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Can Diabetics Eat Junk Food?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

How To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Weight loss can be a symptom of diabetes. Because your body is unable to make use of sugar in the blood, those calories that would normally be utilized are lost. Even though you might be eating a normal amount of food, this loss of sugar and calories due to diabetes will still cause you to lose weight.[1] However, you can still work with your diabetes and maintain a healthy weight. Continue reading >>

This Is Your Body On Fast Food Whether It's One Burger Or Fries Every Day

This Is Your Body On Fast Food Whether It's One Burger Or Fries Every Day

This is your body on fast food whether it's one burger or fries every day Could a few days of junk food or even a single fast food meal make a difference in your overall health? Could a few days of junk food or even a single fast food meal make a difference in your overall health? Christy BrissetteSpecial To The Washington Post A client recently asked me, "How often can I get away with eating junk food?" She knows that my nutrition philosophy is the "80:20 rule": Eat healthy foods as often as possible (at least 80 percent of the time), but also enjoy the occasional less healthy food (less than 20 percent of the time), if that's what you really want. I've seen this approach work well with my clients who were previously chronic dieters yet hadn't been able to lose weight. Once I give them permission to have "forbidden foods," those foods lose their power and they're able to make healthier choices the bulk of the time. There is some evidence that "cheat meals" (although I hate that term) can help boost fat loss and mental health among dieters. Yet I wanted to give my client a more quantifiable answer. Could a few days of junk food or even a single fast food meal make a difference in your overall health? What is "junk food"? Essentially any food that is highly processed, high in calories and low in nutrients. Junk food is also usually high in added sugars, salt and saturated or trans fats. Some evidence points to junk foods as being as addictive as alcohol and drugs. "Fast food" is food that is prepared quickly and is eaten quickly or taken out. Although there are a growing number of healthier fast food options, most fast food can still be classified as junk food. Eating a poor quality diet high in junk food is linked to a higher risk of obesity, depression, digestive issu Continue reading >>

What Happens When You Eat Too Many Sweets & Fast Foods?

What Happens When You Eat Too Many Sweets & Fast Foods?

What Happens When You Eat Too Many Sweets & Fast Foods? Eating too many sweets and fast foods causes health problems. What Happens if You Get Too Much Iron From Foods? If youre a junk food junkie or have a monster sweet tooth, you could be doing damage to your health. Fast food and sweets are typically light on essential nutrients and heavy on ingredients that could lead to health problems. Eating too many fatty and sugary foods has been linked to everything from obesity to tooth decay and chronic diseases that can shorten your life. Fast food typically contains high amounts of saturated fats, trans fats, sodium, and many more calories than most people should consume in one meal. A 2008 Harvard review of 16 studies reported by PubMed concluded that fast food consumption may be worsening Americas obesity epidemic. Sweet foods and sweetened drinks are also high in sugar that can pack on pounds. A separate review of 30 studies published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2006 concluded that high consumption of sugary drinks contributes to weight gain and obesity. The excessive amounts of sodium in fast food can lead to elevated blood pressure. High blood pressure is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. A diet high in saturated fat and trans fats also increases the risk of these diseases by clogging the arteries. The risk of stroke may be related to the number of fast food establishments in a neighborhood, according to a study published in the "Annals of Neurology" in August 2009. In the study of a neighborhood in Nueces County, Texas, the risk of stroke among residents increased 1 percent for every fast food restaurant in the neighborhood. Additionally, a paper published in Physiology & Behavior in 2010 reported that large epidemiology studies show an Continue reading >>

Diabetic-friendly Options At Your Favorite Fast Food Chains

Diabetic-friendly Options At Your Favorite Fast Food Chains

For those people living with diabetes, developing an effective diet plan is one of the most important aspects of their overall treatment plan. Most find that preparing their own meals is the most effective method. However, it can be really, really difficult to avoid swinging through the drive through on a really busy day. Luckily, there are some fast-food options which are diabetic-friendly! Did you know that fast food chains offer some healthy options for diabetics? keep a few things in mind before making your order: Choose whole grains when possible Choose a meal that provides a variety of food groups in moderate amounts Look for items that have non-starchy vegetables Don’t add any extra salt to your meal Choose a meal that is not high in trans or saturated fats Don’t order the large size (Are you interested in participating in a clinical trial? Click here to sign up for one of our diabetes clinical trials in Port Orange, FL.) Order Out Smart Most fast food restaurants provide detailed nutritional information on all of their menu items. Be sure that you take the time to review this information before making your decision. We recommend sticking to menu items that don’t exceed: 400 total calories 20 grams of fat 800 milligrams of sodium per serving Wendy’s Our Recommended Order for Diabetics: The half-size order of Apple Pecan Chicken Salad. This delicious salad is not only healthy, but it’s also quite filling. Please note that Wendy’s Apple Pecan Chicken Salad is served with pecans and pomegranate dressing. Thirsty? Skip on the sugary soda and order an unsweetened iced tea. Nutritional Information: 340 calories 18 g of total fat (4.5 g of saturated fat) 60 mg of cholesterol 700 mg of sodium 29 g of carbohydrates (22 g of sugar, 4 g of fiber) 19 g of protein Continue reading >>

The Devastating Consequences Of Unequal Food Access: The Role Of Race And Income In Diabetes (2016)

The Devastating Consequences Of Unequal Food Access: The Role Of Race And Income In Diabetes (2016)

The Devastating Consequences of Unequal Food Access: The Role of Race and Income in Diabetes (2016) Increasing access to healthy food could help reduce diabetes ratesespecially for communities of color. But the solution is not as simple as "more supermarkets." Diabetes rates in the United States have nearly quadrupled over the past three decades. About 30 million Americans currently suffer from diabetes, and nearly 95 percent of these cases are type 2 diabetes, the diet-related form of the disease. If recent trends continue, close to one-third of the population could be diabetic by 2050. Untreated or poorly managed diabetes can lead to devastating and sometimes fatal complications: diabetes is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Diets high in sugar, salt, and fatand low in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grainsincrease the risk for type 2 diabetes. But what people eat is largely dependent on their access to various foods. Healthy food access is complex, and includes the physical environment (geographic proximity, transportation to food retailers, and availability); the economic environment (affordability); and the sociocultural environment (cultural taste preferences). Race and income are highly correlated with healthy food accessand with diabetes rates. Rising diabetes rates are a problem for all Americansbut they have hit African American, Latino, and Native American communities hardest. Members of these communities are about twice as likely as whites to be diabetic, they face higher diabetes-related mortality rates, and they suffer disproportionately from complications such as kidney damage and lower-limb amputations. Multiple causes drive these disparities. Lower incomes, combined with historical a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes involves making changes to your lifestyle, through diet, weight control and physical activity. Medication for diabetes, whether in tablet or injection form, is definitely not the only way to control your blood sugar (glucose) levels. How does type 2 diabetes affect your weight? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. The food you eat on a daily basis plays an important role in managing your diabetes, as well as ensuring you keep well and have enough energy for your daily activities. The same healthy eating principles apply whether you have diabetes or not. In fact, getting the whole family to eat this sort of balanced diet if you have diabetes can benefit their health as well as yours. Including foods from each of the main food groups described below will provide your body with the essential nutrients. See also separate leaflet called Healthy Eating. Fruit Continue reading >>

What Can I Eat

What Can I Eat

So, you've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Obviously, your first question is, "Holy Crap, is this gonna kill me?" The answer is, well, maybe ....or maybe not ….probably not …but then again …a part of the answer depends on what you eat. If you eat the wrong things it can get worse ….or maybe not. Unfortunately, and something you're gonna find very frustrating, is the answer to most questions about T2 diabetes is, “maybe – maybe not - depends on the individual, etc”… like trying to get a straight answer from a polititian ...that’s type 2 diabetes for you. If you're careful, and only eat the right things, you'll probably starve to death anyway, so don't worry about it. My mother had T2 diabetes real bad. She died - and she was only 89. I have T2 diabetes, and I get really hungry for foods I'm not supposed to eat. I've found that booze takes the edge off a little. Try supplementing your diet with 5 or 6 martinis before meals ...works for me. Never smoke pot …the munchies are suicide. Trying to figure out what you can eat is a bitch. One way is to pretend you're a rabbit, and go with your instincts. If you're not sure what a rabbit eats, follow one around for a few days, and when they start to eat something, take it away from them and eat it. Oh! …except carrots. You can't eat carrots ….well, maybe you can - maybe not. Try a few bites to see if you swell up and die. But, just to be on the safe side, it's best to stay with bushes and grass …maybe some twigs. Actually, there are a few other things you can eat. A quick web search will turn up tons of T2 diabetic-friendly recipes for delicious meals requiring only a total of 4 or 5 hours preparation time by somebody who doesn't have anything else to do but cook all day (if you like things like Continue reading >>

Increasing Trend Of Junk Food Use In Saudi Arabia And Health Implications

Increasing Trend Of Junk Food Use In Saudi Arabia And Health Implications

Increasing trend of Junk food use in Saudi Arabia and health implications This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. In Saudi Arabia there is increasing trend of junk food use. Combined with sedentary life style, high prevalence of obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and coronary heart disease, it is detrimental to health and will aggravate existing life style diseases in the country. People here eat more consuming more quantity with less quality. The fast food market in Saudi Arabia is expected to reach $4.5 billion in gross sales by 2015, driven by growing demand from its population. ( 1 ) Fast food is a major enterprise in Saudi Arabia. The major chains like Mc-Donalds, Pizza Hut, Burger King, Hardees, Little Caesars, Subway, Dunkin Donuts to name a few. Most meal packages with fries and coke run around 1520 SAR. Beside multinational food chains some national brands are Al-Baik, Shawerma Joha and Kudu are available. ( 2 ) Junk food, fast food and trash food are all definitions of a quick, unhealthy, hunger satisfying food, which are easy to make and easy to consume. They are low in nutritional value with a high caloric value. The term Junk food was coined by Michael Jacobson, director of Center for Science in 1972. Junk food contains high level of refined sugar, white flour, polyunsaturated fats, salts and numerous food additives but lacking in protein, vitamin and fibers. Junk food is popular because of their simplicity of manufacture, consumption and good taste. ( 3 ) Junk foods as burgers, pizza, fried chicken and chips usually has high amount of saturated fats. Fats cause people to put on weight and being overweight is a risk to heart and causes other disease as obesity and diabetes. Junk food often has too much salt which may make hypertension w Continue reading >>

Eating Away From Home

Eating Away From Home

For many people, eating foods prepared away from home is a way of life. Whether at restaurants, take-out counters, vending machines or corner stores, making healthy choices is possible and important. Balancing healthy food with regular physical activity can help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes or its complications. Here are some tips to help you enjoy healthy foods and meals wherever you are. Consider these healthy eating tips When planning a meal or snack, make healthy choices based on Canada’s Food Guide. Canada’s Food Guide describes how much food you need and what type of food is part of healthy eating. Choose foods that provide: Fibre Slows the rise in blood glucose (sugar), helps improve cholesterol levels and helps you feel full Choose vegetables, fruits, beans, lentils, whole grains Vitamins & minerals Help keep the body healthy and fight infection Choose brightly coloured vegetables over french fries, milk over pop, whole grain over white bread Choose foods lower in: Fat Provides extra calories; saturated and trans fats increase your risk of heart disease Limit fast food, baked goods, fatty meats, cream Sodium (salt) Can lead to high blood pressure Limit fast food, canned/dried soups, salty snacks, prepared frozen dinners Sugar Provides extra calories; may make control of blood glucose (sugar) and blood fats difficult Limit regular pop, fruit drinks, candies, desserts Overcome the challenges of making healthy food choices away from home Challenges I have faced Possible solutions Limited choices are available Bring healthy food from home such as sandwiches, nuts, and washed, pre-cut vegetables and fruit Check out all options before making your choice Portions are too big Think about portion size before making your choice (avoid “super-sizing� Continue reading >>

I'm Pregnant And Can't Stop Eating Junk Food. How Can I Control My Craving?

I'm Pregnant And Can't Stop Eating Junk Food. How Can I Control My Craving?

I'm pregnant and can't stop eating junk food. How can I control my craving? I'm 8 weeks pregnant, and all I want to eat is pizza, fast food, chocolate, and spicy dishes. I know these aren't the best choices for my baby or me. Help! I would like to give a shout out to all the moms-to-be out there who allow themselves to splurge a little during pregnancy. I am so tired of reading book after book and getting advice from those who preach about their weight gain after the baby. To only eat healthy food, because we will all regret it. Please. The reality is that no pregnant woman can sit there and turn down a couple of chocolate chip cookies when the hunger pangs get so bad, you can barely think straight. The reality is, if you return to the portions and the healty way of eating that you did before you had the baby, you will be fine (with a little extra effort at the gym.) The biggest mistake women make is continuing to eat the same way they did while they were pregnant, months after they have given birth. They forget what portions were normal. My girlfriends sit at lunch with their cheeseburgers and can't understand why they haven't lost the baby weight yet. I gained 60 and lost 55 within 3-4 months. Because I ate the same way I did before I got pregnant. Which for me was a lot of meat, salad and fruit. So, enjoy yourself a little, girls. Just be prepared that the feeding honeymoon is over after the baby is born. My first pregnancy I also craved junk food the entire time! Very not healthy and I ended up with edema and other problems causing me to have to be in the hospital for weeks and to deliver a month early. I would recommend that when you get a craving satisfy it in small doses. If you feel like pizza eat a slice or two, not the whole pie. If you are craving a burger o Continue reading >>

Junk Food Causes Similar High Blood Sugar Levels As Type 2 Diabetes

Junk Food Causes Similar High Blood Sugar Levels As Type 2 Diabetes

A junk food diet can cause as much damage to the kidney as diabetes, according to a study published in Experimental Physiology. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and the number of cases are rising worldwide at an alarming rate. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or doesn’t react to it. This causes an accumulation of sugar (glucose) in the blood, which can have severe long-term consequences for organs, including the kidneys, where it can lead to diabetic kidney disease. Hence, finding a way to block glucose reabsorption in the kidneys could offer a potential treatment for lowering blood sugar levels. In their study, researchers used animal models of diabetes and models of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance to see how insulin resistance and too much sugar or fat affect glucose transporters in the kidney. The rats were fed junk food consisting of cheese, chocolate bars, biscuits and marshmallows for 8 weeks, or a rodent chow high in fat (containing 60%) for 5 weeks. The researchers then tested the effect of these diets on blood sugar levels and the different glucose transporters in the kidneys. The effect of the diets on these transporters was compared with the changes also seen in rat models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. They found that certain types of glucose transporters (GLUT and SGLT) as well as their regulatory proteins were present in a higher number in type 2 diabetic rats. But a high fat diet and junk food diet caused a similar increase in those receptors. Dr Havovi Chichger, Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Science at the Anglia Ruskin University, UK and lead author of the study, explained, “The Western diet contains more and more processed junk food and fat, and there is a well-established link between excess Continue reading >>

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got Pre-diabetes? Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn't change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of which Continue reading >>

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