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Can Diabetics Eat Instant Mashed Potatoes

What Is So Wrong With Mashed Potato ???

What Is So Wrong With Mashed Potato ???

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I keep reading that boiled potato, new potato and jacket potato is ok in moderation but mashed potato seems to be a big no and i would like someone to explain why this is so ? After all mashed potato is just boiled potato with a bit of milk and butter right ??? The more you break a food down, the easier and quicker your body can process the carbs from ot so you get a "spike" in BG levels. Similarly, if you ate and orange, you would not get such a large rise in levels as if you'd juiced it. So, all carbs in moderation and the way they are processed affect how your body reacts. New potato is ok for me as a small portion but jacket potato spikes me the same way as mashed does probably a more starchy type but could be the length of time cooked to release the starch ? What 'Paul-1976' says is quite right. the more processed the Potato is, the easier the human body can break the strch structure down within the gut and hence give rise to rapid increases in B/G levels. For this reason the instant mashed potato should be restricted or avoided if possible. Adding Fat in the form of butter to the potato will help slow down the bodies metabolisim of the potato. It's all very confusing, but it might help if you can search the web for the GL ratings of Potatoes, and please don't be too surprised with what you find. Different types of Potato, different cooking methods, cooking times and preperation can give a wide spread in GL readings. The High GL loading of the Potato can be lowered considerably by combining this with a vegetable having a low GL rating so that the overal effect of the meal can be leveled out. Retrograding starch is a neat thing with pasta you can Continue reading >>

How To Make Mashed Potatoes Healthier

How To Make Mashed Potatoes Healthier

EatingWell's food editor Jessie Price shows you how to make healthy mashed potatoes without the butter for an easy Thanksgiving side dish. In this healthy cooking technique for easy mashed potatoes, we skip the heavy cream and butter to cut calories and cut fat and add flavor with garlic and herbs. Continue reading >>

Paula Deen (again), And Instant Mashed Potatoes With Tv Dinners

Paula Deen (again), And Instant Mashed Potatoes With Tv Dinners

Need help navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! That would be our weekly advice column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil is offering some thought on a recent episode of The View where type 2 Paula Deen co-hosted as a "diabetes spokesperson." Then, Wil delves into another aspect of food and diabetes by telling us what we should know about certain TV dinners. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Jeannie, type 2 from Pennsylvania, writes: I caught the episode of "The View" recently where Paula Deen was the featured guest. After she told her story of getting diagnosed with diabetes, changing her eating habits and losing 30 pounds, I was shocked to hear her promoting the idea of "one day a week of indulgence." She says on Sundays, she and her family eat all their favorite rich foods and desserts. Doesn't this stand against everything we PWDs need to do to make positive and permanent changes? I was outraged about this, but maybe I'm overreacting here...? [email protected] D'Mine answers: Ahhh.... so many issues... so little space. Well, I think we all need to cut Ms. Deen some slack. She's like one of those Old Testament prophets who gets dragged kicking and screaming into the good Lord's service. In a sad, Greek tragedy sort of way, she's playing out on the big stage the private battle that most people go through when they're diagnosed. I mean, would everyone who ever wanted diabetes please raise your hands? Nobody? I'm not too surprised. I think a lot of us, particularly those of us lucky enough to have fallen into education or advocacy roles, are sort of perversely glad, in retrospect, that we got diabetes; but no child ever said, "Yeah, I want to be diabetic when I grow up!" A diabetes diagno Continue reading >>

Diabetic Creamy Mashed Potatoes Recipe - Diabetes Self-management

Diabetic Creamy Mashed Potatoes Recipe - Diabetes Self-management

Place sliced potatoes in a pan and cover with water. Put lid on pan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until potatoes are tender (about 15 minutes). Drain well. Using an electric mixer on high, mash potatoes until smooth; periodically scraping down sides of pan. Add 3 tablespoons half-and-half and continue beating, periodically scraping down sides of pan. Add sour cream, butter-flavor sprinkles, salt, and pepper; continue mixing until smooth and combined. Thin as needed with remaining 2 tablespoons half-and-half. Calories: 93 calories, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: < 1 g, Sodium: 146 mg, Fiber: 1 g Exchanges per serving: 1 starch. Carbohydrate choices: 1 1/2. This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

What Should I Eat If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Q. Newly diabetic (Type 2). What can I eat and what shouldn’t I eat? Will one day matter? — risa59, Upstate N.Y. A. With all forms of diabetes, the goal is consistent management of your blood sugar to prevent the long-term damage to nerves, blood vessels and organs that can result from uncontrolled diabetes. When you have Type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or is unable to use it well. Overeating, particularly high carbohydrate foods like many of those served at Thanksgiving, will cause your blood sugar to rise. Even in the short-term, this can cause headaches, fatigue and leave you feeling generally lousy. Thanksgiving is just one day, but you will feel better and enjoy the holiday more if you pay attention to what and how much you eat. This doesn’t mean you have to miss out on your favorite foods. Hopefully, you are working with your doctor or a dietitian and learning about monitoring your blood sugar, counting carbohydrates in foods and staying active. For Thanksgiving, feel free to taste everything, but pay attention to portion size and limit your intake of high-carbohydrate foods. Remember that drinks like alcoholic beverages and eggnog are loaded with sugars, so it’s often a good idea to skip these and drink water since the table is likely to be filled with many of your favorite high-carb foods. Many diabetes educators advise patients to use a plate strategy during holiday time. Fill half of your 9-inch plate with nonstarchy vegetables — this includes salad, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, turnips, carrots and others. (You can find list of nonstarchy vegetables here.) Reserve a quarter of your plate for the turkey, but leave off the skin. The remaining quarter of your plate can include dollops of your favorite starchy foods l Continue reading >>

Easy Half-mashed Potatoes

Easy Half-mashed Potatoes

Leaving the skin on the potatoes increases the fiber in this recipe. By mixing the cauliflower with potatoes, you get the same volume for less carbs! 24 ounce (1lb 8 oz) bag fingerling petite potatoes, cut into 1-inch rounds with skin-on Add potatoes to a large soup pot. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil. Cook for 15 minutes. Add cauliflower to pot, return to a boil, and cook for 5 more minutes. Drain potatoes and cauliflower and return to pot. Add remaining ingredients and mash mixture with a potato masher. Mix with an electric mixer on low-speed for about 1 minute. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm all ingredients are gluten-free and this recipe can be made gluten-free. Find practical tips for reducing holiday stress and keeping up with healthy habits and diabetes control. Holiday travel can be stressful. Here's a guide to help you make better choices while at the airport. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's very active. This number estimates how many calories you should eat per day to keep your body weight where it is now. If you want to lose weight, you may need fewer calories. You should talk with your health care te Continue reading >>

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

It can be surprising to find out that potatoes are generally high on the glycemic index (GI), which rates how much certain foods raise your blood glucose. After all, it's a staple in diets throughout the world because potatoes are an affordable and nutritious vegetable. Plus, most people associate blood sugar with foods that contain sugar. How is it that a potato has a higher GI than white sugar? It's all about the starch and how it converts to glucose in your body. However, not all potatoes are created equal and there are ways to lower their impact on your blood glucose. You may still be able to enjoy a few potatoes here and there, you'll just want to keep your servings in check. Too often, glucose is associated with sweetness and regular white potatoes are not a food that's generally considered sweet. Potatoes are almost all starch, though, and that starch is made up of long strings of glucose. Since the starch in potatoes is rapidly digested, the glycemic index of potatoes can be almost as high as that of glucose alone. The glycemic index of glucose is 100 points where potatoes are usually listed as being in the high 80s or low 90s. Sucrose (table sugar), on the other hand, has a GI of 59 and is a disaccharide (two sugar) molecule. It is made up of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule joined together. Fructose is processed differently in your body than glucose, and it doesn't affect your blood sugar as much. However, fructose causes problems of its own when you eat too much of it. With that, it's fair to say that an ounce of carbohydrate from potatoes has twice the glucose as sugar. When you think of it that way, it's only logical that potatoes would raise blood glucose more. There are many varieties of potatoes and it would not be accurate to say that eve Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Low Gi Mashed Potatoes! And The Resistant Starch Content Of Foods

Low Gi Mashed Potatoes! And The Resistant Starch Content Of Foods

Low GI Mashed Potatoes! and the Resistant Starch Content of Foods Yesterday we saw that beans are low GI and why (resistant starch), and how they even have a second meal effect into the following day where BG spikes are significantly blunted in subsequent, non-bean, high GI meals . Potatoes are high GI, typically causing significant spikes in blood glucosenot the best choice for diabetics. But is there a way to prepare, say, mashed potatoes in a way that would not only make them significantly lower GI, but creating a second meal effect as well? OK, so per Tatertot Tim, heres a list of the resistant starch content of various foods (he hasnt thoroughly verified some of these but believes it to be largely accurate). Legumes/Beans/Lentils: 5-10g per cup, cooked Regular Corn Starch 1g per TBS (or less) The Resistant Starch content of food changes. Its different when raw compared to cooked, and different when cooked in various ways, and different when cooked and cooled. Theres no official way to measure RS. The gold standard is the ileostomy method also called in vivo. They feed a person or animal a food, then examine the contents of the small intestine just before it dumps into the large intestineany starch found is RS. The second method in vitro or test tube method, treats food with acids that act like digestion and then they measure remaining starch. Both methods get similar results. So way back when, I had the idea to make mashed potatoes but to preserve all the RS , which would be a huge amount; e.g., a 1 pound raw tater contains over 100g RS. My efforts were not successful, even doing them sous vide for 24 hours. I cant find it in my folder but Tim had a different idea, which was to cube and cook them in water at less than 140F, then drain and season. He liked them and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Friendly

Diabetes Friendly

Can diabetics eat sweet potatoes? Absolutely! There is a great deal of confusion about whether or not people with diabetes can include sweet potatoes in their diet. Before including any foods in to your diabetic eating plan, consult your healthcare professional. Plus, sweet potatoes contain virtually no fat and are low in calories. A medium baked sweet potato eaten with the skin is a mere 103 calories, about the same as half a cup of brown rice. And there might be even more reason for diabetics to include sweet potatoes in to their eating plans. Research has found these root veggies may play a role in stabilizing or lowering blood sugar, due to their low glycemic index. Foods low on the glycemic index break down more slowly in the body, which may produce fewer fluctuations in blood glucose and insulin levels. To get the most bang for your bite in terms of the glycemic index, follow these tips: For a low to medium glycemic index, eat sweet potatoes cooked, including the skin. When eating sweet potatoes without the skins, know that they fall into the medium glycemic zone, between 63 and 66, which is still lower than other starchy foods such as instant mashed potatoes and even whole-wheat bread. Searching for Diabetic Sweet Potato Recipes? Here’s a few! Visit our recipe page for more. Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Can people with diabetes eat potatoes? The answer is yes, and even more resounding when you have some info in your back pocket. Potatoes come in every form imaginable—from chips to potato salad, from fries to baked potatoes with butter and sour cream. Some forms are obviously more nutritious than others. And all can have varying effects on blood sugar. Here are some recommendations: Sweet potatoes and yams are good choices on the potato spectrum as they have a lower glycemic index and glycemic load than a regular baked russet potato, therefore affecting blood glucose less. Small red potatoes with the skin can also be a good choice. The skin provides fiber, which slows digestion and absorption. And small, whole potatoes may be easier to portion control. Serve a few on your plate as opposed to a whole baked potato or scoop of mashed potatoes. Try to limit fried potatoes and potato chips, choosing roasted, baked or broiled instead. Be aware of portion size. The plate method is an easy way to manage this: about ¼ of your plate should come from starchy foods and only the depth of a deck of cards. It might not be the potato itself wreaking havoc on blood sugar, but instead the portion of potatoes if it is more than about ¾ to 1 cup. Many, many years ago, nurses, dietitians, and diabetes educators were instructed to teach their patients with diabetes to eat certain foods and not eat others. But in more modern times, the belief and teaching method is based on making healthy food choices, understanding portion sizes, and learning the best times to eat in order to manage diabetes. This method of not having to eliminate foods from the diet is supported by the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Blood glucose control and food choice Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Mashed Potato?

Can I Eat Mashed Potato?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I ate a small potion of mashed potato yesterday, and the 1h number was just fine. Is that mean I can eat mashed potato next time even thought it is white ? I ate a small potion of mashed potato yesterday, and the 1h number was just fine. Is that mean I can eat mashed potato next time even thought it is white ? 1. Never think you can't eat something, just think there are somethings you either choose not to eat or to eat rarely/in small quantities. 2. Never base a decision on a single result You will find your carb tolerance will be quite an individual thing. I don't have as much problem with a potato as I do rice or regular pasta...but i'm not a huge potato fan, so I rarely eat them. Sometimes it will also be dependent on what you eat WITH a particular food. Adding protein or fat may slow the spike and make having a potato with cheese and broccoli on it a better choice than if you just had a potato. Dave makes an excellent point though...once you make something forbidden, you will want it more (human nature I guess). Take some cauliflower and boil with a 1/2 potato and then mash together. Might take care of that need and tastes pretty good too. If you had butter and cheese and other fats with your potato, the BG spike might not have happened until 2hr or even 3hrs after you eat. If you really want to know for sure, test once at 1, 2, and 3 hours just to make sure. Then you'll know for the future. I ate a small potion of mashed potato yesterday, and the 1h number was just fine. Is that mean I can eat mashed potato next time even thought it is white ? Did you also test after that to look for a d Continue reading >>

Glucose & Potatoes

Glucose & Potatoes

Potatoes are most nutritious with their skins on, providing you with significant amounts of vitamin C, fiber and potassium. Leaving the skins on may also lower the effect of potatoes on your blood glucose levels, since fiber slows down the emptying of your stomach and thus lessens any after-meal rise in blood glucose levels. Baked Russet potatoes are made up of about 21 percent carbohydrates. Each medium potato contains 4.6 grams of protein, 2 grams of fat and 37 grams of carbohydrates, including 4 grams of fiber. Only 1.9 grams of the carbohydrates in potatoes comes from sugars, including 0.6 gram of glucose, with another 30.2 grams coming from starch. Glycemic Index The glycemic index measures the effect of carbohydrate-containing foods on blood glucose levels; foods with a high glycemic index often cause spikes in blood glucose levels after you eat them. The glycemic index of potatoes can vary widely, ranging from a relatively low average score of 50 for boiled white potatoes to a high average score of 85 for instant mashed potatoes and baked Russet potatoes. The type of potato, method of preparation and whether you leave the skin on can all affect the glycemic index of potatoes. Minimizing Effect on Blood Glucose You can minimize the effect of potatoes on blood glucose levels by pairing them with foods that contain little carbohydrates, such as meat, or those that are low on the glycemic index, including beans, peas and most other vegetables. Eat a small serving of potatoes along with lean meat and a salad and the overall effect on your blood sugar levels will be relatively low. However, if you eat a large plate of french fries, skip the salad and add a slice of apple pie, your meal is likely to cause a large spike in your blood sugar levels. Considerations For diab Continue reading >>

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Despite being the most popular vegetable in the United States, potatoes have fallen out of favour somewhat with nutritionists over the last few decades due to a relatively low nutrient density and high levels of quickly absorbed carbohydrates. Many diabetics avoid potatoes altogether for fear of exacerbating their condition. Fortunately the news is not all bad when it comes to diabetes and potatoes and most diabetics can include a modest level of potatoes in their diet. The main reason diabetics are cautious when it comes to potatoes is their very high glycemic index (GI) value. The glycemic index is important for diabetics because it is a measure of the impact a particular food has on blood glucose levels once it has been digested. Eating large amounts of foods with high GI values results in a large increase in blood sugar levels which would normally result in a corresponding rise in insulin to bring blood sugar levels back to a normal level within a few hours. Because diabetics have an impaired insulin response, blood sugar levels can remain very high for quite some time leading to the typical symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and nerve problems. Potatoes have a GI value that ranges from 65 to 80 which is considered high. By comparison table sugar (sucrose) has a GI of 63, white bread has a GI of 71, wholemeal bread a GI of 60, and brown rice a GI of 55. Interestingly the method of cooking and variety of potato can affect the GI value of potatoes greatly. Newer potatoes tend to have lower GI values than older potatoes. Waxy potato varieties such as Red Norland, Yellow Finn, and Red Pontiac have lower GI values than floury potato varieties such as Russet Burbank and Norgold Russet. A 2005 study published in The Journal of the Continue reading >>

Are Mashed Potatoes Healthy Or Fattening?

Are Mashed Potatoes Healthy Or Fattening?

Home / Nutrition / Are Mashed Potatoes Healthy or Fattening? Are Mashed Potatoes Healthy or Fattening? By Holly Klamer, RD Leave a Comment Researched Based Article Consumption of potatoes worldwide is right behind rice, wheat and corn, and about half of potato sales in the US are from processed foods like instant mashed potatoes, French fries, etc. For many Americans, mashed potatoes especially are considered a comfort food and a favorite go to. There are of course many different ways to make mashed potatoes, but are mashed potatoes good for you? The answer to this question depends on many factors. How much are you eating, what is in the mashed potatoes, and what are you eating it with? Are you using mashed potatoes on a consistent basis in place of whole grains? The glycemic index (GI) is one way to measure the impact a food will have on raising blood sugar after you eat it. The closer the number is 100, the larger the impact on blood sugar levels. Eating a lot of foods that are high on the GI may increase your risk of type 2 diabetes or weight gain. High levels of blood sugar can signal high amounts of insulin to be released in the blood stream. Insulin is a storage promoter meaning when it is out, insulin will promote fat storage. Foods with high GI values are foods that are high in simple carbohydrates like soda, candy and white bread. Even though potatoes are primarily carbohydrates, the GI of potatoes can vary by variety and preparation. A 2005 study ( 1 ) compared the GI of potatoes prepared in different ways. Researchers found boiled red potatoes eaten cold had the lowest GI at 56. Instant mashed potatoes and boiled red potatoes had the highest GI value according to this study, 88 and 89 respectively. If you want to eat potatoes with a lower GI value, this stud Continue reading >>

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