diabetestalk.net

Can Diabetics Eat Mandarin Oranges

Can Type 2 Diabetics Eat Mandarin Oranges?

Can Type 2 Diabetics Eat Mandarin Oranges?

Can Type 2 Diabetics Eat Mandarin Oranges? Diabetic foods list of diabetic foods superior. I do not know how true it is, but my diabetic educator told me that eating lots of oranges would keep your blood sugar level high on October 11, 2012 and that tangerines contain carbohydrates, as do all types of fruit. Del monte and dole make tangerine oranges without added sugar. This has caused mandarin mandarin orange, 1 medium, 4. The key is to control the amount of carbohydrates you eat especially, because some of my meals in the hospital included applesauce, sliced mandarin and orange juice. ) Avoid fruits as a result, eating these can help satisfy your sweet tooth. Even reversing diabetes for a long time is part of a general nutritional program. 14 aug 2017 oranges are healthy citrus fruits, but if you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about their high sugar content if your blood sugar levels are out of control. Fruit blends such as smoothies also have a high sugar content, which can increase blood levels and control weight. Can people with type 2 diabetes eat oranges? Power. Can type 2 diabetics eat mandarins? Youtube. For dish I just wanted you to know that there are some tangerines without sugar. Search for Googleuser content. Dec 2016 asking if you can eat fruit? Yes! only 2 tablespoons of dried fruit such as raisins or cherries contain 15 grams of carbohydrates, so be careful with the size of the portions. It is eaten in exchange for other food plan sources such as starches, cereals, dairy. You are probably aware of the goal of five a day, and this is equally important if you live with diabetes or not. Also, as a general rule, I warned you to eat too much fruit, many fruits can have enough fructose. I have seen that the labels of type 2 diabetes affect my health a l Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Oranges are a healthy citrus fruit, but if you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about their high sugar content if your blood sugar levels are out of control. Fortunately, oranges contain components that make them a nutritious part of a diabetic diet as long as you eat them in concert with other healthy foods. Video of the Day People with type 2 diabetes cannot properly modulate blood sugar levels because they either don't produce enough insulin or their bodies can't effectively use the insulin they do produce. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, making up between 90 to 95 percent of all diabetics, according to FamilyDoctor.org. The food that a type 2 diabetic eats can significantly affect blood glucose levels, so choosing the right foods is important. Fruit in a Diabetic Diet Fruit can and should be part of a diabetic's daily diet. Diabetics who eat between 1,600 and 2,000 calories per day need to eat at least three servings of fruit per day. Those consuming 1,200 to 1,600 calories need two fruit servings daily, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. The fiber, vitamins and minerals in fruit are essential to maintaining overall health. Because fruits provide carbohydrates, you usually need to pair them with a protein or fat. Oranges provide high levels of fiber, which is important for digestive health, and vitamin C, which supports the immune system. The carbohydrate count in one orange is about 10 to 15 g. For diabetics using a carbohydrate-counting system to determine how much they can eat in a day, an orange is one serving. For diabetics using the glycemic index or glycemic load of foods to plan what they eat, oranges are also a good choice. The glycemic load of an orange is about 5, a low number that indicates the fruit causes only a s Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

Compound Found In Tangerines May Help Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes

Compound Found In Tangerines May Help Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes

Individuals who have a family history of type 2 diabetes or those with pre-diabetes may consider eating more tangerines. A recent study published in the journal Diabetes indicates that a flavonoid found in these fruits may protect against type 2 diabetes, along with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The researchers explained that people who have several coexisting risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including excess abdominal fat and insulin resistance, are classified as having metabolic syndrome. The tangerine compound, called nobiletin, was shown to have a protective effect against symptoms of metabolic syndrome among mice that were fed high-fat Western diets. The study's results also showed that nobiletin consumption improved the animals' insulin sensitivity. As the investigators predicted, laboratory rodents that were not given the flavonoid in addition to an unhealthy diet became obese and showed signs of elevated cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as high blood levels of insulin and glucose. Scientists said that the compound stimulated the expression of fat-burning genes and inhibited the function of those that are involved in lipid manufacturing and storage. "The nobiletin-treated mice were basically protected from obesity. And in longer-term studies, nobiletin also protected these animals from atherosclerosis, the buildup of plaque in arteries, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke," said lead researcher Murray Huff. He noted that similar compounds have been found in other fruits, such as naringenin in grapefruits, although the recent study results indicate that nobiletin is nearly 10 times more effective for reducing the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can promote a balanced diet, which may be key for obes Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is There A Best Or Worst Fruit?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is There A Best Or Worst Fruit?

Fruit gets an unfair bad rap and is often feared to spike up the blood sugars among people with diabetes. But does all the worry around fruit for diabetes really have any truth? We look at three common fruit myths to bust. 1. Banana / Durian / Grape / Watermelon is bad for people with diabetes. There is a “best” or “worst” fruit for diabetes MYTH Many people avoid certain fruits in diabetes because they taste sweeter and believe they are higher in sugar. That is not entirely true. Fruit is a healthy food. It contains fibre, lots of vitamins and antioxidants. Regardless of the sweetness level, all fruits contain carbohydrates naturally, and a variety of fruits should be included as part of your meal plan. The key is to stick to the right portion sizes. Generally, we recommend to aim for two portions of fruit a day, at separate times of the day. For more details on portion sizes, head to Jasmine’s blog post. Another thing to consider that’s not as important as portion size, but may be helpful to optimising blood sugars, is the glycemic index (GI). Most fruits have a low GI because of their fructose and fibre which means the sugar is released slower into the blood. Melons and pineapple have medium GI values as do dried fruits like dates and raisins; a few are high GI including rockmelon and watermelon. Some fruits also tend to be lower in carbohydrates for the same portion size, like berries or guava. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can take a larger portion to make up the 15g carbohydrate serving size. But there is no best or worst fruit for diabetes, all fruits are healthful in their own way and provide unique benefits, so enjoy a rainbow! (click and drag on the text to tweet this/share on Facebook) Let’s look closer at each fru Continue reading >>

Does Eating Oranges And Tangerines Raise Your Blood Sugar And If So Should They Be Avoided?

Does Eating Oranges And Tangerines Raise Your Blood Sugar And If So Should They Be Avoided?

A: Oranges and tangerines contain carbohydrate, as do all types of fruit. All foods that contain carbohydrate can raise blood glucose, but this does not mean that you shouldn’t eat them, as carbohydrate is an important energy source for the body. The key is controlling the amount of carbohydrate that you eat at each of your meals and snacks. One small orange (about the size of a tennis ball) contains 15 grams of carbohydrate, as do two small tangerines. You can certainly include either of these fruits in your eating plan (and they’re a rich source of many vitamins, minerals and fiber), but you’ll need to count them as one of your carbohydrate choices or servings. If you’re uncertain as to how much carbohydrate you should be eating at your meals and snacks, I’d recommend that you meet with a dietitian who can give you more guidance. In general, however, men need at least 60 to 75 grams of carb per meal and women need 45 to 60 grams of carb per meal. Snacks, if you eat them, are typically 15 to 30 grams of carb. Continue reading >>

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Which are the best fruits for diabetics? This is the common question which arises in the minds of the diabetics as many of them believe that they can”t eat fruits as all fruits contain high sugar content. But there are lots of healthy fruits for diabetics which do not increase the blood glucose level and these fruits for diabetics could be said to be best fruits for diabetics. Fruits having these two characteristics are particularly beneficial fruits for diabetic patients: Low Glycemic Index -Fruits with low Glycemic Index(GI) are good for people with diabetes. Glycemic Index describes the effect of carbohydrates present in food materials on our blood glucose levels. Fruits with low GI will produce small change in our blood glucose and levels of insulin. Low GI fruits release the glucose slowly into the blood which avoids the sudden rise in blood glucose levels. This is an important factor in diabetes management. High Fiber content -Fruits especially rich in fiber are good fruits for diabetics as they have a low glycemic index. Fibers present in these fruits slow down the absorption rate of sugar in the bloodstream. Hence these are good fruits for diabetes. List of Best Fruits for Diabetics The healthy fruits for diabetics are listed below: -Called as a “diabetes superfood” by American Diabetes Association blueberries help the body to efficiently process blood glucose for energy. Blueberries have low calorie content which also helps in weight loss and losing belly fat. Fruits for diabetes increase the sensitivity towards insulin and help in managing blood glucose levels. -Grapefruits help in weight loss and this in turn helps to reduce insulin resistance. A study has found that consuming grapefruit could help in diabetes treatment. Scientists have found that an an Continue reading >>

Can Dogs Eat Oranges? Are These Fruits Really Good Or Bad?

Can Dogs Eat Oranges? Are These Fruits Really Good Or Bad?

Dogs are not always all about the meat. Some would go crazy for fruits. Several known healthy fruits for dogs include bananas, apples, and blueberries. You might even see these kinds of fruits as ingredients in the foods and treats of your dog. Not only these fruits promote better health for dogs, but also these become a favorite snack because of their delicious and sweet flavors. Nevertheless, not every fruit is safe for dogs to eat. Several dangerous foods for dogs like macadamia nuts and grapes can be poisonous to your dog. So, can dogs eat oranges? The answer is simple, and dogs can eat oranges. The sweetness isn’t a problem as natural sugars fed with fiber are very safe. In terms of how much of an orange your dog must eat, experts suggest that smaller dogs have between ¼-1/3 of a moderate-sized orange and bigger dogs may eat an entire one. There isn’t really a limit on how much vitamin C a dog can have for the reason that it’s water soluble and the excess levels are urinated out and do not accumulate in the body. Table of Contents Are Oranges Good for Your Dogs? – Know the Truth! Most of you know that oranges are safe for dogs, yet are they good for your dog? In other terms, is there any benefit you can get from feeding oranges to your pets? Well, the main nutrient found in the oranges is vitamin C or ascorbic acid. This antioxidant helps in healing wounds and protects one’s body from an illness or disease, making it an essential nutrient for human beings. According to a study, dogs don’t need exogenous vitamin C, which just means that they do not need some vitamin C supplements to be healthy. Healthy dogs that are fed with a balanced, normal diet do just fine without taking any additional vitamins. With that said, in several instances, additional vita Continue reading >>

5 Fruits To Avoid During Pregnancy Diabetes

5 Fruits To Avoid During Pregnancy Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is thought to affect 18 out of every 100 women and can cause serious problems in a pregnancy week by week, along with complications during delivery. Pregnancy diabetes can develop when the sugar levels in your blood begin to rise, and your cells become more resistant to absorbing insulin. While the extra sugar is necessary to produce enough nutrients for your baby’s healthy development, when it cannot be absorbed into your cells, it can cause your glucose levels to rise dangerously. If you are pregnant and worried about developing gestational diabetes, there are some healthy ways you can lower your risk. Pregnant women are often told to eat plenty of fresh fruits, and in most cases this is an excellent way to ensure you and your baby are getting the nutrients you need to stay healthy. When gestational diabetes occurs, it is important to limit your sugar intake, and this includes cutting back on how much fruit you eat during the day. Most fruits are high in natural sugar, which is generally easier for your cells to absorb, but when you are suffering from gestational diabetes, the glucose simply builds up in your blood stream, which can result in serious health complications for you and your baby. While health care professional still recommend eating three servings of fresh fruit during the day, there are some you may want to avoid. Oranges Oranges and its deliciously refreshing juice are both high in natural sugar that can be a problem if you have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. The added glucose in your body can cause your sugar levels to climb to dangerous levels that can put you and your baby at risk. If you simply cannot give up oranges for 9 months, then you want to limit how much you eat. Sticking with only a section of the fresh fr Continue reading >>

Best Diet For Diabetes

Best Diet For Diabetes

A diabetes diagnosis can cause a person to feel like a prisoner in his or her own body. Suddenly, there are all these rules about what can or can’t be eaten. Individuals need to be mindful of every piece of food that go into their bodies – or suffer myriad unpleasant consequences, ranging from frequent urination and extreme thirst, to vomiting and lethargy. Foods for diabetics are not just recommended: they are essential to feeling better. Following a carefully considered diabetic food list is one way to start eating right. In time, your choices will become a habit. Foods for diabetics: as good as bariatric surgery? A 2013 study published in Diabetes Care found that “patients with type 2 diabetes who consume a diet identical to the strict regimen followed after bariatric surgery are just as likely to see a reduction in blood glucose levels as those who undergo surgery.” Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center reported that blood glucose levels dropped 21 percent on average when patients followed the diet, compared to a decrease of 12 percent after combining diet with surgery. After a meal, test subjects on the diet had a 15 percent decrease in blood glucose level, compared to an 18 percent decrease when the diet was combined with surgery. “Everything in moderation,” say diabetic foods experts Researchers concluded that “reduction of patients’ caloric intake following bariatric surgery is what leads to the major improvements in diabetes, not the surgery itself.” They admitted that the diet is very hard to adhere to long-term in the absence of bariatric surgery, but emphasized that “controlled food intake” is the key to lasting beneficial health effects. Generally speaking, less than 2,000 calories a day is recommended for most people on diabet Continue reading >>

Can Dogs Eat Oranges?

Can Dogs Eat Oranges?

Dogs arent always all about the meat; some will even go crazyfor fruit! A few well-known healthy fruits for dogs include blueberries, bananas, and apples. You may even see these fruits as ingredients in your dogs food and treats. Not only can some fruits promote better health in your pet, they can also become a favorite snack thanks to their sweet and delicious flavors. However, not all fruits are safe for dogs to eat. Some dangerous foods for dogs, like grapes and macadamia nuts, can be poisonous to your pet. So where do oranges fit in on the safe-for-dogs fruit list? To put the answer simply: Dogs can eat oranges and the sweetness is not an issue, as natural sugars fed with fiber are safe, says Stephanie Liff, DVM and partner at Brooklyn Cares Veterinary Hospital in New York. When it comes to how much of an orange your dog should eat, Liff suggests smaller dogs have between 1/4 to 1/3 of a whole moderate-sized orange and that larger dogs can eat an entire one. There is not really a limit to how much vitamin C a pet can have because it is water soluble and excess levels are urinated out and don't accumulate in the body, says Liffs. Vitamin C is an important nutrient for us pet parents, so you would imagine that your pet could reap some of those same benefits from a bite of an orange. In some dogs, extreme exercise or stress can overwhelm the liver's capacity to make vitamin C, said Christine Keyserling, DVM at The Animal Medical Center in NYC . In these cases, it may be beneficial to provide additional vitamin C supplementation.However, for most petsits not required. The nutrients in oranges can have a positive effect on a dogs immune system. Additionally, Liff says thata dose of Vitamin C can be beneficial for dogs if they ingest toxic substances, including onion pow Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Mandarin Oranges?

What Are The Benefits Of Mandarin Oranges?

Mandarin oranges, also called tangerines, originated in China and are grown abundantly in parts of Asia. U.S. growers, primarily in Florida and California, have also been producing them since the late 1800s. They are sweet, brightly-colored and nutritious, but one of the reasons for their popularity is that they are easier to peel than many other types of orange. Mandarin oranges provide antioxidant vitamins and flavanones that may protect you from illness. Weight Control Mandarin oranges can add flavor and texture to your meals without adding inches to your waistline. One large mandarin orange has only 64 calories, but it gives you a gram of protein, 2 grams of fiber, virtually no fat and 13 grams of natural sugar. You can use mandarin oranges in place of less healthy ingredients. For example, chop some orange slices and put them on your salad in place of a fatty dressing, or add them to your smoothies as a natural sweetener. Antioxidant Vitamins Mandarin oranges, like all citrus fruit, are rich in antioxidants. A large mandarin orange provides 32 milligrams of vitamin C, about half your recommended daily intake. It also has 41 micrograms of vitamin A, giving you about one-sixth of your daily requirement for that antioxidant. Vitamin C helps your body absorb other nutrients, such as iron, from the food you eat, and both vitamins C and A fight free radicals that damage your cells and cause illness and premature aging. Diabetes Prevention Eating mandarin oranges may reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Mandarin oranges contain flavonoids, plant pigments with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Every 100 grams of a mandarin orange contains 8 milligrams of hesperetin and 10 milligrams of naringenin, flavonoids from the flavanone family. Researchers from a study Continue reading >>

More in diabetes