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Can Diabetics Eat Dessicated Coconut

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Can You Eat Coconut Oil If You Have Diabetes? If you’re living with diabetes, you’ve likely been through the diet overhaul. Out with the rippled chips, white bread, and full-fat cheese. In with the whole-wheat toast, tofu, and celery sticks. Now you may want to replace the fats you use in your cooking. You may have heard coconut oil may be a good substitute, but you may not be sure how it would affect your diabetes. Is it better or worse? Here’s what you need to know about coconut oil and diabetes. Coconut oil, also known as copra oil, is derived from the meat of mature coconuts. The oil is rich in antioxidants and energy-boosting triglycerides, and low in cholesterol. Not only does the oil have a sweet, nutty flavor, but it also leaves behind little grease. It’s commonly used as a replacement for butter and olive or vegetable oils when baking or cooking. Coconut oil also has many cosmetic uses, such as: a natural skin moisturizer a leave-in condition for your hair an ingredient in homemade soap scrub and lotion recipes If you have diabetes, you know that maintaining a healthy weight is a key component of a diabetes meal plan. This is especially true of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes generally begins with your body’s resistance to insulin. Insulin resistance is linked to excess weight. A 2008 study found that people who consumed medium-chain fats like coconut oil as part of a weight loss plan lost more fat than participants who used olive oil. Coconut oil is high in medium-chain fats. This means coconut oil, a solid fat, is harder to convert to stored fat. This makes it easier for your body to burn it off. Although separate studies, such as this 2009 study in Lipids, have corroborated this, there isn’t enough research to definitively support this claim. Re Continue reading >>

Coconut Flour Nutrition, Benefits & How To Use It!

Coconut Flour Nutrition, Benefits & How To Use It!

Coconut flour is growing in popularity as more people discover the many health benefits of coconut flour nutrition, in addition to its many uses as a delicious, gluten-free, and healthy alternative to other flours. What do you need to know about coconut flour nutrition? Coconut flour is high in fiber, protein, and healthy fats and is free from wheat and other grains. It is also low in sugar, digestible carbohydrates and calories, and has a low score on the glycemic index. Click here to download the full guide on coconut flour, its health benefits and how to use it. This makes coconut flour a favorite amongst paleo dieters, gluten free eaters including those with Celiac Disease or a gluten sensitivity, those with digestive problems like leaky gut syndrome, anyone with a nut allergy, those with diabetes, vegetarians, and just about everyone else in between. Coconut flour is made from ground and dried coconut meat. Once the outer green husk of a coconut is removed, what remains inside is the rich, inner white lining which is the coconut meat. Coconut flour is not actually “flour” in the way we normally think of it; it contains zero grains, zero nuts, and is made completely of pure coconut. Flour can be made from many things including nuts, seeds, dried vegetables, and of course coconut meat. Coconut meat is the white, firm part of the coconut that you would find if you cracked open the fresh coconut and scraped out the insides, but this needs to have its milk separated in order to produce the dry “flour”’. Once the meat is strained and separated from the coconut’s milk, it is baked at a low temperature to dry it out and create a powdery flour made entirely of coconut. Coconut Flour Nutrition Benefits There are numerous reasons to love all that coconut flour nut Continue reading >>

Give Desiccated Coconut A Try!

Give Desiccated Coconut A Try!

We all are aware of benefits of eating coconuts. Be it the delicious pulp or the water inside, or the oil which can be extracted from it the fruit is extremely useful and healthy. But how many of us know about desiccated coconut? After all, that too has a lot of health benefits. Let us find out more about it. Coconut is widely used in desert countries and the tropical areas like Malaysia. Coconuts are primarily found in the coastal regions of a country. Desiccated coconut is widely used in the milk industries, pharmacy and in pharmaceutical industries. In south-east Asia, coconut milk is often used in cooking. Desiccated coconut is coconut flesh which has been grated and then dried.The drying process preserves most of its nutritional ingredients. It is essential to be present in our diet because it is very good for our heart, skin and blood. This desiccated coconut prevents many illnesses from occurring and the best part of it is that it is absolutely cholesterol free. Doctors often prescribe it to their patients, especially who are in dire need of consuming some healthy food. The total fat content is 24g (in terms of daily allowance of fat consumption, this takes up only 37%) of which 22g is saturated.It also provides 242mg (11% rda) of salt, 3g of protein, 44g (15% rda) of carbohydrates and 8g of dietary fiber (34% rda). It has very low (3%) moisture content, while the fresh coconut milk has nearly 68% of moisture. We get 388 calories from an 85 gram desiccated coconut. 1% calcium and 7% iron is also found in coconut milk. But the most important thing is that this desiccated coconutform of the fruit contains Medium Chain Triglycerides, or MCTs which are a lot healthier than their siblings, LCTs or the Long Chain Triglycerides. It has been found by biochemical experim Continue reading >>

Coconut Meat & Diabetes Nutrition

Coconut Meat & Diabetes Nutrition

For thousands of years, coconut has been part of the daily diet of many Pacific islanders, and various coconut-based products are now available in the U.S. to provide your diet with a delicious exotic touch. If you have diabetes, carbohydrates are the most important nutritional factor to control it. Counting your carbs at each meal is the best way to keep your blood sugar levels in check. However, most diabetes exchange lists do not include coconut meat and other related products and it can be difficult to know how coconut can fit in your diabetes diet. Video of the Day Fresh Coconut Meat A piece of fresh coconut meat of about 2 by 2 inches and about 1/2 inch thick contains 159 calories, 6.9 g of carbohydrates and 4 g of dietary fiber. When tracking your carb intake with diabetes, you can subtract the dietary fiber from the total carbohydrates to determine the available carb content, also called net carb, of a food. In this case, a small piece of fresh coconut meat would contain 2.9 g of available carbs. If you eat two to three pieces that size, double or triple the amount of carbs. Use available carbs when tracking your carb intake, as they give a more accurate picture of how your food choices will influence your blood sugar levels after your meal. Dessicated Coconut Unsweetened dessicated coconut meat contains 187 calories, 6.7 g of carbohydrates and 4.6 g of fiber per ounce, which is the equivalent of 2.1 g of available carbohydrates. The same serving of sweetened dessicated coconut meat provides 129 calories, 14.7 g of carbohydrates and 2.8 g of fiber, or approximately 11.9 g of available carbohydrates. Stick with unsweetened coconut products to keep your carb intake within your recommended target and avoid making your blood sugar levels rise above the desirable ran Continue reading >>

Coconut

Coconut

Tweet Coconut can be consumed in many different forms, and it can have a variety of benefits for people with diabetes. The coconut has great versatility, and it can form part of many people’s daily diets. It is highly nutritious and rich in fibre, vitamins and minerals, and it provides the majority of the food eaten on many islands worldwide. A coconut is actually a one-seeded drupe, not a nut, nor a fruit. Coconuts are generally regarded as having a number of advantageous for people with diabetes. Nutritional benefits of coconut Coconuts are high in naturally occurring saturated fat from short and medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) such as lauric acid. Lauric acid is converted in the body into monolaurin [163], a beneficial compound that destroys a wide variety of organisms that cause disease. It is used to fight common colds and viral infections, such as the flu. Coconuts also contain the following nutrients that can have benefits for the body: Vitamin C Thiamin (vitamin B1) Folate Potassium Manganese Copper Selenium Iron Phosphorous Potassium Coconut milk Coconut milk is derived from the flesh of the coconut. Coconut milk can come in two main forms: A thicker form, sometimes called coconut cream, that is commonly used in desserts or rich sauces A more fluid form, containing more added water, that can be used as a direct substitute for milk The more fluid form of coconut milk typically has no more calories than semi-skimmed milk. However, there are more calories in the thicker form of coconut milk, and caution may need to be exercised in regard to portion sizes. Furthermore, some forms of thicker coconut milk are heavily processed and include emulsifies, which might be bad for gut health and increase the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Coconut flour Coconut fl Continue reading >>

Unsweetened Desiccated Coconut Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Unsweetened Desiccated Coconut Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Gestational Diabetes Easter Happy Easter ladies, time to start planning your Gestational Diabetes Easter! To help you with Read More Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes in both the mother and child We felt it Read More Happy Chinese New Year! Kung Hei Fat Choi! For 2018 Chinese New Year we are celebrating the year Read More Pancake Day or Shrove Tuesday Pancake Day is almost upon us (Tuesday 13th February 2018) and many ladies Read More Gestational diabetes Party food Gestational diabetes party food can be hard to try to figure out and Read More Gestational diabetes Christmas Survival Guide! Here's your ultimate survival guide to a gestational diabetes Christmas. Dedicated to all Read More Dreading Halloween with GD? Is the thought of Trick or Treating filling you with dread and turning into Read More Happy 3rd Birthday Gestational Diabetes UK Mums Facebook group! To celebrate 3 years since the launch of the Read More Happy Mother's Day! With Mother's Day coming up soon in the UK (Sunday 26th March), I thought it Read More Soup It's cold outside and you want something warm and filling. You know a salad just isn't going Read More Continue reading >>

Is Coconut A Good Food For People With Diabetes?

Is Coconut A Good Food For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Foods Diabetics Can Eat

Foods Diabetics Can Eat

If you are looking for a list of foods diabetics can eat you have come to the right place. Diet is the most important way for diabetic, hypoglycemic, and insulin resistant patients to manage their sugar issues. The best plan of attack for these folks is to start with a low fat / anti-inflammatory diet. Once you understand the basics of a plant-based anti-inflammatory diet you can go deeper. One of the most damaging problems to a diabetic's body is the inflammation caused by unchecked high blood sugar. If you are trying to reverse diabetes, it is extremely important to also control your inflammation. I have a page that lists foods diabetics should avoid, but this page instead focuses on food you can eat. Anti-Inflammatory Foods Diabetics Can Eat Most Organic Vegetables What you are looking for is raw vegetables. Raw vegetables do not cause wild sugar spikes and swings. Organic vegetables are not genetically-modified and cause a lot less inflammation than non-organic veggies. Herbs like parsley, oregano, sage, and basil. Most spices are fine but avoid spicy ones. Hot sauce and hot peppers are very inflammatory; don't eat them. Avoid nightshades like eggplant, tomatoes, and bell peppers if you have autoimmune issues. Most green leafy vegetables are great. Collard, mustard greens, spinach, lettuce, and kale. The squash family, like zucchinis, cucumbers, and baby yellow squash are good choices. Stalk veggies are good too, like celery and rhubarb. Onions, garlic, leeks, shallots, chives, and green onions are good too, but be careful; they can get pretty high in carbohydrate counts if you have too much. Root vegetables are good choices like turnips, radishes, kohlrabi, and yucca, but most of these have to be cooked which makes them disrupt your sugar balance more. Although swe Continue reading >>

Coconut, Coconut Water, And Type 2 Diabetes

Coconut, Coconut Water, And Type 2 Diabetes

Many of us have romantic, idealized views of coconut think, a tropical island and a whole lot of vacation! But of course, coconuts, along with all their byproducts are not just found in tropical holiday destinations, they can be found in modern day supermarkets (coconut flour, shredded coconut, coconut milk, coconut water, etc.). Coconuts originated in India and Southeast Asia, and were eventually brought to the Americas. Its actually believed that they got their name from the Portuguese word coco, meaning laughing face because thats what Portuguese sailors thought they looked like. So when it comes to type 2 diabetes, how healthy is coconut and coconut water, in particular. You may be wondering are coconuts actually nuts? Technically, the coconut meets the criteria for being a Coconuts have an outer layer, a fibrous husk beneath that, and coconut meat (the white stuff that we eat) inside. Importantly, coconut water is not the same thing as coconut milk. Coconut milk is the creamy, white liquid that comes from mature coconuts. Its often used in rich dishes such as curries. Coconut water (which well be focusing on in this article) comes from young coconuts. Keep that in mind the mature and the young coconuts produce different byproducts, which have different nutritional qualities. Coconut meat is moderately high in calories ( cup contains 71 calories), principally because of its high fat content made up of medium-chain fats, otherwise known as coconut oil. about coconut oil over here and it's an extremely healthy source of fat that provides many health benefits. That same quarter cup of coconut meat contains around 6.5 to 7 grams of carbohydrates, minimal protein, and around 2 grams of fiber. Coconut's high fiber content is one major benefit of the food. It contains bot Continue reading >>

Snowball Cookies {good Healthy Snacks, Sugar Free!}

Snowball Cookies {good Healthy Snacks, Sugar Free!}

Snowball Cookies {good healthy snacks, sugar free!} Snowball cookies are guilt-free treats if your on sugar free diet ? 100%sugar free cookie recipes with less than 5 g of carbs per bites those snowball cookies will fix your sweet cravings Coconut Snowball Cookies Anideal Snackfor diabetic Coconut Snowballs is an ideal sugar free cookies recipe. It is a very basic and simple but it is also one of my favourite snack since I am a diabetic. I created this Coconut Snowballs recipe by myself after making a white egg less cake. I did not know what to do with white eggs except meringue. Ah ah I loved meringue so much ! And I thought, how can I do a sort of sugar-free meringue? That is how I created this Coconut Snowball Cookies recipe. I started to firmly whisk the white eggs like for a meringue than I added dessicatedcoconut until I can form balls in my hands. A bit of Naturals stevia powder to sweeten the whole thing and few drops of beet juice that I am always using as a natural pink food colour. Both of the last ingredient are reallyoptional that is why I said 2 ingredients recipe. You can obviously use pink colour from the supermarket if you do not have beet juice. Coconut Snowball Cookies A 2 ingredientsRecipe Coconut Snowballs Less than 5 g of Carb per bites I baked them at low heat 160 C for 45 minutes. Like for a meringue it was more adrying step rather than baking step. After baking and cool down it gave crunchy sweet coconut snowballs. It is really nutritious full of protein brought by the white eggs and low carb as dessicated coconut contains only 22g of carbs/100g. I made about 40 balls with this recipe about 12 g a ball and two of them were enough to feel full at snack time. So it is snack with less than5 gcarb. And if you are looking for more sugar free low car Continue reading >>

Why Is Coconut Good For You?

Why Is Coconut Good For You?

Coconut is full of diverse health benefits from protecting against heart diseases to preventing tooth decay! Some experts believe coconut can do the following for our health: Protect against heart disease by increasing good cholesterol and lowering the ratio of bad and good cholesterol. Helps treat malnutrition because it is easy to digest and absorb. Kills disease-causing bacteria, fungi, yeasts and viruses because of the antimicrobial effects of its fatty acids. Helps diabetics by slowing sugar release into the bloodstream. Prevents strokes and brain disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Boosts metabolism and increases energy because it is more likely to be burned as fuel than stored as body fat. Prevent tooth decay - coconut oil fights bacteria responsible for tooth decay and could be a healthy, non-chemical additive in toothpaste and mouthwash, Irish research suggests. Scientists found that when the oil was treated with digestive enzymes it became a powerful killer of mouth bugs that can lead to dental caries. While protection against heart disease is one of the claimed benefits of coconut oil, the Heart Foundation strongly recommends avoiding it. "Coconut oil, milk and cream are all high in unhealthy saturated fat, which raises bad cholesterol levels, clogs the arteries and increases the risk of heart disease," says Barbara Eden, the Heart Foundation's senior manager of food supply. "Our recommendations are based on good-quality scientific evidence and don't recommend eating foods high in saturated fat. There are many healthier oils that don't raise cholesterol levels or increase the risk of heart disease." DAA spokeswoman Tania Ferraretto agrees and says the evidence of any health benefits from coconut oil is inconclusive. The Coconut Research Center's D Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Coconuts?

Can Diabetics Eat Coconuts?

Diabetes isn't the death sentence it was in the days before insulin, but it's still not a condition to take lightly. A healthy lifestyle is crucial to living well with diabetes, and managing your diet plays a significant part in that process. Once you've learned how foods -- especially carbohydrates -- affect your blood sugar, you can evaluate foods such as fresh coconuts and make educated estimates about whether and when you can eat them. It's Not Black and White In its infancy, diabetes management focused largely on avoiding high-sugar foods. Medical professionals now have a more nuanced understanding of how foods affect blood sugar, and educators have moved away from simple lists of foods to eat and not eat. Instead the emphasis is on managing your total carbohydrate consumption. This includes favoring carbohydrates that digest slowly over those that digest quickly, which helps avoid major swings in your blood sugar levels. Savvy meal planners also pay attention to dietary fiber, which slows the absorption of carbs and sugars from your foods. Carbs and Coconuts Fresh coconut is a very modest contributor to your daily total consumption of carbohydrates, in part because a little goes a long way. It's often shaved or shredded into dishes as a garnish because solid pieces require a jaw-tiring quantity of chewing. Consider a 2-inch square of coconut, roughly 1/2 inch thick, a good snack-sized portion. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's figures estimate that total carbohydrates would account for 6.9 grams of its 45-gram weight, or roughly 2 percent of your recommended daily allowance. Of that 6.9 grams, only 2.8 grams come in the form of sugar. Finding the Fiber Just as importantly, coconut is an exceptional source of dietary fiber. So much so, in fact, that coconut fibe Continue reading >>

Coconut For Diabetes

Coconut For Diabetes

Coconut is a very nutritious food that can be eaten raw or used as an ingredient in cooking. The milk of the coconut makes a very refreshing drink and is reputed to be extremely nutritious. Coconut is good for diabetes management as it has a beneficial impact on blood sugar levels. To understand how raw or tender coconut is good for diabetes management it is necessary to have some basic knowledge about diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where the body is unable to convert glucose or sugar that is absorbed from food, into energy. The conversion of glucose to energy requires the presence of insulin, a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas. 1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 2 Warning: 3 Foods to Avoid These 3 Foods Should Come with a Warning Label Nucific In diabetes, either the pancreas cannot secrete insulin (type 1 diabetes) or the body does not utilize the insulin effectively (type 2 diabetes). As the body is unable to convert glucose into energy, the glucose remains in the bloodstream causing high blood sugar levels which has a very damaging effect on the body. Diabetics are prone to developing many other diseases like coronary heart disease and kidney disease. In fact, the majority of deaths in the case of diabetics is due to coronary heart disease. Benefits: Coconut meat is a rich source of nutrients and fiber. Coconut fiber helps in regulating blood sugar levels and can also reduce the risk of heart disease by helping to lower cholesterol levels. It has anti-cancer properties and acts as an aid in the digestive process. Coconut fiber helps bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract kill dangerous bacteria and also helps to expel intestinal parasites. It helps regulate blood sugar Continue reading >>

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut oil has been called a “superfood” with positive effects on heart and brain health, weight loss (especially abdominal fat) and a whole host and anti-inflammatory effects. But is coconut oil really a superfood? Or is it just the newest fad out there on the internet? Coconuts Coconuts have traditionally been the main staple food in many Asian and Pacific populations. In those same populations, coconut has also long been used as a medicine to treat infections, respiratory conditions, constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, kidney stones, and other disorders. Coconut meat (the whitish flakes) is high in fiber, protein, minerals such as manganese, selenium and iron and contains Vitamin C and B vitamins along with plant sterols. Coconut meat is also high in calories from fats—the fats are primarily the saturated fats along with high amounts of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut flour is the finely ground coconut meat. Coconut milk (pressed from coconut meat) is similar to coconut meat as far as its nutritional profile—it is high in fiber, protein, richer than coconut meat in minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium and contains Vitamins C, E and B vitamins. Coconut milk is also high in plant sterols and calories from fats. These fats are also in the saturated form with high levels of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut water is diluted coconut milk and is much lower in calories. Finally, coconut oil is very high in calories from saturated fats and omega-6 fatty acids with essentially no vitamins, minerals, protein or fiber—in other words, pure fat. The fats in coconut oil are in the form of medium-chain triacylglycerols, or MCT. Fats and Health For many years, fats in food were considered the main cause for fats on the body. Continue reading >>

Coconut Devotees Claim It Contains 'healthy' Fats But A Helen Bond Isn't Convinced | Daily Mail Online

Coconut Devotees Claim It Contains 'healthy' Fats But A Helen Bond Isn't Convinced | Daily Mail Online

From a sprinkling of desiccated coconut on sponge cake or coconut milk in creamy curries, it hardly seems the stuff of super-healthy diets. Yet coconut has had something of a reinvention as a health food, with coconut-based products becoming increasingly popular, fuelled by growing numbers of people cutting out dairy. Sales of coconut water in Britain soared by 120 per cent in 2014, while Sainsbury's reported a 400 per cent rise in sales of coconut oil. Devotees claim coconut contains 'healthy' fats, which are better for the heart and can even aid weight loss. Sales of coconut water in Britain soared by 120 per cent in 2014 But Helen Bond, a dietitian and spokesman for the British Dietetic Association, isn't convinced. 'People think that because coconut is natural it must be healthy - unaware it carries surprising amounts of calories and saturated fat,' she says. Here, she assesses the most popular coconut products... Coconut oil is touted as a good alternative to other oils because it has a slightly higher smoke point, meaning that when it's heated it produces fewer harmful free radicals - molecules linked to ageing and disease - and loses less of its nutrients. It is also been claimed to speed weight loss; a Brazilian study in 2009 found obese women on coconut oil supplements lost more weight around the abdomen than those on a soy bean oil supplement. 'I can't see how it could aid weight loss,' says Helen Bond. 'Coconut oil has the same calories as olive oil, but 1 tbsp provides 13g of saturated fat, compared with 2.1g in olive oil. 'A woman is recommended to have no more than 20g saturated fat in a day [and a man 30g], so that's a huge amount.' When it's heated coconut oil produces fewer harmful free radicals - molecules linked to ageing and disease However, fans of Continue reading >>

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