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Can Diabetics Eat Liver

Question? Can A Type 2 Eat Liver.

Question? Can A Type 2 Eat Liver.

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I`ve been told from when I started being diabetic that I cant eat liver but now I hear that I can, anyone know which is true. Well I love liver and eat it regularly.Why were you told not to eat liver? the only people who can't eat liver are peopel like me who are on warphin! Do you have warphin or taking asprin? As liver contains vitamin k and that is not good for people who take warphin and asprin as clots the blood instead of the warphin and asprin that unclogs the blood! only way i could think of expalining it other than that an I don't know whether this page has any bearing - but apparently warfarin users do need to take care of their vitamin K intake because it affects how effective the treatment is. Vitamin K is known to decrease the effects of warfarin, and there are large amounts of vitamin K in such foods as liver, broccoli, brussels sprouts, and green leafy vegetables (e.g., spinach, Swiss chard, coriander, collards and cabbage). This is where i get my info from! I have been on these pills for 14 years now! As far as i know there has been no changes i go to regular clinic every two weeks and not been told! This is the info that i was given at the start! I always ask if anything has changed, the one time i decided to eat liver six months ago, i ended up with a two day stay in hospital as my blood went too thick and i nearly died! as being on this drug for the amount of time i have been and i am on it for the rest of my life! I know someone who had an embolism and was put on warfarin some years ago. You are quite right about the Vitamin K. You can have foods containing it but only at low levels. It is something that can be life threatening if Continue reading >>

How Nutritious Is Liver? | Berkeley Wellness

How Nutritious Is Liver? | Berkeley Wellness

If youre a fan of eating liver (or considering trying it for the first time), here are some of the pros and cons of this organ meat. Good news: Ounce for ounce, liver is probably more nutritious than any other food. A 3.5-ounce serving of cooked beef or chicken liver supplies more than your daily requirement of vitamin B12 and large amounts of other B vitamins. It is also rich in protein, zinc, copper, iron, and even vitamin C, with only about 180 calories and 6 grams of fat. Bad news: Liver is extremely rich in vitamin A . Over time a high intake of this vitamin may increases the risk of fractures, some research suggests (this is not true of beta carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A as needed). And a 3.5-ounce serving averages about 500 milligrams of cholesterolmore than in two large eggs. (While the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans no longer put a daily limit on dietary cholesterol, some experts still caution that it may have adverse effects in some people, notably those with diabetes.) Half of the 6 grams of fat in that portion of liver are saturated. In addition, people usually fry liver in oil or butter (and often garnish it with bacon), which can double the calories. Another potential problem: Liver is more likely than other meat products to contain high levels of pesticides (from animal feed), as well as antibiotics and other drugs that the animals may have been given. Though the USDA has found that the residues are below toxic levels, frequent consumption might be a problem. Bottom line: Its okay to eat small portions of liver on occasion. Like liver, many are quite nutritious, relatively low in saturated fat, but high in cholesterol. Tongue, heart, and tripe have no more cholesterol then regular meat does. But sweetbreads, gizzard, and splee Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Meat (1 ounce = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbohydrate, fat varies) One ounce of meat is about the size of your thumb; 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards. No more thant 3 ounces of protein at a meal is recommended. (Try to eat meats from this page only; unfortunately, this means nothing fried.) Very Lean Meat Choices (0-1g fat/ounce and 35 calories) Poultry: Chicken or turkey (white meat, no skin), Cornish hen (no skin). Fish: Fresh or frozen cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, lox, tuna fresh or canned in water. Shellfish: Clams, crab, lobster, scallops, shrimp. Game: Duck or pheasant (no skin), venison, buffalo, ostrich. Cheese: Fat-free (less than 1 gram of fat/ounce), low fat cottage cheese. Other: Processed sandwich meats with less than 1 gram fat or less/ounce, such as: deli thin, shaved meats chipped beef, turkey ham egg whites (2) egg substitutes, plain hot dogs, fat free sausage, fat free or less than 1 gram fat/ounce Lean Meat Choices (3g fat/ounce and 55 calories) Beef: USDA Select or Choice grades trimmed of fat such as round, sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, roast (rib, chuck, rump); steak (T-bone, porter house, cubed); ground round. Pork: Lean pork such as fresh ham, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, tenderloin, center loin chop. Lamb: Roast, chop or leg. Veal: Leap chop, roast. Poultry: Chicken, turkey (dark meat, no skin), chicken (white meat, with skin), domestic duck or goose (well-drained of fat, no skin). Fish: Herring (uncreamed or smoked), Oysters, Salmon (fresh or canned), catfish, Sardines (canned), tuna (canned in oil, drained). Game: Goose (no skin, rabbit). Cheese: 4.5% fat cottage cheese, grated parmesan, cheeses with 3 grams of fat or less/ounce. Other: Hot dogs with 3 grams of fat or less per ounce. Processed sand Continue reading >>

Best Food Suitable For A Diabetic Type 2 Person

Best Food Suitable For A Diabetic Type 2 Person

Food plans for diabetics vary, depending on allowed individual sugar and carbohydrate content. In general, however, all persons with diabetes should eat, or avoid, the same foods. Avoid Foods Containing Sugar and Most Artificial Sweeteners This includes so-called “sugar-free” foods enhanced with artificial sweeteners. The Most Sugary Foods to Avoid Sweets and Chocolates, Including “Sugar-Free” Types These are not good foods for the diabetic, as they contain sugar and artificial sweeteners. Diabetics may eat Continental dark chocolate, with 70% or more cocoa solids, once a week. Foods Containing Significant Proportions of Ingredients Ending in -ose or -ol These ingredients are usually sugars. One notable exception is cellulose, which is a form of dietary fiber. Grains and Foods Made from Grain Products These include corn, rice, pasta, breads, cakes, tarts, breakfast cereals, and biscuits. Starchy vegetables Particularly avoid parsnips and potatoes. Limit carrots, beans (except runner beans), peas, and other starches. Be careful with packets of mixed vegetables. Limit Certain Dairy Products Limit milk to small quantities. Also limit cottage cheese, and sweetened or low-fat yogurts. Limit Commercially Packaged Foods These processed foods include frozen dinners, especially those marked “lean” or “light”, and snack foods or fast foods. Fruit Juices Choose fresh fruit instead, because it is lower in carbohydrates. For the fruit juice flavor, add a touch of fruit juice to water. Healthy Food for Diabetics This list of diabetic foods contains the best foods for diabetics to eat. All foods listed here are especially for Diabetes Type 2. All Meat Just when you were wondering, “What food can diabetics eat?” you find meat to be tasty answer. Bacon, pork, lamb, b Continue reading >>

Chicken Liver For Diabetics

Chicken Liver For Diabetics

Chicken Liver is one of the best and nutritious parts of the chicken. It is cooked in different ways such as by adding it in pansit, adobo, menudo and other local delicacies. Chicken liver is especially popular for vitamin K, which is helpful for blood clotting. When one is wounded, blood clotting occurs during which platelets of the blood stick together to cover would and prevent continuous bleeding thereby allowing the wound to heal. The essential role of Vitamin K is in facilitating the clotting of blood properly. Because of this, many people especially diabetic patients have become afraid of eating chicken liver. Diabetic patients usually experience blood clot risk. This is especially true for people with insulin resistance whose blood contain high levels of a protein called fibrinogen, which is the is ingredient that makes blood thick and easy to clot. There is a misconception among diabetic patients that eating chicken liver increases the risk of blood clot because vitamin K reinforces that clotting of blood. Thus, diabetic patients who are insulin resistant may increase their chances of getting random blood in their vessels. It must be noted that while vitamin K help in facilitating clotting of blood normally, having too much of it is not a factor in leading to abnormal blood clots which leads to strokes. In short, eating chicken liver is safe for diabetics including those with insulin resistance. In fact, eating liver is recommended for people with diabetes, who specially suffers from the slow blood clotting and whose wounds stay fresh longer and does not heal easily. The vitamin K in chicken liver helps in normalizing blood clotting so that wounds heal faster. Aside from Vitamin K, chicken liver is also rich in Vitamin B complex which helps prevent the inflamma Continue reading >>

The Healthiest Food You Arent Eating: Liver Pate

The Healthiest Food You Arent Eating: Liver Pate

The Healthiest Food You Arent Eating: Liver Pate Im always suspicious when it comes to anything labeled a superfood. Most people assume that these foods have to come from an exotic, far-away land. But in reality, some of the most nutrient-dense foods are ones that our ancestors ate, but have been neglected in recent years. In the past, animals were utilized for their entire bodies, not just the muscle meat. Organs were harvested and eaten, and the bones and necks were used to make broth. In some traditional cultures, organ meats are the most valued part of the animal because of their nutrient density. Liver is commonly referred to as natures multivitamin because of the breadth and concentration of vitamins and minerals it contains. When consuming liver it is important to choose a product that comes from a grass-fed or pasture-raised animal. Lets take a closer look at the nutrients you get from liver, and why its the healthiest food you arent eating. Vitamin A: Vitamin A is important for vision, proper cell development in the immune system, and reproductive capabilities. 1 , 2 , 3 B Vitamins: The B vitamins play an important role in the protection of the myelin sheath that covers neurons and helps conduct electrical signals in the body. 4 B12 deficiency is associated with cognitive dysfunction, and B12 is needed for the production of neurotransmitters and the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. 5 , 6 , 7 B vitamins help to prevent DNA damage, and aid in the production red blood cells. They also act as a coenzyme for reactions that are essential to cellular function. 8 , 9 Iron and Copper: These minerals contribute to the formation of red blood cells, and play roles in the structure, function, and reproduction of cells. Iron and copper also support proper thyroid funct Continue reading >>

The Liver & Blood Sugar

The Liver & Blood Sugar

During a meal, your liver stores sugar for later. When you’re not eating, the liver supplies sugar by turning glycogen into glucose in a process called glycogenolysis. The liver both stores and produces sugar… The liver acts as the body’s glucose (or fuel) reservoir, and helps to keep your circulating blood sugar levels and other body fuels steady and constant. The liver both stores and manufactures glucose depending upon the body’s need. The need to store or release glucose is primarily signaled by the hormones insulin and glucagon. During a meal, your liver will store sugar, or glucose, as glycogen for a later time when your body needs it. The high levels of insulin and suppressed levels of glucagon during a meal promote the storage of glucose as glycogen. The liver makes sugar when you need it…. When you’re not eating – especially overnight or between meals, the body has to make its own sugar. The liver supplies sugar or glucose by turning glycogen into glucose in a process called glycogenolysis. The liver also can manufacture necessary sugar or glucose by harvesting amino acids, waste products and fat byproducts. This process is called gluconeogenesis. When your body’s glycogen storage is running low, the body starts to conserve the sugar supplies for the organs that always require sugar. These include: the brain, red blood cells and parts of the kidney. To supplement the limited sugar supply, the liver makes alternative fuels called ketones from fats. This process is called ketogenesis. The hormone signal for ketogenesis to begin is a low level of insulin. Ketones are burned as fuel by muscle and other body organs. And the sugar is saved for the organs that need it. The terms “gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis and ketogenesis” may seem like compli Continue reading >>

Are Chicken Livers Healthy Eating

Are Chicken Livers Healthy Eating

While chicken is one of the most commonly eaten meats, the liver is often overlooked as an undesirable part of the bird. Chicken liver does contain a large amount of cholesterol, but it also supplies healthy doses of many essential vitamins and minerals. Look beyond the traditional liver and onions for new preparation methods that might just motivate you to give this meat another try. A diet low in fat, particularly saturated fat, can help you maintain a healthy weight and lower your chances of developing chronic illnesses such as cancer and heart disease. One chicken liver contains 2.86 grams of total fat, with 0.9 grams being saturated. The same chicken liver has 248 milligrams of cholesterol. Healthy adults with normal LDL cholesterol readings should consume less than 300 milligrams of cholesterol each day, the American Heart Association reports. The cholesterol content makes chicken liver only an occasional part of your diet. A chicken liver provides a healthy dose of iron and zinc. Iron enables your body to use oxygen efficiently and to make new red blood cells. This mineral also plays a role in cell division and the health of your immune system. An iron deficiency can cause fatigue, decreased oxygen and a weakened immune system. Healthy males need 8 milligrams of iron each day and healthy females need 18 milligrams. One chicken liver provides 5.12 milligrams of iron. Zinc plays a role in wound healing, immune system function and cell division. Adult males need 11 milligrams of zinc each day and females need 8 milligrams. One chicken liver contains 1.75 milligrams. Chicken liver is a nutritious source of B vitamins. One chicken liver contains 7.41 micrograms of vitamin B12, which is significantly more than the 2.4 milligrams you need each day. You need vitamin B12 Continue reading >>

Meat Lover's Guide To A Diabetes Diet

Meat Lover's Guide To A Diabetes Diet

Is the aroma of a sizzling steak too good to resist? If you're smart about how you choose red meat, it can have a place among other healthy protein sources in your diabetes diet. Having diabetes means making some specific dietary changes, but you don’t have to give up all of your favorite foods. You just need to make better choices. If you’re a meat lover, knowing how to select quality red meat and avoiding processed types, like certain cold cuts, is key. Cutting back on red meat and processed meats is beneficial even if you don't have diabetes because it's a heart-healthy strategy for any diet. And cutting back when you do have diabetes is even more important because all the fat and salt that comes along with processed meat can make diabetes control more difficult. On the other hand, your diabetes diet should include healthy protein, and the right lean red meat can fit the bill, but within limits. About Diabetes and Red Meat When researchers in Japan looked at the dietary habits and diabetes risk of 27,425 men and 36,424 women between 45 and 75 years old, they found that for men, but not women, red meat or processed meat consumption correlated with diabetes risk. The more of those meats the men ate, the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the authors concluded. A large study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found similar results in a large group of U.S. adults, although without a gender split. And when yet another team of researchers reviewed studies on this link, they found similar results across the board. The conclusion? Eating a lot of red meat and processed meat appears to increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes. According to these findings published in Current Atherosclerosis Reports, processed meat in particular, Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How Do I Help Protect My Liver?

Diabetes: How Do I Help Protect My Liver?

If I have diabetes, is there anything special I need to do to take care of my liver? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. You're wise to wonder about steps to protect your liver. Diabetes raises your risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which excess fat builds up in your liver even if you drink little or no alcohol. This condition occurs in at least half of those with type 2 diabetes. It isn't clear whether the condition appears more often in people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population because obesity, which is a risk factor, occurs with similar frequency in both groups. Other medical conditions, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure, also raise your risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease itself usually causes no symptoms. But it raises your risk of developing liver inflammation or scarring (cirrhosis). It's also linked to an increased risk of liver cancer, heart disease and kidney disease. Fatty liver disease may even play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Once you have both conditions, poorly managed type 2 diabetes can make fatty liver disease worse. Your best defense against fatty liver disease includes these strategies: Work with your health care team to achieve good control of your blood sugar. Lose weight if you need to, and try to maintain a healthy weight. Take steps to reduce high blood pressure. Keep your low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol and triglycerides — a type of blood fat — within recommended limits. Don't drink too much alcohol. If you have diabetes, your doctor may recommend an ultrasound examination of your liver when you're first diagnosed and regular follow-up blood tests to monitor your liver function. Continue reading >>

Beef Liver: Nature’s Vitamin Pill 9

Beef Liver: Nature’s Vitamin Pill 9

Beef Liver is nutritious, it is so nutrient dense I call it ‘nature’s vitamin pill’. It is diabetes friendly but be careful and only eat a few ounces at a time and test your blood sugars. Beef liver can raise blood sugars if you eat too much at once. Beef Liver is a nutritional powerhouse. Details to follow. Beef liver has carbs, so eat a few ounces and test blood sugars to see how it affects you. I eat beef or pork liver at least once a month. I only eat a few ounces at a time, one pound will last several days. Why? Beef liver does have carbohydrates and can spike blood sugar if you eat enough. I love liver fried in a skillet or very slow roasted but my favorite way is grilled. Doesn’t the liver in the picture above look delicious! The grilling adds a smokey flavor to the meat. Beef Liver is Nutrient Dense I hate to see ‘super food ‘ lists that do not include beef liver. The omission is usually by a ‘highly trained’ nutritionist who should know better. Why does this bother me? Compare, few foods are more nutritious than beef liver… and no plant can come close. Beef Liver is always more nutritious than the plants on the lists. The poster is usually from an anti-meat, vegan or vegetarian proponent. Typically the person sharing the incorrect information knows beef liver is more nutritious than the plants, truth matters little in nutritional dogma. Check out this list of nutrients… all of this in about 2-3 ounces of beef liver. One of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet. And some ‘nutritionists’ will have Kale, Spinach on a Super Food list and omit Liver… it’s ridiculous. Cooking Beef Liver Some people don’t like beef liver, I get it. There are so many ways to prepare, there really is NO excuse for not eating it. Add about 4 ounces per Continue reading >>

Diet For Diabetes & Liver Problems

Diet For Diabetes & Liver Problems

A diet for diabetes and liver problems balances the needs of both conditions effectively. Diabetics need to monitor carbohydrate intake to keep blood sugar levels within range, while those with liver problems needs to reduce the intake of foods that stress the liver, such as protein. Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids should also be a part of your diet. If you have diabetes and liver problems, speak to your doctor or health care practitioner about the optimal diet for you. Video of the Day The coexistence of diabetes and liver problems such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and liver failure occurs regularly, according to an article in the March 2007 issue of "Diabetes Care." Recommended diet modifications include reducing caloric intake, as weight loss diminishes fatty liver. A diet high in complex carbohydrates, low in red meat and high in monounsaturated fats, such as the Mediterranean diet, seems to help patients with diabetes and liver problems manage both conditions. While complex carbohydrates, such as sweet potatoes, lentils, brown rice, oatmeal and high-fiber bran cereals, are recommended for patients with diabetes and liver problems, it is important to keep the portions of these types of foods low to avoid spiking blood sugar levels. Eating too many carbohydrates will also lead to a glut in caloric intake and weight gain, which can exacerbate liver problems. As a rule patients with diabetes and liver problems should keep their protein intake low, because a damaged liver will have difficulty processing protein, according to MedlinePlus. A moderate to high intake of monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil, avocado, canola oil and almonds, works well for diabetics with liver problems. Omega-3 fatty acids from cold water fish, such as such Continue reading >>

Do You Eat Organ Meats?

Do You Eat Organ Meats?

All you Paleo diet fans out there, this one’s for you! I recently started eating organ meats twice a week. Although it hasn’t been easy, I feel stronger already. Liver, heart, or kidney might help you, too. Here are some things to consider. I had never eaten organ meats in my life, even though my mom used to make chopped chicken liver regularly. I didn’t like the taste or the thought of eating icky vital organs. Then I encountered the work of Terry Wahls, MD, a doctor who has recovered significantly from multiple sclerosis. She did it through a landslide of vegetables and fruits (nine plate-sized servings a day) and organ meats twice a week. I was with her on the vegetables. I like them, even though nine plates a day sounds a bit crazy. I figured I would give the organ meats a pass. But I’m serious about trying to get out of this wheelchair. I’m doing some other treatments too, so it seemed like time to give it my best efforts. I looked into organ meats and this is what I found. Dr. Andrew Weil writes, Liver is packed with vitamins. A four-ounce portion of calves’ liver gives you more than 1600% of the daily value of vitamin A and hundreds of times the daily values of vitamins B12 and B2 (riboflavin) as well as lots of iron, zinc, folate, and other essential nutrients. Paleo diet health blogger Chris Kresser, LAc, says, Liver is by far the most important organ meat you should be eating. It’s one of the most nutrient-dense foods in existence, and contains many nutrients that are difficult to get elsewhere. When you think about all the jobs the liver has in a body, it makes sense that it would need a lot of nutrients to get them done. Heart is also full of nutrients, especially coenzyme Q10. CoQ10 is a vital part of energy production, and hearts use a huge a Continue reading >>

Why Chicken Liver Is Good For Diabetics

Why Chicken Liver Is Good For Diabetics

Written By: Arun kumar Published In: ROOT Created Date: 2016-12-16 Hits: 2516 Comment: 0 Chicken Liver, one of the best and nutritious parts of the chicken, is cooked in many different ways. Chicken liver is popular for vitamin K and this vitamin is very helpful for blood clotting. Chicken Liver, one of the best and nutritious parts of the chicken, is cooked in many different ways. Chicken liver is popular for vitamin K and this vitamin is very helpful for blood clotting. When you are wounded, blood clotting happens during which platelets of the blood stick together to cover would and prevent continuous bleeding because of that allowing the wound to heal. The prime role of Vitamin K is in facilitating the clotting of blood properly, thereby many people, particularly diabetic patients have become afraid of eating chicken liver. In addition to this, diabetic patients normally experience blood clot risk and this is true for those people with insulin resistance whose blood contain high levels of a protein (known as fibrinogen), which is the is ingredient that makes blood thick and easy to clot. Many diabetic patients think that eating chicken liver increases the risk of the blood clot as vitamin K reinforces that clotting of blood. So, diabetic patients who are insulin resistant may increase their chances of getting random blood in their vessels. Keep in mind that while vitamin K helps in facilitating clotting of blood usually, having too much of it is not a factor in leading to abnormal blood clots which lead to strokes. We can say, eating chicken liver is safe for diabetics as well as for those with insulin resistance. Eating liver is recommended for people with diabetes, who suffers from the slow blood clotting plus whose wounds stay fresh longer and does not heal quick Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

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