and its color can vary between white, yellow, red or brown, depending on variety. Although miso is traditionally made from soybeans, certain varieties use other types of beans or peas. Other ingredients may also be used to make it, including rice, barley, rye, buckwheat and hemp seeds, all of which affect the color and flavor of the final product. Summary: Miso is a paste made from fermented soybeans often mixed with other ingredients. It's a versatile condiment available in many varieties. Miso contains a good amount of vitamins, minerals and beneficial plant compounds. One ounce (28 grams) generally provides you with ( 1 ): It also contains smaller amounts of B vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, selenium and phosphorus, and is a source of choline ( 1 , 2 ). Interestingly, the varieties made from soybeans are considered to be sources of complete protein because they contain all the essential amino acids needed for human health ( 1 ). Moreover, the fermentation pr Continue reading >>

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

People around the world are eating low-carbohydrate diets to treat their diabetes. But all plant foods, other than seeds, are carbs. So what can you eat? Is it all animal products, or are there other options? We know the arguments against eating carbs. Other than fiber, carbs are either sugars or starches that break down into sugars. Since people with diabetes have little to no effective insulin, which is necessary for handling sugars (glucose), they probably shouldn’t eat them. But is this argument totally true? Perhaps not. Vegans and vegetarians tend to eat a lot of carbs, and many of them seem to do quite well with diabetes. Many people in poor countries who cannot afford meat also have relatively low rates of diabetes. So what’s their secret? What are they eating? It seems clear that the successful ones eat very low amounts of refined sugars and simple starches. They may have small amounts of truly whole grains (not stuff that is marketed as “whole grain” but is actually highly processed). They eat small amounts of fruits and starchy vegetables. (Diabetic low-carb guru Dr. Richard Bernstein says he hasn’t eaten a piece of fruit in decades.) What’s left? Well, from a carb standpoint, you can eat as much animal food, like meat and eggs, as you want. They don’t have any carbs (although dairy products do). You can vary that with sea animals — they don’t contain carbs either. There are probably a few health risks from eating so much meat. Your toxic load will be higher, unless you consistently eat organic free-range meat and wild-caught, small fish. You might get too much fat if you overdo it, but advocates like Bernstein have found no problems for themselves or their patients. However, from the standpoint of your wallet, the animals, and the planet, e Continue reading >>

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (GDM) can sometimes make you feel like you’re missing out. Missing out on a casual snack, a rich and creamy meal, that extra soda or that piece of cake you’ve been coveting. And GDM comes about at a time in your pregnancy when you’re probably tired and want to indulge a little. Annoyingly GDM is there, shaking its head at you, ordering you to put down the hot chips and put your hands where it can see them. By now, after looking through GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com, hopefully you’ll have noticed that there is in fact a whole lot of delicious food you can eat despite how you felt after your initial diagnosis. And yes, cooking with GDM does take planning and some re-thinking your approach to food, but once you understand the basics you’ll feel empowered and hungry! So managing your meals in the ‘safety’ of you own kitchen is all well and good, but what happens when you want to eat out or order in? Here are some helpful tips for approaching these kinds of meals. Article written by Lisa Taylor (GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com founder) and Natasha Leader (Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator and GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com In-Kitchen Dietitian) “Surely it’s okay just this once…” It’s tricky to say just how often eating out should be done. It depends on the quality of what you’re eating and your overall health. When you’re pregnant there is more to think about from a food safety perspective, which can reduce your options and can in turn push you towards not so healthy options – unless you plan carefully. Food prepared outside the home is more likely to be higher in sodium (salt) and unhealthy fats compared to what you might make at home and this has implications for general health in the long t Continue reading >>

What Makes Miso So Incredibly Healthy?

What Makes Miso So Incredibly Healthy?

Miso is a fermented condiment especially popular in parts of Asia, though it has also made its way to the Western world. Although miso is still unknown to many, individuals who are familiar with it have most likely consumed it in the form of Japanese miso soup. It's incredibly nutritious and linked to a variety of health benefits, including better digestion and a stronger immune system. This traditional Japanese condiment consists of a thick paste made from soybeans that have been fermented with salt and a koji starter. The starter usually contains the Aspergillus oryzae fungus. Miso paste can be used to make sauces, spreads and soup stock , or to pickle vegetables and meat. People generally describe its flavor as a combination of salty and umami (savory), and its color can vary between white, yellow, red or brown, depending on variety. Although miso is traditionally made from soybeans, certain varieties use other types of beans or peas. Other ingredients may also be used to make it, including rice, barley, rye, buckwheat and hemp seeds, all of which affect the color and flavor of the final product. Summary: Miso is a paste made from fermented soybeans often mixed with other ingredients. It's a versatile condiment available in many varieties. Miso contains a good amount of vitamins, minerals and beneficial plant compounds. One ounce (28 grams) generally provides you with ( 1 ): It also contains smaller amounts of B vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, selenium and phosphorus, and is a source of choline ( 1 , 2 ). Interestingly, the varieties made from soybeans are considered to be sources of complete protein because they contain all the essential amino acids needed for human health ( 1 ). Moreover, the fermentation process used to produce miso makes it easier for the bo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Anyone Have A Meal Plan They Can Send Me?

Gestational Diabetes - Anyone Have A Meal Plan They Can Send Me?

Gestational Diabetes - Anyone Have A Meal Plan They Can Send Me? Come and join us on Facebook and Twitter . The BellyBelly forums are now closed. Join the official BellyBelly Facebook community for support and advice, and visit the BellyBelly website for awesome information! Gestational Diabetes - Anyone Have A Meal Plan They Can Send Me? I was borderline GD last pregnancy and have been feeling like absolute crap for a couple of weeks. Will do a test tomorrow but am pretty sure I have it. Feel very thirsty, knackered and close to blacking out. So ... I know that I'm meant to avoid bread, pasta, rice, potatoes and normally I would sit down, go through recipe books and work some stuff out. But we're pretty busy right now - in the middle of moving house, planning renos to new house etc. etc. and I have SPD to deal with as well. So if anyone has a meal plan with specific suggestions on what to eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner, I would be hugely grateful if you could send it to me so I don't have to figure it out for myself. I know porridge for brekkie is good and meat and veg for dinner is good, I just want something more specific than that. I know that everyone experiences different foods that cause issue but this is pretty much what I survived on. I was just over the threshold by 0.1 and managed to keep my blood sugars under the limits for the entire pg and I felt heaps better too. Breaky - porridge, with fruit and some cinnamon (used sultanas/blueberries/pears) - tinned fruit (in juice not syrup) with Jalna (any natural) yoghurt or the Diet brand Lunches - soups with 1 slice of bread (I stuck with minestrone and chick/corn) - tuna/avo/lettuce sandwich or same with chicken - salad with tuna/chicken small wholegrain roll - steamed gyoza/dumplings with a miso soup Dinners Continue reading >>

Is Miso Soup Healthy For You?

Is Miso Soup Healthy For You?

Nicki Wolf has been writing health and human interest articles since 1986. Her work has been published at various cooking and nutrition websites. Wolf has an extensive background in medical/nutrition writing and online content development in the nonprofit arena. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English from Temple University. A bowl of fresh miso soup.Photo Credit: olgakr/iStock/Getty Images Eat at a Japanese restaurant and you will likely get a bowl of miso soup with your meal. This hot soup pairs a Japanese soup stock called dashi in which you dissolve miso, a fermented bean paste, with bits of tofu, chopped scallion and sometimes seaweed or kelp. Miso soup is a low-calorie food for most people, but it is high in sodium, so keep your portions small. A 1-cup portion of miso soup contains 66 calories; this amount is not enough for a full meal in most cases even if you follow a calorie-restricted diet, although miso soup can be a course served as part of a lunch or dinner. This soup is low in fat -- 1 g per serving -- helping you to keep your fat intake to 20 to 35 percent of the calories in your daily meal plan. One serving of miso soup also contains 5 g of carbohydrates, 1 g of fiber and 2 g of protein. One serving of miso soup has 4 g of sugar. That may not seem like a lot, but it contributes to the average daily consumption of 22.2 tsp. of sugar per day by Americans. Avoid ingesting more than 25 to 37.8 g of sugar per day to avoid gaining weight, developing heart disease and getting cavities. Including miso soup in your diet may help you lose weight. The seaweed often used in miso soup caused a 5 to 10 percent weight loss in animal studies thanks to a compound in the seaweed called fucoxanthin that has an effect on abdominal fat. While more studies are neede Continue reading >>

Miso Soup Is The Cheapest, Easiest Vegan Breakfast

Miso Soup Is The Cheapest, Easiest Vegan Breakfast

In the United States, miso soup is generally considered little more than a side dish for sushi. But in Japan, people commonly eat miso soup for breakfast . It's a meal dating back centuries, and though there are many variations on the type of miso soup eaten at breakfast , it's low-key the cheapest, easiest vegan breakfast you can make in the morning. Yes, I said vegan , even though, at its most traditional, miso soup isn't technically vegan. That's because the soup base is dashi, a simple yet savory broth that's made by boiling dried kelp and bonito flakesand these dried, fermented slivers of fish that are decidedly not vegan. But if you're looking for the cheap, easy and vegan recipe for miso soup , simply skip the bonito flakes. You don't even really need to use the dried kelp, called wakame , if you're really looking to cut steps and ingredients. (It should be noted here, though, that a package of the stuff is also available on Amazon for a very reasonable $4.50, and using it doesn't add too much extra time to the recipe.) Miso soup makes for an admittedly simple breakfast, but that's part of the appeal, especially since easy doesn't have to mean unhealthy. This soup also packed with protein , thanks to all the soybeans, and that'll help keep you full until lunch. Plus, miso itself is a good source of copper, manganese, vitamin K, protein, and zincall necessary nutrients in a balanced vegan diet . You can even add whatever leftover vegetables you might have on hand, like mushrooms, snow peas, even carrots and potatoes, for some extra fiber and flavor. Miso soup is filling, delicious, and even portable if you need it to be. (Seriously. Just pour it into a to-go mug before you walk out the door.) It's also cost-effective. You can order over a pound of miso paste on A Continue reading >>

Miso Soup And Fermented Food

Miso Soup And Fermented Food

You are here: Home Forums Welcome to the BSD Miso soup and fermented food Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total) Hello, Ive been reading more and more about the importance of gut health and am thinking of introducing some fermented food into our diet. So I bought some miso, white the packet says but it looks more ochre to me. Trouble is I dont really know what to do with it! Please can someone point me inthe direction of a soup recipe without any exotic ingredients? I live in France and round here pak choi is about as exotic as we get (without a drive) Im also interested in making kimchitheres an easy recipe on the BBC good food page which Im going to try. As Ive always avoided preserving food for fear of botulism, this is really going to take me out of my comfort zone!! I would love any suggestions, pointers or favourite recipes (easy ones) that anyone would like to share. I know there are a few fermentation fans on these boards Hey Angela06 you can make a very simple soup, simply by putting a generous teaspoon of paste in a cup and adding hot water. If you want to make something more complex, you could get some dried seaweed online and crumble some into the soup, or make a soup in a pan adding finely chopped spring onion as well cook just long enough to soften the onion. I tried making kimchi, but wasnt over impressed with the results, might have been something I didnt do right, although I have tried buying kimchi as well and wasnt too keen on that either prefer sauerkraut. I do make kefir, which is something you can make at home, once you have some grains you can get these online. Once you have them, they keep going and going I always have more than I need! You can also make live yogurts, although again you need to have a starter culture for that as well. Hope y Continue reading >>

The Solution To The Problem Of Diabetes

The Solution To The Problem Of Diabetes

Chances are, your life has been touched in some way by diabetes. You may have had a short bout of gestational diabetes while pregnant, you may know a friend or relative who suffers from it or you may have diabetes yourself. In fact, the World Health Organization states that the number of people who suffer from diabetes worldwide has risen from 108 million people in 1980 to 422 million people in 2014: 8.5% of the adult population. Diabetes is no joke: though high blood sugar may seem like a small thing, diabetes is a chronic disease that is debilitating and degenerative over time. It often results in serious health issues including blindness, nerve damage, ulcers and infection, and eventually even heart attacks and stroke. Diabetes can literally kill you. Our bodies operate under an intricate balancing act of hormones, nutrients and signals that tell the body how to respond to stimuli and how to operate most efficiently. Insulin is a hormone that plays a key part in almost all the bodys processes, beginning with mealtime. Insulin is produced when we eat, and more is produced when we eat foods that produce glucose, or sugar, in the blood. High carbohydrate, sweet and processed foods all garner a larger insulin response than other foods. Insulin regulates our bloods sugar levels, which in turn regulate energy expenditure or fat storage. When too much insulin is produced because of too much sugar in the diet over time, our bodies are unable to generate a proper insulin response, and diabetes is born. Historically, diabetes has not been on the scene for very long. 200 years ago diabetes (or any form of high blood sugar disease) was virtually unheard of. So how did we get to a place where almost 1 in 10 people all over the world suffer? A very interesting correlation can be Continue reading >>

Tell Me All You Know About Miso Soup - The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online

Tell Me All You Know About Miso Soup - The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online

Miso soup is easy to make! Easier if you have access to an Asian food market? There are many types of miso pastes, If there are many varieties, I'd get the red miso paste. It is a nice all-purpose type. As for seaweed, if they sell a nice big bag of wakame seaweed, you can just break off a small chunk, soak it and then chop it up to use in the soup. As for the soup base, the easiest is to use Hondashi, which is the granulated version of the stock. Add to boiling water, add miso paste, seaweed and tiny chunks of tofu, and you're set! OR, if you can locate these ingredients, you can make dashi using a piece of kombu (flat large seaweed) and bonito flakes (thin dried flakes of fish). Bring water to boil, add kombu slice and a handful of bonito flakes. Cover and remove from heat. Strain after 10 minutes of steeping. Thanks loads, Grace! I'm very glad to hear from one who's made it before! In lieu of an Asian grocery, I've scoped out a couple of online Japanese markets: mitsuwa.com and marukaiestore.com, and as long as I can get the right ingredients, I think I can do this just fine. I've taken note that the miso paste should go in at the last minute and not be allowed to boil, right? It can get 'grainy' if it boils? Ooh, Mitsuwa is a good one. And yup, miso paste goes in last, after you've moved the soup from the heat. If you have a small strainer, you can use that. Put a spoonful of miso in the mesh strainer and mash it into the soup. It will get grainy either way, but miso will lose its nutritional properties if boiled, hence putting it in when the soup is ready. I love the stuff and am thinking of making my own - from what I've read, it's traditionally eaten for breakfast in Japan, and soup for breakfast sounds good to me! I've researched the ingredients - discovered th Continue reading >>

Miso Soup Recipe - Allrecipes.com

Miso Soup Recipe - Allrecipes.com

It's better taste with tofu, for healthy!And we, japanese cook miso soup with various vesitables, for example, tofu & onion,spinach, or taro & carrot. From Yuko in Japan Honest - this is the real thing. The secret is the Dashi granules. I'm a teacher and had a Japanese student bring me the box his mom used to make their miso soup. Had to go to a Japanese mark... Really great miso soup! We had enjoyed a delicious miso soup at a Sushi restaurant in Cleveland,OH and I was trying to come close to that. We actually thought this one was better. I used a red m... I suggest using firm tofu (it is easier to handle) and letting it drain first. Cut it in half and let it sit on some paper towels for a bit before you use it. This allows the tofu to better ab... This recipe can be easily adapted to whatever's in season, or in the fridge. If you're a potato lover, a simple but very comforting potato version - in the quantity of dashi given here simmer ... This was a big hit! I could not find dashi anywhere, so substituted fish bouillon. I added fresh spinach and prawns before the tofu to make it a meal. I have a Japanese neighbor and she stated that you cannot just wisk in the miso, you need to put the miso in a very fine strainer, put the strainer half way in the water and press miso thru with... I grew up eating miso soup made various ways. This is a good basic miso soup. I always use Shiro Miso, which is a white miso (less salty) than the Aka Miso, red miso paste. Some people also like... This had a nice taste but the silken tofu I used was too soft. I suggest a firm tofu. I also used a dashi that was MSG free. I think that is why it needed some salt for me. A really easy and qui... Continue reading >>

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