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Can Diabetics Eat Crab

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (GDM) can sometimes make you feel like you’re missing out. Missing out on a casual snack, a rich and creamy meal, that extra soda or that piece of cake you’ve been coveting. And GDM comes about at a time in your pregnancy when you’re probably tired and want to indulge a little. Annoyingly GDM is there, shaking its head at you, ordering you to put down the hot chips and put your hands where it can see them. By now, after looking through GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com, hopefully you’ll have noticed that there is in fact a whole lot of delicious food you can eat despite how you felt after your initial diagnosis. And yes, cooking with GDM does take planning and some re-thinking your approach to food, but once you understand the basics you’ll feel empowered and hungry! So managing your meals in the ‘safety’ of you own kitchen is all well and good, but what happens when you want to eat out or order in? Here are some helpful tips for approaching these kinds of meals. Article written by Lisa Taylor (GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com founder) and Natasha Leader (Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator and GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com In-Kitchen Dietitian) “Surely it’s okay just this once…” It’s tricky to say just how often eating out should be done. It depends on the quality of what you’re eating and your overall health. When you’re pregnant there is more to think about from a food safety perspective, which can reduce your options and can in turn push you towards not so healthy options – unless you plan carefully. Food prepared outside the home is more likely to be higher in sodium (salt) and unhealthy fats compared to what you might make at home and this has implications for general health in the long t Continue reading >>

What Is Imitation Crab Meat? It's Called Surimi And It's A Fake Crab Stick

What Is Imitation Crab Meat? It's Called Surimi And It's A Fake Crab Stick

7 Reasons to Stop Eating This Highly Processed Seafood Those imitation crab sticks (surimi) wrapped in packages in the fish cooler at the supermarket are very tempting: they look like crab, they even taste a little like crab, and theyre much less expensive and always available. But what is in them, really, that makes them look and taste like something else? First of all, if yourguests think the mushroom caps are stuffed with real crabmeat, is surimi crab sticksomething youwould serve them in good conscience? Lets look into the essence of fake crab and you can decide for yourself. Surimi is Japanese for ground meat. Okay there. At least its not inu no iki (dog breath). Surimi is made by mashing up a white meat fish, like pollock, so its the consistency of a thick paste. Nothing offensive there. A host of other ingredients are added to the fish to make it look, smell, taste, and feel like crab. Heres where it gets interesting.This is the list of ingredients for one brand of imitation crab: Alaska Pollock, Water, Egg Whites, Wheat Starch, Sugar, Corn Starch, Sorbitol, Contains 2% or Less of the Following: King Crab Meat, Natural and Artificial Flavor, Extracts of Crab, Oyster, Scallop, Lobster and Fish (Salmon, Anchovy, Bonito, Cutlassfish), Refined Fish Oil (Adds a Trivial Amount of Fat) (Anchovy, Sardine), Rice Wine (Rice, Water, Koji, Yeast, Salt), Sea Salt, Modified Tapioca Starch, Carrageenan, Yam Flour, Hydrolyzed Soy, Corn, and Wheat Proteins, Potassium Chloride, Disodium Inosinate and Guanylate, Sodium Pyrophosphate, Carmine, Paprika. Lets spend a few minutes here. Beside the various starches (wheat, corn, tapioca, and soy), theres artificial flavor and then theres the stuff we cant pronounce: No, this isnt hard to pronounce, but what is it? Its a salt substitute Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Eating Crab Meat

Health Benefits Of Eating Crab Meat

Health benefits of eating crab meat. (Getty Images) Good for diabetics Along with all other shellfish, crabs are rich in chromium, which helps insulin to metabolize sugar, and thereby lowers the blood glucose levels in the body. All shellfish, including crab , have generous amounts of selenium. Selenium is an anti-oxidant and cancels out the carcinogenic effects of cadmium, mercury and arsenic, which can cause tumors in humans. It has been proved that higher levels of selenium in the blood lead to lower rates of cancer. In fact, lysate, which is extracted from the blue blood of the horse-shoe crab, is used for detection of spinal meningitis and for fighting cancer. While crab meat is considered low in saturated fat, the presence of chromium helps increase the level of HDL (good cholesterol) in your body, and thus reduces the risk of strokes, coronary and circulatory heart disease. In fact, crabs contain sterol, which restrict the absorption of other cholesterol eaten during a meal, thus cancelling out the harmful effects of other fats added to your meal. Crabs, like all shellfish, are also a rich source of omega 3 fatty acids. The crabs get these from consuming phytoplanktons and algae, which is a big part of their diet. Omega 3 fatty acids are immensely useful to people and help in reducing the stickiness of blood platelets, thus making red blood cells more flexible and ensuring a smoother flow. Omega 3 acids also help to reduce the level of tri-glycerides and LDL (low-density lipo-proteins), which choke up artery walls as deposits. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App . Download The Times of India news app for your device. Continue reading >>

What Should You Be Eating If You Have A Fatty Liver?

What Should You Be Eating If You Have A Fatty Liver?

What Should You Be Eating If You Have A Fatty Liver? Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide and will have a major impact on the health care requirements of many countries in the future. NAFLD can progress to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. These are the reasons I have done a lot of research into the diet and nutritional therapies that can reverse the pathology of NAFLD. The liver possesses remarkable properties of repair and renewal and it is possible to completely reverse NAFLD if it is detected early enough. We are seeing NAFLD in a much younger population and it is not uncommon in overweight children. This is worrying because the earlier in life you develop a fatty liver, the more likely you are to develop complications. I have developed a very specific way of eating, which is designed to: Reduce the fat in the liver Minimize liver damage Improve the function of insulin Make weight loss easier This is not a low-fat low-calorie diet, and unlike those old fashioned diets, will not leave you hungry and tired. It is not a high protein diet either but rather provides you with first class protein regularly throughout the day, along with plenty of vegetables and some good fats. Enjoy this way of eating, as your liver will definitely thank you for it! With your meals it is ideal to include: Raw plant food, especially raw vegetables. A maximum of 2 pieces of fruit daily are allowed while you are trying to lose weight. Most fruits are fairly high in sugar. Vegetables contain very little sugar, therefore you can eat unlimited quantities. Cooked vegetables of different varieties including some starchy vegetables (except potatoes); this will compensate for the fact that you will not be eating bread, bis Continue reading >>

Dietary And Policy Priorities For Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, And Obesity

Dietary And Policy Priorities For Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, And Obesity

Suboptimal nutrition is a leading cause of poor health. Nutrition and policy science have advanced rapidly, creating confusion yet also providing powerful opportunities to reduce the adverse health and economic impacts of poor diets. This review considers the history, new evidence, controversies, and corresponding lessons for modern dietary and policy priorities for cardiovascular diseases, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. Major identified themes include the importance of evaluating the full diversity of diet-related risk pathways, not only blood lipids or obesity; focusing on foods and overall diet patterns, rather than single isolated nutrients; recognizing the complex influences of different foods on long-term weight regulation, rather than simply counting calories; and characterizing and implementing evidence-based strategies, including policy approaches, for lifestyle change. Evidence-informed dietary priorities include increased fruits, nonstarchy vegetables, nuts, legumes, fish, vegetable oils, yogurt, and minimally processed whole grains; and fewer red meats, processed (eg, sodium-preserved) meats, and foods rich in refined grains, starch, added sugars, salt, and trans fat. More investigation is needed on the cardiometabolic effects of phenolics, dairy fat, probiotics, fermentation, coffee, tea, cocoa, eggs, specific vegetable and tropical oils, vitamin D, individual fatty acids, and diet-microbiome interactions. Little evidence to date supports the cardiometabolic relevance of other popular priorities: eg, local, organic, grass-fed, farmed/wild, or non–genetically modified. Evidence-based personalized nutrition appears to depend more on nongenetic characteristics (eg, physical activity, abdominal adiposity, gender, socioeconomic status, culture) than genetic f Continue reading >>

Reasons Shellfish Is Unhealthy

Reasons Shellfish Is Unhealthy

Shellfish is delicious, and its a favorite for preparing elegant dishes (like Mini Lobster Rolls) . Theres just something amazingly delicious about the soft white meat that is found in crabs, lobsters, shrimp, and other shellfish but its hardly a health food. Unfortunately, its actually better to avoid eating shellfish for a number of health reasons. Heres why you should avoid eating shellfish: Shellfish feed on the dead skin of dead animals, as well as parasites. They are bottom feeders, and can be a host to parasites and other harmful organisms. Shellfish dont have a proper digestive system to filter out the toxins and parasites from their bodies meaning anything harmful absorbed into the shellfish stays in the shellfish. Shellfish are one of the most common allergen-causing foods. Shellfish allergies are surprisingly common around the world. Shellfish like shrimp often comes from places that dont control the amount of toxins, chemicals, and contaminants that the shellfish are exposed to. Shellfish have a very simple digestive system, making it difficult for them to expel wastes. When you eat shellfish, you often end up eating those wastes as well. For example, when you try to de-vein a shrimp, if the vein isnt completely removed you are essentially eating shrimp poop. Shellfish of nearly every type is known to contain contaminants, particularly mercury. Mercury is one of the most hazardous of the heavy metals, and can lead to serious health problems. Shellfish tends to have very high levels of cholesterol. With just four or five shrimp ergo, one serving youre getting up to 150 milligrams of cholesterol. Thats over half of the amount of cholesterol youre recommended to eat in a day. Shellfish is treated as dirty by many religions Judaism, Christianity, and others. Th Continue reading >>

Food Safety For People With Diabetes

Food Safety For People With Diabetes

Food Safety for People with Diabetes (PDF - 2.78MB) - En español (Spanish) (PDF - 2.90MB) A need-to-know guide for those who have been diagnosed with diabetes U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration September 2006; Slightly revised September 2011 Food safety is important for everyone – but it’s especially important for you. That’s why the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Food and Drug Administration have prepared this booklet. It is designed to provide practical guidance on how to reduce your risk of foodborne illness. In addition to this guide, we encourage you to check with your physician or health care provider to indentify foods and other products that you should avoid. You have a special need for this important information . . . so read on! What’s Inside Food Safety: It’s Especially Important for You Eating at Home: Making Wise Food Choices Common Foods: Select the Lower Risk Options Taking Care: Handling and Preparing Food Safely Foodborne Illness in the United States When certain disease-causing bacteria, viruses or parasites contaminate food, they can cause foodborne illness. Another word for such a bacteria, virus, or parasite is “pathogen.” Foodborne illness, often called food poisoning, is an illness that comes from a food you eat. The food supply in the United States is among the safest in the world – but it can still be a source of infection for all persons. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 48 million persons get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die from foodborne infection and illness in the United States each yea Continue reading >>

What Can A Type 2 Diabetic Eat?

What Can A Type 2 Diabetic Eat?

Type 2 diabetics can eat a wide variety of foods, but have to limit saturated fats, sweets, and high-carbohydrate products. Snacking should be curtailed, but a doctor or dietitian might suggest eating smaller meals more often to stop in-between hunger pangs. The type 2 diet also requires meal planning, since it calls for a cutback on prepackaged and processed foods. Grains Stick to whole grains, since they help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. Try whole wheat or rye bread, brown rice, oatmeal, cream of wheat, and high-fiber cereals. Fruits All fruits are good for diabetics, but some are better than others. Among those that raise blood-glucose levels more slowly are apples, oranges, grapefruit, bananas, various berries, and cantaloupe. Grapes lower insulin resistance, allowing insulin in your body to more quickly lower blood sugar. Vegetables Green leafy vegetables are better than starchy choices like potatoes, corn, and lima beans. Broccoli is among the best things to eat, especially for type 2 diabetics, since it contains high levels of chromium, found to regulate blood sugars. Other good vegetables include legumes, like pinto beans, kidney beans, and navy beans, as well as squash, zucchini, kale, and okra. Avocados are a good source of vitamin E and monounsaturated fats, which help lower bad cholesterol. Protein The most important thing to watch when you consume protein sources is the fat content. Eat chicken or turkey without the skin, and make sure selections of beef and pork contain no gristle. Among seafood, enjoy tuna, salmon, clams, crabs, oysters, shrimp, and mussels. Eggs are a good choice for breakfast, but limit yourself to just a few a week. Nuts are a good way to get protein, especially almonds, which are high in fiber. Dairy Watch the fat cont Continue reading >>

The Truth About Shrimp, Salmon, Lobster, Crab And More

The Truth About Shrimp, Salmon, Lobster, Crab And More

Did you know the average American consumed 16.1 pounds of fish and shellfish last year — compared to 183.6 pounds of meat and poultry? Low in fat, high in protein and rich in omega-3 fatty acids, seafood is a healthy alternative to meat and poultry, and many of us would do well to eat more of it. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce inflammation and triglycerides and blood pressure, all of which are known risk factors in heart disease. Plus, according to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the fatty acids found in fish and shellfish may help promote brain health. The federal government’s latest dietary guidelines, released in 2011, recommend eating eight ounces of seafood per week. But like most foods, moderation is key; shellfish are surprisingly high in cholesterol, particularly lobster and crab, and some varieties of fish, such as swordfish and tuna, are known to contain mercury. There are plenty of fish in the sea, as they say, and with a little nutritional background it’s easy to work these foods into a balanced, healthy diet. Shrimp: Three ounces of shrimp (or about seven medium-sized shrimp) has a mere 84 calories, 1g of fat, and an impressive 18g of lean protein. And talk about versatility: enjoy them chilled (cocktail style), in a stir-fry with your favorite veggies, tossed in a steaming bowl of soup, perched atop a crisp leafy salad, stacked on skewers, and more. Nutritionally, shrimp are a great source of selenium, an antioxidant that fights cancer-causing free radicals in your body. Other nutrients in shrimp include vitamins D and B3, plus the mineral zinc, and iodine, which is important for dieters because deficiencies can promote weight gain or hinder weight loss. If you are watching your cholesterol, it’s best to go easy on shrimp Continue reading >>

How Diabetics Eat Crab | A Personal Chef For Diabetics...and Others

How Diabetics Eat Crab | A Personal Chef For Diabetics...and Others

If I were into astrology, Id say my moon is in Neptune, for the topic of buying, cooking and eat crab has popped up in conversation with a freaky regularity of late. And then I come across this dish. Pick through the crab meant to remove any shells fragments. In a medium bowl, combine the crab meat, bread crumbs, eggs, pepper, flour, parsley lemon juice, mayo, Old Bay seasoning, thyme and cayenne pepper until blended. Go easy hereyou dont want to break down the crab too much. Shape the mixture into similar-size cakes. Heat the oil in a medium skillet. Add the cakes (in batches if you have to) and brown on each side, 1-2 minutes. Continue cooking, covered, over medium-low heat, turning now and then, until fully cooked, about 4-5 more minutes on each side. Serve. Calories: 106, Protein: 12g, Sodium: 313mg, Carbs: 7g * In Baltimore, where crab is king and everyone has a family recipe for this dish, Old Bay Seasoning is found in almost every pantry. If you cant find it, look for a seafood seasoning. Recipe, courtesy Forbidden Foods Diabetic Cookbook Kent McDonald is a Certified Personal Chef, living and working in Phoenix, AZ. (c) All rights reserved, 2012. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Starters & Snacks

Diabetes-friendly Starters & Snacks

Grabbing a quick bite to eat can be a disaster to your blood sugar levels if you're not careful, and appetizers and snacks are often laden with calories, salt, and greasy saturated fats. With these diabetes-friendly recipes, you can graze the appetizer table without guilt. Browse through our favorite snack and appetizer recipes now! Sautéed, then roasted with shallots, lemon, and thyme, these tender and flavorful artichokes make perfect party hors d'oeuvres. See the full recipe! Serve this creamy dip with whole wheat bread, pita chips, raw vegetables, or crackers for a filling mid-afternoon snack. See the full recipe! Grilled teriyaki chicken skewers are a succulent addition to fresh zucchini salad tossed with lemon juice and sesame oil. See the full recipe! This sophisticated appetizer of lean pork meatballs with ginger-soy dipping sauce is a delightful first course for a special dinner. See the full recipe! If you're looking for a savory starter to precede a light and crisp main dish, these rich, crabmeat-stuffed shrimp are a perfect solution. See the full recipe! Pair this mélange of juicy fresh fruit, sweet dried fruit, and protein-rich nuts with a cup of chai tea for a piquant afternoon snack. See the full recipe! Garnished with feta and crisp veggies, these easy pan-fried cakes make a pretty party dish. Perfect for unexpected guests, the cakes can be stored in the refrigerator and reheated in a snap. See the full recipe! Make a dent in your 5-a-day with a healthy serving of this flavorful, veggie-filled dip. It’s a great alternative to fat-full ranch or onion dips. See the full recipe! These lightly glazed shrimp skewers are a top-notch finger-food, sure to serve as a conversation-starter at your next party. See the full recipe! Quell your hunger with this del Continue reading >>

Is Shrimp, Crab And Lobster Safe To Eat For Diabetes .

Is Shrimp, Crab And Lobster Safe To Eat For Diabetes .

Is shrimp, crab and lobster safe to eat for DIABETES . Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. Is shrimp, crab and lobster safe to eat for DIABETES . I'm Diabetes type 2......my cholesterol is 140.....Can I eat shrimp, crab and lobster ? ran23, meyery2k and macksvicky reacted to this Thanks for reply .....I Love shrimp, crab and lobster too... I'm Diabetes type 2......my cholesterol is 140.....Can I eat shrimp, crab and lobster ? If I could afford it...that's all I'd eat. A little rule of thumb to remember about food. It's either a fat, a protein or a carbohydrate. I.E. shrimp, good. Breaded shrimp in cocktail sauce that has sugar...maybe not. NoraWI, macksvicky and meyery2k reacted to this LocationSomewhare in the South Pacific??? ran23, meyery2k and macksvicky reacted to this Very similar to how I like to cook my shrimp. macksvicky, meyery2k, adiantum and 1 other reacted to this Theres some great tips in that link following the Headbangers garlic prawns. meyery2k, janice21475, macksvicky and 1 other reacted to this I have a really simple but tasty way to prepare shrimp. Heat butter in a pan, add shrimp, salt, pepper, garlic to taste. There is this Vietnamese chili garlic sauce that I really like. I stir in about a tablespoon of that. Plate and squeeze a little lemon on the top of it. Fast, simple, good... macksvicky, janice21475, ran23 and 1 other reacted to this ran23, janice21475 and macksvicky reacted to this LocationSomewhare in the South Pacific??? If they're not breaded, all of the above should be fine. I enjoy all three, but rarely have lobster. Use Almond Flour, Pamasan Grated Cheese and a Spice that may be to your liking. Any how, i love Salmon. Use Almond Flour, Pamasan Grated Ch Continue reading >>

Woman Loses More Than Four Stone By Eating Crab Sticks

Woman Loses More Than Four Stone By Eating Crab Sticks

Woman loses more than four stone by eating crab sticks A woman has lost more than four stone by munching on thousands of crab sticks. Could not subscribe, try again laterInvalid Email A woman has lost more than four stone by munching on thousands of crab sticks. Mum-of-four Betty Saxton, 49, ate her way through more than 9,000 of them to shift her excess weight. At 5ft 1in, she ballooned to more than 16 stone looking after her sick husband, Ian. So she ditched her diet of snacks and fatty foods and began eating 18 crab sticks a day for lunch and dinner. After 18 months she has dropped to 12 stone. She still loves their taste and gets through eight 1.99 packs of 16 sticks a week. Betty, of Clacton, Essex, said: "I used to pig out on anything I could get my hands on and brim every plate with enough food for two people. I love the taste of crab sticks and can't get enough of them. They go well with salad and make the perfect snack. "Ian is diabetic and has to eat late at night. It was difficult not to eat with him. The crab sticks mean I don't eat crisps and chocolate." Continue reading >>

Diabetic Appetizers And Snacks

Diabetic Appetizers And Snacks

Choose Wisely Treats offered at parties, celebrations, or even just around the office may be tempting, but they can wreak havoc with blood sugars. Following simple steps like keeping a drink in your hand or moving around the room help limit the urge to overindulge, and allow you to easily maintain the healthy habits necessary for a diabetic diet. First up is our Hot Crab Dip. Our version of this indulgently creamy party classic contains only 63 calories per serving, but that doesn't mean you'll have to sacrifice taste. View Recipe: Hot Crab Dip Herbed Goat Cheese This is a simple make-ahead recipe, ideal for summer entertaining. The longer the cheese refrigerates, the more flavor it absorbs from the herbs. You can leave it to marinate for up to two days. For optimal flavor, let the goat cheese stand at room temperature about 10 minutes before serving. View Recipe: Herbed Goat Cheese West Indies Shrimp With only 2 grams of carbohydrates and less than 2 grams of fat per serving, what’s not to love about this make-ahead party appetizer? You can cook the shrimp and make the marinade ahead. Combine them just before serving. View Recipe: West Indies Shrimp Hot Artichoke-Cheese Dip This artichoke cheese dip is just the thing when you hanker for a creamy, cheesy snack. And because you are likely to have the ingredients on hand in the fridge and freezer, it's also great for impromptu entertaining. View Recipe: Hot Artichoke-Cheese Dip Orange and Avocado Salsa Serve this salsa with chips, or spoon it atop sautéed chicken breast or fish. If you want to make the salsa ahead, omit the cilantro and avocado, and stir them in just before serving. If you find blood oranges, substitute them for regular oranges for seasonal color. View Recipe: Orange and Avocado Salsa Continue reading >>

Shellfish May Raise Diabetes Risk: Study

Shellfish May Raise Diabetes Risk: Study

October 21, 2009 / 5:40 PM / 8 years ago NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Eating white and oily fish regularly may provide protection against type 2 diabetes, but eating shellfish may have the opposite effect, a study from the UK hints. The study team noted about 25 percent less risk type 2 diabetes among men and women who reported eating one or more, as opposed to fewer, servings of white or oily fish each week. Unexpectedly, however, they found that men and women who ate similar amounts of shellfish primarily prawns, crab, and mussels had about 36 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. But it may not be the shellfish per se which increased the risk for diabetes, Dr. Nita Forouhi, of Addenbrookes Hospital, University of Cambridge, noted in an email to Reuters Health. Rather, the cooking and preparation methods used in the UK, for example, oils used when frying or butter- and mayonnaise-based sauces served with shellfish, may increase cholesterol intake which, in turn, may raise diabetes risk. Forouhi and colleagues assessed the weekly intake of shellfish plus white fish such as cod, haddock, sole, and halibut, or oily fish such as mackerel, kippers, tuna, and salmon, reported by 9,801 men and 12,183 women. The study participants were 40 to 79 years old at the time and had no history of diabetes. Over an average of 10 years, 725 of these men and women developed type 2 diabetes. Both the lower risk linked with white and oily fish and the greater risk tied to shellfish intake remained when the investigators allowed for a range of diabetes risk factors including physical activity, obesity, alcohol use, and fruit and vegetable intake. The investigators emphasize that the link between shellfish intake and diabetes risk requires further investigations in other popu Continue reading >>

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