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Can Diabetics Eat Coconut Chutney

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Eating well with Diabetes: South Indian and Sri Lankan diets Many staple foods in the South Indian diet are good for your health. From fresh guava to lentils to vegetarian cuisine, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, deep fried items, high-fat foods and refined flour are also common and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan that is right for you. It will likely include exercise, a meal plan, blood sugar monitoring and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes information in other languages! Call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 to get practical tips and information on managing diabetes in: Gujrati, Pakistani, Punjabi and Urdu. This information will tell you which of your favourite traditional foods fit into a healthy diet and which should be limited to help you manage diabetes. Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of South Asian descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with South Asian heritage. If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours to keep your blood s Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Coconuts?

Can Diabetics Eat Coconuts?

Diabetes isn't the death sentence it was in the days before insulin, but it's still not a condition to take lightly. A healthy lifestyle is crucial to living well with diabetes, and managing your diet plays a significant part in that process. Once you've learned how foods -- especially carbohydrates -- affect your blood sugar, you can evaluate foods such as fresh coconuts and make educated estimates about whether and when you can eat them. It's Not Black and White In its infancy, diabetes management focused largely on avoiding high-sugar foods. Medical professionals now have a more nuanced understanding of how foods affect blood sugar, and educators have moved away from simple lists of foods to eat and not eat. Instead the emphasis is on managing your total carbohydrate consumption. This includes favoring carbohydrates that digest slowly over those that digest quickly, which helps avoid major swings in your blood sugar levels. Savvy meal planners also pay attention to dietary fiber, which slows the absorption of carbs and sugars from your foods. Carbs and Coconuts Fresh coconut is a very modest contributor to your daily total consumption of carbohydrates, in part because a little goes a long way. It's often shaved or shredded into dishes as a garnish because solid pieces require a jaw-tiring quantity of chewing. Consider a 2-inch square of coconut, roughly 1/2 inch thick, a good snack-sized portion. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's figures estimate that total carbohydrates would account for 6.9 grams of its 45-gram weight, or roughly 2 percent of your recommended daily allowance. Of that 6.9 grams, only 2.8 grams come in the form of sugar. Finding the Fiber Just as importantly, coconut is an exceptional source of dietary fiber. So much so, in fact, that coconut fibe Continue reading >>

Interest About Indian Diabetics

Interest About Indian Diabetics

D.D. Family T2 since May 2007, started Byetta Jan 2008 You can come visit me and dance. It rains here a lot! Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain. D.D. Family T2 since May 2007 - Metformin Hi Dkc I love Indian food especially the spicy dishes! Pathia and jalfrazi seem to do little to my bg, and I also eat a tandoori mixed grill. Post you recipies please... the more the better! Banned My mother is a Diabetic since 10 yrs South Indian food is very spicy- even so for north Indians; its basically rice based, with Sambar ( sort of soup made of red gram ) , lots of coconut chutney also goes with almost all south Indian dishes- This is what I can say from my perception of South Indian dishes. Rice - specially the way its used in Idly is very well processed- must be with high Glycemic index Vada and Dosas contain Urad daal ( black gram) with high carb & protein content, Coconut is high in saturated fats. on the whole does not seem to be a good idea for a diabetic Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

After meal measurements should be made 12 h after the beginning of the meal, generally peak levels. intensive diet and physical activity targeting loss of 7% of body weight such as brisk walking to at least 150 min/week. At least annual monitoring for the development of diabetes in those with prediabetes is suggested. Screening for and treatment of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease is suggested. Children with diabetes or prediabetes - at least 60 min of physical activity each day. Adults with diabetes - at least 150 min/ week of moderate-intensity aerobic 5070% of maximum heart rate, spread over at least 3 days/week with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise. Reduce sedentary time, particularly by breaking up extended amounts of time >90 min spent sitting. Continue reading >>

Coconut Fiber For Diabetics

Coconut Fiber For Diabetics

Janet Renee is a clinical dietitian with a special interest in weight management, sports dietetics, medical nutrition therapy and diet trends. She earned her Master of Science in nutrition from the University of Chicago and has contributed to health and wellness magazines, including Prevention, Self, Shape and Cooking Light. Coconut flour has a pleasant and light texture.Photo Credit: marekuliasz/iStock/Getty Images When you think of dietary fiber, traditional sources such as oats, beans and whole grains likely come to mind. However, clinical data suggests you may want to consider coconut as a source of fiber as well. It may help promote healthy blood sugar levels in people with and without diabetes. You can add coconut flour -- a concentrated source of coconut fiber -- to meals to boost the fiber content. Talk to your health care provider before adjusting your diet, especially if you have diabetes. Fiber is a crucial dietary component for people with and without diabetes. Even though fiber is a type of carbohydrate, it does not raise blood glucose. Because fiber passes through your body undigested, it doesn't have the same effect on blood sugar as other types of carbs. Foods contain a mixture of two types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. The first type dissolves in water and forms a gel that helps slow absorption of glucose. Diets rich in soluble fiber may help improve glucose levels. The other type of fiber does not dissolve in water but instead adds bulk to stool, promoting regularity. Coconut flour might help keep your blood sugar levels stable, according to a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition in 2003. Researchers evaluated the blood sugar effect of adding coconut flour to different carbohydrate foods, such as granola bars and multigrain breads, Continue reading >>

Coconut Chutney Or Dip

Coconut Chutney Or Dip

Whole Food Plant Based Vegan Recipes from PHC's Be Your Own Doc Project Coconut chutney can you imagine eating pongal without it? It is a must have for us! Yum! Coconut is a super versatile nut, and goes well with any sort of recipe, savory and sweet, adding its unique flavor to the dish. In South India, coconut is used in pretty much every dish, from chutney to sambar to poriyal to avial ! Coconut milk is a much loved ingredient as well. Chutneys today are popularly garnished with an oil tadka. This is unnecessary and does not add any health benefit to the chutney when nuts are already used. In fact, nut-based chutneys have plenty of natural oil by themselves, from the whole nut. This oil is of much better quality than any extracted oil, whether it is unrefined or refined. Heres a super easy and delicious coconut chutney recipe. It can be used as dip with vegetables or salads, or with pongal , idli, dosa or roti . We have replaced green chili with pepper, to bring out spice that does not irritate the intestines. Bring out the creative side in you using herbs and spices to flavor this versatile chutney. Hope you enjoy it! Continue reading >>

Moong Dal Dosa - A Healthy Snack Option

Moong Dal Dosa - A Healthy Snack Option

Moong dal is a great source of protein, vitamins and dietary fiber. Moong Dal Dosa or Pesarattu is also low in sodium, saturated fat and cholesterol making a very healthy snack option for people with diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Perfect for an after school snack for young children too. Ingredients: 1 cup whole green moong dal 1 tbsp urad dal 2 tbsp yoghurt 3-4 tbsp water Salt to taste (add minimal or no salt to the recipe) 2 green chilies (optional) Steps: Wash the moong and urad dal thoroughly and soak them in water for 2 to 3 hours minimum. Can be soaked overnight too. Rinse the dal after they have been soaked and in a blender, grind it with yogurt and water. Add more water if required till a soft consistency has been achieved. Cover and leave it in a warm place for another 2 to 3 hours. When the mixture has fermented, add salt and finely chopped green chili to your taste. Stir well. On a hot non-stick flat pan, brush small amount of oil on it. Spread a ladle full of mixture just like a dosa in a circular motion. When the edges start to brown, remove from the pan. Serve hot with coriander or coconut chutney. (Keep salt low and eat chutneys in small quantities) Do you have a variation you like to follow? Share it with the PatientsEngage communty The image above is not exactly as per the recipe. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Dosa?

Can Diabetics Eat Dosa?

Dosa is a famous south Indian breakfast! Which is now eaten all over India. As Dosa is rich in carbohydrates Every Diabetic has this Question " Can diabetics eat Dosa" Of course you can but you may have to limit the no of Dosas you take and also may modify the recipe and try making Fenugreek Dosa , Moong dal Dosa. Let us see How is it going to be if you take Dosa in your breakfast. Dosa with coconut chutney and sambar is the most favourite one for many of us, Let us see the recipe for plain dosa to understand what does it contain so that we can get the answer for our question Can Can Diabetics eat Dosa? Dosa is generally made of raw rice and urad dal, but the recipe we are showing is bit modified one so that it will suit better to diabetics. All the ingredients in Dosa and Coconut chutney are good for diabetics but raw rice is not very good for diabetics. Generally people only use raw rice and urad dal for preparation of dosa. This recipe also includes parboiled rice which has lower glycemic index and rich in vitamins. One more tip is to use less coconut because coconut contains high amounts of saturated fat. So you may try coriander chutney or tomatoe onion chutney instead of coconut chutney. I make this tomatoe onion chutney which is diabetic friendly, see below how to make this chutney ingredients required 2 onions medium sized 1 tomatoe medium sized green chillies -2 garlic cloves -3 curry leaves - 8 mustard seeds- 1/2 tsp cumin seeds- 1 tsp ginger - as you like oil - 1 tbsp (I prefer rice bran oil) how to prepare diabetic friendly onion tomatoe chutney Fry all the ingredients Allow them to cool to room temperature make them into a fine paste using a mixie grinder. chutney is ready. HDFD COMMENT Diabetics can eat plain dosa but should be careful with the type of chu Continue reading >>

Coconut Meat & Diabetes Nutrition

Coconut Meat & Diabetes Nutrition

For thousands of years, coconut has been part of the daily diet of many Pacific islanders, and various coconut-based products are now available in the U.S. to provide your diet with a delicious exotic touch. If you have diabetes, carbohydrates are the most important nutritional factor to control it. Counting your carbs at each meal is the best way to keep your blood sugar levels in check. However, most diabetes exchange lists do not include coconut meat and other related products and it can be difficult to know how coconut can fit in your diabetes diet. Video of the Day Fresh Coconut Meat A piece of fresh coconut meat of about 2 by 2 inches and about 1/2 inch thick contains 159 calories, 6.9 g of carbohydrates and 4 g of dietary fiber. When tracking your carb intake with diabetes, you can subtract the dietary fiber from the total carbohydrates to determine the available carb content, also called net carb, of a food. In this case, a small piece of fresh coconut meat would contain 2.9 g of available carbs. If you eat two to three pieces that size, double or triple the amount of carbs. Use available carbs when tracking your carb intake, as they give a more accurate picture of how your food choices will influence your blood sugar levels after your meal. Dessicated Coconut Unsweetened dessicated coconut meat contains 187 calories, 6.7 g of carbohydrates and 4.6 g of fiber per ounce, which is the equivalent of 2.1 g of available carbohydrates. The same serving of sweetened dessicated coconut meat provides 129 calories, 14.7 g of carbohydrates and 2.8 g of fiber, or approximately 11.9 g of available carbohydrates. Stick with unsweetened coconut products to keep your carb intake within your recommended target and avoid making your blood sugar levels rise above the desirable ran Continue reading >>

30 Best Benefits & Uses Of Coconut (nariyal) For Skin And Health

30 Best Benefits & Uses Of Coconut (nariyal) For Skin And Health

[ Read: Coconut For Weight Loss With 4 Weeks Diet Plan ] Coconut helps to increase energy by burning fat. The triglycerides found in coconut oil increase 24 hours of energy expenditure by 5% leading to weight loss in the long run. It is also known to reduce hunger pangs. This is directly related to the way fatty acids in the body are metabolized as ketone as appetite reducing effect. People who consistently use coconut products have a stronger ability to go without eating for several hours with no effects of hypoglycaemia. It also promotes healthy thyroid function and helps to relieve the symptom of chronic fatigue. A ketogenic diet is a low carb diet which is used to treat various disorders. Its best known application is treating epilepsy in children. The diet involves eating little carbs and large amounts of fat which can lead to increased concentrations of ketone bodies in the blood. This diet can dramatically reduce the rate of seizures in epileptic children. Coconut nutrition has also proven to have anti-cancer properties. It is especially beneficial to treat colon and breast cancer. Coconut water contains crucial electrolytes that help in maintaining hydration. People involved in easy workouts and other strenuous activities should include as much coconut water as they can in their diet. Coconut water replaces the lost electrolytes, provides hydration and increases immune response. It is a better alternative to water as it is tastier than plain water and is loaded with nutrition. Coconut water is considered to be more nutritious and healthier than whole milk. It contains lauric acid which is considered equivalent to mothers milk. It is naturally sterile as it permeates through the filtering husk. It also cures hangover. Coconut water has a natural isotonic beverag Continue reading >>

Coconut

Coconut

Tweet Coconut can be consumed in many different forms, and it can have a variety of benefits for people with diabetes. The coconut has great versatility, and it can form part of many people’s daily diets. It is highly nutritious and rich in fibre, vitamins and minerals, and it provides the majority of the food eaten on many islands worldwide. A coconut is actually a one-seeded drupe, not a nut, nor a fruit. Coconuts are generally regarded as having a number of advantageous for people with diabetes. Nutritional benefits of coconut Coconuts are high in naturally occurring saturated fat from short and medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) such as lauric acid. Lauric acid is converted in the body into monolaurin [163], a beneficial compound that destroys a wide variety of organisms that cause disease. It is used to fight common colds and viral infections, such as the flu. Coconuts also contain the following nutrients that can have benefits for the body: Vitamin C Thiamin (vitamin B1) Folate Potassium Manganese Copper Selenium Iron Phosphorous Potassium Coconut milk Coconut milk is derived from the flesh of the coconut. Coconut milk can come in two main forms: A thicker form, sometimes called coconut cream, that is commonly used in desserts or rich sauces A more fluid form, containing more added water, that can be used as a direct substitute for milk The more fluid form of coconut milk typically has no more calories than semi-skimmed milk. However, there are more calories in the thicker form of coconut milk, and caution may need to be exercised in regard to portion sizes. Furthermore, some forms of thicker coconut milk are heavily processed and include emulsifies, which might be bad for gut health and increase the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Coconut flour Coconut fl Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

To live a long and healthy life with Diabetes, following diet and exercise are very important along with medication. Diabetic diet is not different from normal diet; however some modifications need to be done for the normal diet Dietary Guidelines Eat more Vegetables: Eat more locally available and seasonal vegetables. Take them as curry, raita, and in raw form. Include green leafy vegetables regularly in the diet. Vegetables; contain fibre and many vitamins and minerals which are helpful in control of diabetes and to maintain good health. Eat variety of foods: for better control of blood sugar instead of using only rice include other grains like wheat, jowar, ragi or unpolished; rice in the diet, eating only white rice is not going to help to control Blood sugar. More of whole Grains: Include whole dals like moong dal and channa dal in everyday diet. Use less oil: Diabetic person is at higher risk of hear disease, it is advisable o reduce the consumption of oil for cooking. Restricted amount of oil for cooking and not preparing the vegetables in fried forms will help to consume less amount of oil. Traditionally used oils like groundnut and gingelly oil are good for health. Ghee, butter, coconut oil contain different type of fats, (which may increase cholesterol) and should be taken in small quantities. Use less salt: usually Indian diet is rich in salt, especially when using pickles, papad and adding more salt to food is quite common. Normally people with diabetes may also get Hypertension (B.P) and it is better to restrict the intake of pickles, papad and adding less salt while cooking food. Use of Eggs/ Non veg: Fish contains special type of oil which helps in blood sugar management, so consumption of fish is encouraged 3-4 times a week. Chicken also contain less fat Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Eating well with Diabetes: South Indian and Sri Lankan diets Many staple foods in the South Indian diet are good for your health. From fresh guava to lentils to vegetarian cuisine, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, deep fried items, high-fat foods and refined flour are also common and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan that is right for you. It will likely include exercise, a meal plan, blood sugar monitoring and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes information in other languages! Call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 to get practical tips and information on managing diabetes in: Gujrati, Pakistani, Punjabi and Urdu. This information will tell you which of your favourite traditional foods fit into a healthy diet and which should be limited to help you manage diabetes. Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of South Asian descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with South Asian heritage. If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours to keep your blood s Continue reading >>

Do Not Despair, You Can Defeat Diabetes

Do Not Despair, You Can Defeat Diabetes

I am excited to say this today after being a victim to the ravages of diabetes for the past twenty seven years. I was diagnosed a diabetic at the age of fifty and put on medications. I was told to avoid sweets and eat less quantities of foods like rice, potatoes, bananas etc. But sugar levels remained high and medicines were changed for stronger ones and higher doses. Gradually over the years my eye-sight deteriorated with cataract and retinopathy, developed high BP, ischemic heart disease and neuropathy in both lower limbs. I was daily swallowing so many pills for all these diseases and was more or less resigned to lead a life of misery. It was then by the grace of God that at the beginning of this month (May 13) I stumbled upon the Indian Diabetic Forum on the net. Reading the posts there on the low carb diet was an eye opener for me and I decided to try it out immediately. On the 8th night I had a totally grain-free meal and the next morning the FBS reading was 104 instead of the usual range of 160 180! Since then I have drastically reduced grain based foods (bread, chapatti, rice etc.) in my diet and BS levels have been consistently normal. I have also reduced the insulin and metformin doses. This has brought me joy and hope that at last I will be able to beat this demon of diabetes. My brothers and sisters suffering from the miseries of diabetes, just try it, you will lose nothing but will be surprised by the results. Continue reading >>

Dos And Don’ts Of A Diabetes Diet

Dos And Don’ts Of A Diabetes Diet

Diabetes has struck millions of people worldwide giving it the status of an epidemic. More than 50 million people are suffering from Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Health experts warn that the problem is growing at an alarming rate mainly due to unhealthy eating habits, lack of physical activity and stress. Another cause of high prevalence of the condition is lack of sleep. Clearly so, the theme of World Health Day this year is 'Beat Diabetes'. According to the International Diabetes Federation, India is home to over 65.1 million diabetics, and this number is set to touch 100 million in less than two decades. Indians on an average get diabetes 10 years earlier than their Western counterparts, Dr. Udaya Kumar Maiya, Medical Director, Portea Medical adds. Neha Sewani, Dietician, Truweight explains, "Diabetes has not suddenly cropped up but it has made its way slowly and steadily through the changing habits of people who now rely more on the app on their mobile to decide if they have eaten enough rather than trusting on the satiety center of their brain." She tells us about foods diabetic patients should include and avoid in order to have a healthy body and to keep diabetes under control. EARLY MORNING : 1tsp of Soaked fenugreek seeds / 1 tsp cinnamon powder +1 glass of water + Almonds/walnuts - 4-5 no. BREAKFAST : 1 Veg sandwich (Brown bread) + 1 glass milk / Mix vegetable oats - 1 cup + curd (Skim milk) - 1 cup / Mix vegetable multigrain upma - 1 cup + curd (Skim milk) - 1 cup / Brown Rice idli - 2 no. + sambhar - 1 bowl / Mix dal dosa/ragi dosa (Low oil) + chutney - 3 tsp (Green/coconut/tomato/ginger) + sprouts - 1 cup or boiled egg white - 2 no. MID MORNING : Fruit - 100gm / tender coconut water - 1 / vegetable juice - 1 glass / green tea - 1 cup / Buttermilk (skim milk cur Continue reading >>

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